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Old 11-19-2012, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,494 posts, read 14,291,662 times
Reputation: 8919

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A Maine school got a million dollar grant from the feds to develop an outdoor program. The school bought canoes, kayaks, sleeping bags and all kinds of camping equipment. This was reported in the Maine Sunday Telegram.

I guess our school district was ahead of the trend. Some 20 years ago I was out dragging snowmobile trails at night. I came across three kids between the ages of 9 and 13 stopped on the trail miles from town. They were taking turns yanking on the starter rope of their snowmobile. All three were wearing sneakers. It was around zero and there was a wind. No kid had a lighter or matches to make a fire. I took my flashlight, shined it into the gas tank and rocked the sled. No gas. Hmmm; That's probably why it won't start. I had 2 gallons of mixed gas in the rear rack of my snowmobile. I dumped it into their snowmobile, started it and told them to go directly home. I mentioned it to their mother the next time I saw her. She told me to mind my own business.

Two teachers in our district named Dennis Carr and Kathy McAvoy began a middle school unit where they taught survival. The students learned map and compass, how to build a fire in the rain or snow, what to have for first aid to have a plan before heading off into the woods. They should tell somebody when they will be back from their trip. It was a good course. At the end of the course every kid had a personal survival kit. Much of it was donated by local businesses who thought this was a great idea. It was so good that these two teachers got a national award from the National Middle School Association for developing their unit. Every year the eighth graders from our local school climb Mount Katahdin. They do it in the fall when the foliage is just beginning to turn. The kids learn a lot before, during and after their expedition.

Education is not just the three R's. It can teach kids about life and why the fundamentals are important. Basic skills are not just to prepare them for entry level jobs. They are stepping stones to allow them to excel in life.
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Old 11-19-2012, 12:41 PM
 
178 posts, read 458,981 times
Reputation: 98
Nice post, agree.

I am surprised that mom didn't say "thank you"......? Maybe she should have taken a school-course in being polite when a stranger fills their kids gas tank so they are not stranded in the woods and have to freeze, or tire of exhaustion trying to start their sleds....
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Old 11-19-2012, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Cooper Maine
533 posts, read 587,057 times
Reputation: 492
People think because we have a cell phone you no longer need to learn to survive. I see this allot in Hunters up here to the whole "I got a cell phone so nothing can happen to me" thing. I go into he field Sure I now have a GPS but I also always have a small pack with a compass, fire starting supplies and a few other things I do not want to ever be without. I also keep a bag in my vehicles with blankets and all kinds of other things JUST IN CASE.
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Old 11-19-2012, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
38,425 posts, read 18,184,885 times
Reputation: 46306
I was in Japan....on top of an active volcano ( Mt Aso).... The guide said every year they have some people jump into the crater to commit suicide .... they dont know there is a ledge about 100 feet down...that will break their fall.....they won't hit the lava! Then they call on their cell phones requesting rescue...so a ranger has to be lowered down thru the sulfurous hot air to reach them and haul them back up. The cell phone shouldnt be your first response to emergency.
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Old 11-19-2012, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Maine
2,349 posts, read 1,581,831 times
Reputation: 4200
[IShe told me to mind my own business][/i]


No good deed goes unpunished, That 'mother' and I use that term loosely should be ashamed of her self.
Thanks for doing the right think and helping those kids, maybe they will learn something from your deeds that night.



bill
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Old 11-20-2012, 01:37 AM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,487 posts, read 6,428,655 times
Reputation: 9378
Ignorance abounds. I knew how to use a compass and read a USGS map before I was a teen. I thought it was just good common sense for going into the woods? (But it turned out I was miles ahead of most every other recruit in Basic Training.) I always had a decent knife and 'strike anywhere' matches (waxed and/or in a waterproof container). Cell phones hadn't been invented and if you got lost in the woods you couldn't just call someone to come and get you.

It's even more important in the Winter, when a storm could come up and you could find yourself off the trail and lost only a relatively short distance from 'civilization'. I was going to say that people were smarter then, but, thinking about it, there were plenty of stupid/ignorant people then too.

That reminds me, I need to replace my match supply, they go 'bad' even in a waterproof container.
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Old 11-20-2012, 06:55 AM
 
776 posts, read 1,033,249 times
Reputation: 1141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post

Education is not just the three R's. It can teach kids about life and why the fundamentals are important. Basic skills are not just to prepare them for entry level jobs. They are stepping stones to allow them to excel in life.
I sooo agree.

As I raise my own kids, I realize that a lot of life lessons that seemed to be learned naturally when we were young, aren't being passed down. My husband and I are aware of this, but it seems that many parents are not.

Basic survival in nature is really important, but may I add common sense on city streets too!....Like looking both ways before crossing the street. (Duh.) Lifting your eyes from your cell phone when you're amongst others. Unplugging the ear buds when your sense of hearing is important. (Hello.)

Also, basic manners and common courtesy...I used to think that young people were rude, then I realized that a lot of them weren't neccesarily rude, just clueless. These things must be taught and we as parents must lead as an example.

