U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maine
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-30-2012, 08:23 AM
 
327 posts, read 793,910 times
Reputation: 240

Advertisements

How frequently do forest fires occur in Maine? At least from my perspective living in the Mid-Atlantic you don't seem to hear about large scale fires in Maine, only out West where they suffer from dry spells. Just curious. Do folks with camps in remote areas tend to clear a perimeter within a certain distance around buildings? In the Pinelands of southern Jersey (1 million square miles of some of the most unspoiled wilderness in the state) the forest fire service recommends at least a 100 foot perimeter around homes clear of brush and trees. They tend to have at least a few fires every year, but the fire service also does prescribed burns. About five years ago they suffered a terrible fire that burned tens of thousands of acres due to an accidental release of incendiary munitions during the driest part of the Summer by an Air Force pilot on a training mission. The Warren Grove bombing range is located within the Pinelands. Anyway, just wondering.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-30-2012, 04:27 PM
 
17,158 posts, read 22,167,733 times
Reputation: 31223
Quote:
Originally Posted by deere110 View Post
How frequently do forest fires occur in Maine? At least from my perspective living in the Mid-Atlantic you don't seem to hear about large scale fires in Maine, only out West where they suffer from dry spells. Just curious. Do folks with camps in remote areas tend to clear a perimeter within a certain distance around buildings? In the Pinelands of southern Jersey (1 million square miles of some of the most unspoiled wilderness in the state) the forest fire service recommends at least a 100 foot perimeter around homes clear of brush and trees. They tend to have at least a few fires every year, but the fire service also does prescribed burns. About five years ago they suffered a terrible fire that burned tens of thousands of acres due to an accidental release of incendiary munitions during the driest part of the Summer by an Air Force pilot on a training mission. The Warren Grove bombing range is located within the Pinelands. Anyway, just wondering.
we've had our share of fires, but we dont have droughts, around here, like other places, also,,,we've had smokey the bear commercials for 50 yrs telling us not to start forest fires, only YOU can prevent forest fires
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2012, 11:16 AM
 
1,360 posts, read 1,855,908 times
Reputation: 1244
mainebrokerman: There have been a few summers when some of my neighbors' wells have gone dry. (not saying the droughts are like other places) I remember one summer when my mom had about 20 buckets in the yard gathering rain water because the well water was low and rain was sporadic. We didn't drink the rain water or cook with it but used it to flush. She didn't want to take a chance on the well going dry. We also did all the laundry at the laundry mat (city water) that summer to conserve our well water. My dad worked for a company where he was sent out numerous times to fight forest fires on land the company owned.

I love Smokey the Bear and the forest fire danger signs are informative. Maine Forest Service: National Fire Danger Rating System Description

I enjoy seeing Smokey in the Fourth of July parade in Bar Harbor. Here are a few more links.

Welcome to the Maine Forest Service

Forestry | Maine: An Encyclopedia

Maine Prepares: Display Fact Sheet

SmokeyBear.com - Only You Can Prevent Wildfires

http://www.kjonline.com/news/Study-S...y-winter-.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2012, 12:28 PM
 
468 posts, read 611,322 times
Reputation: 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainebrokerman View Post
we've had our share of fires, but we don't have droughts, around here, like other places...
Careful there.

Everything is subject to change and with Arctic summer ice setting new lows every September, who really knows about rainfall in Maine, going forward?

My potato farmer neighbor recently said that dry conditions this summer were about the worst he's ever seen it in his 30+ years of farming (Houlton area.)

As average soil temperatures warm up, even a little bit, we need more rain just to stay even. Maine gets less rain than areas to our south, but our soil usually avoids drought conditions because the soil stays so cool. But overall in New England, out of the last 36 months, only about 7 have been below normal in temperature, including the month that closed out yesterday.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2012, 12:30 PM
 
