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Old 09-17-2012, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,493 posts, read 2,554,319 times
Reputation: 4240

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Clearly I want to buy a set of winter tires. A friend of mine in Ellsworth says that the roads get plowed pretty quickly, and in that nothing winter last year, they sure did. I found that I was mostly contending with light snow pack, ice, slushy ice and frozen slush from daytime melting. I didn't have to deal with deep snow or snow covered roads much.

So I need this year to buy tires that fit the conditions.

What are the conditions that you find in Coastal Maine in a normal winter?
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Old 09-17-2012, 10:56 AM
 
Location: 3.5 sq mile island ant nest next to Canada
3,015 posts, read 4,882,522 times
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I find that at times there is slush and patches of ice and some water from melting across the roads. Most times I find bare roads. Washington County plows and town plows seem to do a great job of plowing, IMO. I can tell the difference from Gouldsboro on home coming from Bangor or wherever. Most of the winter there are bare roads unless you stray too far to the shoulder. With a "Pius" heavy, aggressive tread as on my Jeep, ruins the gas mileage. Still, it's real good so this is relative. All seasons have never given me a problem and I have been (rightly) accused of driving it like I stole it.
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Old 09-17-2012, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,493 posts, read 2,554,319 times
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I'd like to maximize traction on my AWD Subaru, but I need to look for a tire that has to occasional duty in ice and slush, but mostly runs on very cold dry and wet roads. I need a winter tire, but not necessarily a snow tire. If I need to drive through deep snow, I will crank up the AWD Ford Explorer.
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Old 09-17-2012, 11:56 AM
 
Location: 3.5 sq mile island ant nest next to Canada
3,015 posts, read 4,882,522 times
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Talked to the tire dealer in Ellsworth or Brewer? They can guide.
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,493 posts, read 2,554,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by retiredtinbender View Post
Talked to the tire dealer in Ellsworth or Brewer? They can guide.
I prefer not to talk to the people who sell the tires. They want you to buy their tires. Besides, they can't come even close to matching the price on the tires. I looked at a set of four from a local dealer in Ellsworth. He wanted $612+ tax to mount the tires on my car. I can have them shipped to my house for a grand total of $383 from Tirebuyer.com. Its not going to cost me $57.25 EACH to have them mounted at my local car fixing garage. Heck, EVEN outrageous VIP doesn't charge more than $19.95 for balance and mounting per tire.
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Old 09-17-2012, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Oregon
56 posts, read 94,826 times
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I would think a set of good all season radials would work. I grew up in western PA and I didn't have specific winter tires or snow tires just all season ones . Where I lived we had a lot of snow in the winter. I never had any problems driving my 79 Cutlass. I did put a bag of sand in the trunk.
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Old 09-17-2012, 06:39 PM
 
828 posts, read 1,407,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catras View Post
I would think a set of good all season radials would work. I grew up in western PA and I didn't have specific winter tires or snow tires just all season ones . Where I lived we had a lot of snow in the winter. I never had any problems driving my 79 Cutlass. I did put a bag of sand in the trunk.
THIS is key to winter driving. [Weight] Front Wheel Drive is already set. Rear Wheel Drive you will need some weight in the rear. Pickups should have a bag or 2 of sand [well everyone should have a little bit anyways].

As for driving on ice, WELL even the best tires aren't a gimme on it. Ice driviing U slow, SLOW down!! I've seen folks with full 4WD go past me like I'm parked and end up in the ditch a mile up the road.

All I have ever used is all seasons, and while I have slid a bit, I have never had a major problem with them.
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Old 09-17-2012, 07:06 PM
 
Location: MidCoast Maine
471 posts, read 603,045 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoxCar Willie View Post
THIS is key to winter driving. [Weight] Front Wheel Drive is already set. Rear Wheel Drive you will need some weight in the rear. Pickups should have a bag or 2 of sand [well everyone should have a little bit anyways].
I've read about sand in the trunk before. I think I also remember it being handy to spread out in front of a wheel that is spinning out in the snow to aid in traction. Can you tell me if you use the kind of sand bags you would purchase at, say a hardware store… the type that come in 25 or 50 lb sacks? The kind used to mix with cement for mortar?
So, a couple of 25 lb sacks would add 50 lbs to the rear of the vehicle, and two 50 lb sacks would add 100 lbs.
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Old 09-17-2012, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,532 posts, read 14,343,579 times
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"Ice & Slush or SNOW in Coastal maine?"

All of the above. Just get Firestone Winterforce tires and you'll be ready for anything. Shop around for the best price.
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Old 09-17-2012, 07:18 PM
 
17,220 posts, read 22,262,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 221B View Post
I've read about sand in the trunk before. I think I also remember it being handy to spread out in front of a wheel that is spinning out in the snow to aid in traction. Can you tell me if you use the kind of sand bags you would purchase at, say a hardware store… the type that come in 25 or 50 lb sacks? The kind used to mix with cement for mortar?
So, a couple of 25 lb sacks would add 50 lbs to the rear of the vehicle, and two 50 lb sacks would add 100 lbs.
if the vehicle is rear wheel drive, then yes, add some weight in the trunk, most vehicles today are front wheel drive

do you still add weight in the trunk of a car, that is front wheel drive????

I had a mechanic tell me No
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