I also think money management courses should be taught in high school. This is a life lesson I didn't get. I don't think classes were offered when I was young, and my parents didn't offer any advice either. I was quite naive when I went out into the world and I made several mistakes. The importance of getting off on the right foot financially and understanding the consequences of bad credit is so important. My own children will be more prepared than I was, whether they take courses in school or I teach them myself.
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Old 11-20-2012, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,487 posts, read 6,428,655 times
Reputation: 9378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radio Flyer View Post
I sooo agree.
I also think money management courses should be taught in high school. This is a life lesson I didn't get. I don't think classes were offered when I was young, and my parents didn't offer any advice either. I was quite naive when I went out into the world and I made several mistakes. The importance of getting off on the right foot financially and understanding the consequences of bad credit is so important. My own children will be more prepared than I was, whether they take courses in school or I teach them myself.
Younger than high school, much younger. My 'Economics' class in high school didn't have squat to do with personal finances, rather, it dealt with national/international economies.

When I was very young, I got an allowance. It wasn't much, maybe ten cents...but at the time, that would buy two candy bars (or *ten* pieces of Bazooka bubblegum with the added bonus of a comic strip on the inside of the wrapper). I could spend it on anything I wanted, candy and cookies and other sweets weren't kept in our house so there was some attraction to that, but also, when we went shopping our mother didn't give in to "I want 'this'". Toys and trinkets weren't purchased for us on a whim. Outside of special occasions like birthdays and Xmas we didn't get things just given to us. If I wanted something I saw in a store I was told "If you want it, save your allowance and when you have enough, you can buy it." That was my introduction to personal finances and money management. I learned that money was limited and that one had to make choices, blowing it as soon as it was received or saving it for something bigger and better later (delayed gratification).

When I got a little older there were more things that I wanted and the small amount of 'allowance' that I got wouldn't cover it for a long, long time. I was told "If you want more money, you have to *earn* it." That was part two of the lesson- if I wanted more than the small handout I was getting, I would have to *work* for it. So, when I was 7 or 8
I got a paper route...and more than just having a 'job', I was 'in business'- *I* had to pay for the papers whether the customers paid me or not, so I had to learn the principals of business- providing good customer service, collecting the revenue that was due me and paying my supplier, and cutting service to those with 'bad debt'. Eventually, I had three routes in the morning (three different papers), another route in the afternoon, and then the Sunday editions of all the papers. No one drove me around to deliver the papers, it was made quite clear that this would never happen, *I* was responsible for it getting done. Sun, rain, sleet or snow, my customers *always* got their papers, delivered to the door (not thrown halfway up the lawn) and in good condition. I walked the routes until I saved enough money to buy a used bicycle. In Winter I dragged a toboggan through the snow if I couldn't ride (Sundays were a real *****). Of course, the 'allowance' ended with the first route.

Then I branched out, selling flower and vegetable seeds in the Spring, and greeting cards in the Fall.

I think that was a pretty good start to an education in personal finances and money management. (I think I'll not get into a rant on the evils of easy credit, buy now, pay later and instant gratification we are barraged with on a constant basis.)
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:22 PM
 
17,159 posts, read 22,175,230 times
Reputation: 31228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
A Maine school got a million dollar grant from the feds to develop an outdoor program. The school bought canoes, kayaks, sleeping bags and all kinds of camping equipment. This was reported in the Maine Sunday Telegram.

I guess our school district was ahead of the trend. Some 20 years ago I was out dragging snowmobile trails at night. I came across three kids between the ages of 9 and 13 stopped on the trail miles from town. They were taking turns yanking on the starter rope of their snowmobile. All three were wearing sneakers. It was around zero and there was a wind. No kid had a lighter or matches to make a fire. I took my flashlight, shined it into the gas tank and rocked the sled. No gas. Hmmm; That's probably why it won't start. I had 2 gallons of mixed gas in the rear rack of my snowmobile. I dumped it into their snowmobile, started it and told them to go directly home. I mentioned it to their mother the next time I saw her. She told me to mind my own business.

Two teachers in our district named Dennis Carr and Kathy McAvoy began a middle school unit where they taught survival. The students learned map and compass, how to build a fire in the rain or snow, what to have for first aid to have a plan before heading off into the woods. They should tell somebody when they will be back from their trip. It was a good course. At the end of the course every kid had a personal survival kit. Much of it was donated by local businesses who thought this was a great idea. It was so good that these two teachers got a national award from the National Middle School Association for developing their unit. Every year the eighth graders from our local school climb Mount Katahdin. They do it in the fall when the foliage is just beginning to turn. The kids learn a lot before, during and after their expedition.

Education is not just the three R's. It can teach kids about life and why the fundamentals are important. Basic skills are not just to prepare them for entry level jobs. They are stepping stones to allow them to excel in life.

the mother said...mind your own business???

sounds like she sent them out their to begin with-

survival training is an excellent idea, they will always remember the skills..
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:47 PM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,468 posts, read 11,156,285 times
Reputation: 3513
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernNE View Post
Nice post, agree.

I am surprised that mom didn't say "thank you"......? Maybe she should have taken a school-course in being polite when a stranger fills their kids gas tank so they are not stranded in the woods and have to freeze, or tire of exhaustion trying to start their sleds....
Maybe it was a "Hanzel und Gretel" situation?
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