151 posts, read 162,888 times
Reputation: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by deere110 View Post
How frequently do forest fires occur in Maine? At least from my perspective living in the Mid-Atlantic you don't seem to hear about large scale fires in Maine, only out West where they suffer from dry spells. Just curious. Do folks with camps in remote areas tend to clear a perimeter within a certain distance around buildings? In the Pinelands of southern Jersey (1 million square miles of some of the most unspoiled wilderness in the state) the forest fire service recommends at least a 100 foot perimeter around homes clear of brush and trees. They tend to have at least a few fires every year, but the fire service also does prescribed burns. About five years ago they suffered a terrible fire that burned tens of thousands of acres due to an accidental release of incendiary munitions during the driest part of the Summer by an Air Force pilot on a training mission. The Warren Grove bombing range is located within the Pinelands. Anyway, just wondering.
Thank You, thank you for using the term "forest fire" instead of the over-used, TV news word of the day, excitement inducing '' WILD FIRE" it's not a prairie fire, not a grass fire, not a bush fire, it's a forest fire, now they even have Smokey the bear using this moronic term. thanks
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2012, 02:00 PM
 
17,158 posts, read 22,167,733 times
Reputation: 31223
Quote:
Originally Posted by tatans View Post
Thank You, thank you for using the term "forest fire" instead of the over-used, TV news word of the day, excitement inducing '' WILD FIRE" it's not a prairie fire, not a grass fire, not a bush fire, it's a forest fire, now they even have Smokey the bear using this moronic term. thanks
wild-fire was a pony , that came down from yellow mountain
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-01-2012, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,487 posts, read 6,426,587 times
Reputation: 9378
Quote:
Originally Posted by mainegrl2011 View Post
mainebrokerman: There have been a few summers when some of my neighbors' wells have gone dry. (not saying the droughts are like other places) I remember one summer when my mom had about 20 buckets in the yard gathering rain water because the well water was low and rain was sporadic. We didn't drink the rain water or cook with it but used it to flush. She didn't want to take a chance on the well going dry.
No problem with that here, I've even filled my pool from the well, about 12,000 gallons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2012, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,492 posts, read 14,286,680 times
Reputation: 8909
I'm a land guy. New Jersey does not have a million square miles. That would be an area thousand by a thousand miles. I have been in the Pine Barrens of NJ. They would be hard pressed to find a million acres, much less a million square miles.

That said, we don't have many large fires in Maine. The last big ones were on Mt. Desert Island in 1947, the Berwick area in 1947 and the Baxter Park fire around 1975. Most forest fires in Maine are caused by trains, lightning and careless campers.

Depending on the site of your camp or home, you must consider the vegetation by type and proximity at your site. The Maine Forest Service recommend a large area of fuel free ground around your home or camp. A few widely spaced shade trees are OK. Here's the problem: If you follow the recommendations of the Maine Forest Service, The Maine Department of Environmental Protection will fine you or put you in jail!

The system is broken. Proceed carefully.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-03-2012, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
Reputation: 17565
Months ago I was reading a blog about 'Forest Fires' in Maine, and thinking about the long-abandoned look-out towers I have seen about.

'47 Mt. Desert Island; '47 Berwick; and '75 Baxter Park; that is near nothing as compared to forest fires seen in drought-prone regions of the nation.

Granted it could all change tomorrow. A meteor could strike and who knows what could happen.

I enjoy living in forest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-08-2012, 01:28 AM
 
828 posts, read 1,403,010 times
Reputation: 1025
The state was dotted with fire towers till the 90's when they were abandoned for aircraft patrolling. Only 3 in York County are manned during the dry times [summer mostly] by members of the Southern Maine Fire Notification Association, a group of fire buffs. Their freq is 464.850 However you should look up Maine forest service freqs at radioreference.com, Each sector has different frequencies [unknown if they have gone to digital yet]


A very good book was written by my long lost friend David Hilton [a York Firefighter and co founder of SMFNA] called From York to the Allagash Forest Fire Lookouts of Maine [Dave left us in May of 2003] You can get it on Amazon I do believe. he travelled quite a bit for this information.


Having fought a few woods fires in my time i can say what we have in Maine is nothing compared to what they have in western states. the reason for the bad fires in 1947 was the fact it was a very dry summer and fall the leaves dried up and were on the ground and a single spark could set it off. Radio Communications were not fully used at the time and U gotta remember firetrucks in those days were the size of an F 250 or 350. had smaller pumps and small water tanks less the 500 gallons. Also they had some winds back then as well as fire creating winds. If you ever are in a firestorm you will remember it for the rest of your life [mine scared the crap outta me]
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maine
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top