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Old 09-17-2012, 06:41 PM
 
Location: MidCoast Maine
471 posts, read 601,178 times
Reputation: 304

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
"Ice & Slush or SNOW in Coastal maine?"

All of the above. Just get Firestone Winterforce tires and you'll be ready for anything. Shop around for the best price.
We do a fair amount of off-loading, and the single biggest thing you can do to tremendously increase your traction is to "air down" the tires. This is ONLY done when four-wheeling at slow speeds, below 15 MPH, for example. It is common for drivers of 4x4s to bring their tires down to 15, 10, even 5 lbs of air pressure per tire when doing slow, rock and trail climbing. Then we air back up to proper levels using compressors prior to hitting the pavement again.

Ok, here is the question. Is is ok to bring the air pressure down during normal winter driving, just a bit in slushy conditions as well for road and highway driving? I'm thinking just to ensure full contact on the road surface. Maybe just dropping 5 lbs or so from recommended air pressure levels; not too much.
Just thinking out loud and wondering if anyone does this.
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Old 09-17-2012, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,485 posts, read 14,286,680 times
Reputation: 8906
No. The larger the surface area, the more likely you are to hydroplane on slush. Tall narrow tires hydroplane least in slush. The Model T had no problems at all in slush. The Plymouth Duster with its wide "racing" tires could not move in slush.
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Old 09-17-2012, 08:24 PM
 
Location: MidCoast Maine
471 posts, read 601,178 times
Reputation: 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
No. The larger the surface area, the more likely you are to hydroplane on slush. Tall narrow tires hydroplane least in slush. The Model T had no problems at all in slush. The Plymouth Duster with its wide "racing" tires could not move in slush.
That makes excellent sense. Thank you for your insight!
Hey NMLM, are you still doing your Friday show?
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Old 09-17-2012, 09:04 PM
 
828 posts, read 1,403,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 221B View Post
I've read about sand in the trunk before. I think I also remember it being handy to spread out in front of a wheel that is spinning out in the snow to aid in traction. Can you tell me if you use the kind of sand bags you would purchase at, say a hardware store… the type that come in 25 or 50 lb sacks? The kind used to mix with cement for mortar?
So, a couple of 25 lb sacks would add 50 lbs to the rear of the vehicle, and two 50 lb sacks would add 100 lbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
if the vehicle is rear wheel drive, then yes, add some weight in the trunk, most vehicles today are front wheel drive

do you still add weight in the trunk of a car, that is front wheel drive????

I had a mechanic tell me No
Mainebrokerman answered it. BUT only a small bag [15 to 25 lbs] IF it is rear wheel drive. Just remember drive safely.
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Old 09-17-2012, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,480 posts, read 2,534,004 times
Reputation: 4197
Those of you who still believe that winter tires from prior to about 2000 are the same as winter tires in 2013, or that its all about putting a little weight in your car, need to bring themselves into the 21st century. Please take the time to look at this thread.

3 Season(better know as all season) VS Winter Tires in Maine Driving

If you are still not convinced, pardon me please, for trying to confuse you with scientific research facts. I was astounded, and happy to know what is really going on.
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Old 09-18-2012, 03:39 AM
 
17,158 posts, read 22,167,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoxCar Willie View Post
Mainebrokerman answered it. BUT only a small bag [15 to 25 lbs] IF it is rear wheel drive. Just remember drive safely.
some cars are just notoriously awful in snow, I had a rear wheel firebird years ago, and that car was a death trap in snow- good summer car, didnt use in the winter


I seem to think front wheel drive is much better in snow and ice, than rear wheel on most cars.

years ago, when you lost control of the car/road, in rear wheel drive, the back end would start fish-tailing, then come around sideways, and what a scary feeling
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Old 09-18-2012, 03:44 AM
 
17,158 posts, read 22,167,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
No. The larger the surface area, the more likely you are to hydroplane on slush. Tall narrow tires hydroplane least in slush. The Model T had no problems at all in slush. The Plymouth Duster with its wide "racing" tires could not move in slush.
The ford focus I had -had 50's tires, very wide for a light car
this was the only car in over 30 yrs of driving that I hydro-planed in (rain)
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Old 09-18-2012, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,480 posts, read 2,534,004 times
Reputation: 4197
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
The ford focus I had -had 50's tires, very wide for a light car
this was the only car in over 30 yrs of driving that I hydro-planed in (rain)
I had a ford focus, and it never hydroplaned. Its really all about the tires that you choose and the speed that you drive. My focus weighed in at 2750 without passengers. Its not so much about the car. Tires are not all the same, and if you are running all seasons then you have a much greater possibility of hydroplaning than if you run summer tires in summer.

Its all about the science of tires not about much else.
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Old 09-18-2012, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,485 posts, read 14,286,680 times
Reputation: 8906
"Hey NMLM, are you still doing your Friday show?"

Yes, indeed; Every Friday 9 to 10 AM. They are archived so you can listen on line on the Constitutional Radio Network. Just enter The Northern Maine Land Man Show.

This week will be how to improve and best use your land. Next week will be regulations and how to cope with them. Everybody has heard Confucius' famous quote: "May you live in interesting times." Many don't realize it is the first of three quotes. The second is, "May you attract the attention of government."
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Old 09-18-2012, 05:57 PM
 
17,158 posts, read 22,167,733 times
Reputation: 31223
Quote:
Originally Posted by slyfox2 View Post
I had a ford focus, and it never hydroplaned. Its really all about the tires that you choose and the speed that you drive. My focus weighed in at 2750 without passengers. Its not so much about the car. Tires are not all the same, and if you are running all seasons then you have a much greater possibility of hydroplaning than if you run summer tires in summer.

Its all about the science of tires not about much else.
is your last name Michelin? Goodyear? or Yokohama?
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