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Old 07-21-2013, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Liverpool, England
16 posts, read 21,277 times
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wow those pics are amazing where are they from?
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Old 07-22-2013, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,708 posts, read 49,503,410 times
Reputation: 19152
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoCosmo View Post
We fancy getting an awd Dodge Charger, but never thought about the tyres. In Germany; I've gotten used to having Summer and Winter wheels, each with appropriate tyres. But studded ones are seldom available here. They can be had in Scandinavia or Russia. Therefore, I'd be interested in how the motorists of Maine tend to cope with mounds of snow, etc. Or should we go by the dealer's advice?
Buffalo, Detroit, NYC, Hartford, Providence, Boston; are all places where they do tend to get huge snow dumps. 2 feet, 3 feet over night is not unheard of. Those places are down-wind from the Great Lakes, in the 'snow-belt'.

Our first two years living in Maine, the snow we experienced was never more than a couple inches. A push broom was enough to clear sidewalks, etc.

Now after 7 years, the biggest 'dump' we have seen here has been 14 inches. More common is 4 to 8 inches per storm.

If you do a lot of mudding [off-road driving], then you will need 4WD and a winch. [Preferably a second 4WD to tow the first 4WD and a handsome wench]

I live alongside a river. The river makes fog. When the pavement is below freezing, the fog will settle and form a layer of 'black ice' on the pavement. 'Black ice' only forms in specific areas and during certain conditions. If you live in a place where 'black ice' does not happen, then you might possibly never experience it. If you live near a body of water, then you might experience it a dozen times every winter. Since we live near a river, we use studded tires on our vehicle.

The only time that undercarriage clearance has been an issue for us, has been immediately after a storm, and in our driveway. The roads are kept very clear. Since I have a tractor with a snow-blower on it, I can clear my driveway quickly and without any strain.

If you plan to stay on pavement, then I see no true 'need' for 4WD or AWD in Maine. I also do not see much purpose in focusing on high clearance. Unless of course your plan is to do a lot of off-road mudding.

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Old 07-22-2013, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Leipzig, Germany
84 posts, read 78,070 times
Reputation: 24
We haven't an ambition to do anything hazardous or too much out-the-way; but would, to see most parts of Maine and, maybe, some surrounding states. And to be equipped to the extent that we shan't have continual anxieties about our car getting us stuck in bad weather, would be important for us. And, with a little experience to draw-on, I rather enjoy driving on ice or through snow. And, for its less unpredictable handling, an rwd- is better than a fwd-car for me. The balance of the vehicle, which is surprisingly good on my new estate car (`combiŽ) is important too. Unfortunately, US vehicle regulations would preclude us from bringing a German-specified car with us

Last edited by BoCosmo; 07-22-2013 at 08:49 AM..
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Old 07-22-2013, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Maine
6,055 posts, read 11,438,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
If you do a lot of mudding [off-road driving], then you will need 4WD and a winch. [Preferably a second 4WD to tow the first 4WD and a handsome wench]
Mudding and driving on unpaved road are not the same thing. Mudding, unless you own the land, will get you a date with the judge. Tearing up someone's property isn't a hobby, it's criminal.
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Old 07-22-2013, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Bangor Maine
3,442 posts, read 5,617,248 times
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You are the very first person that I have ever seen post that they "enjoy driving" on ice. Not for me for sure. On ice you are not in control so it's very scary. I have lived in Maine for over 4 decades and never have had those studded tires. They are a nusiance to me. The roads are usually cleared fairly quickly and then when the sun comes out they are bare until the next snowfall. The law here states they must be removed from the car by a certain date in the early spring, so that requires having 2 sets of tires. As an aside I just learned a couple weeks ago that the Rangeley Inn is up for sale. They are open for overnight guests right now but their restaurant is closed. I hope they find a buyer that will run the restaurant. Haven't been there for years but when we did go it was wonderful.
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Old 07-22-2013, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,678 posts, read 6,784,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
If you plan to stay on pavement, then I see no true 'need' for 4WD or AWD in Maine. I also do not see much purpose in focusing on high clearance. Unless of course your plan is to do a lot of off-road mudding.
Sub, I don't usually disagree with you, but I will here. Not all of the roads get cleared all that well, or quickly, and having the 4wd can make driving in the crap a heck of a lot easier. I've driven without it, and with it, and I have to say that having it is a lot better than not.
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Old 07-22-2013, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Leipzig, Germany
84 posts, read 78,070 times
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Driving on ice can be fun, Newdaawn, especially if your car's handling is predictable; and it needn't be dangerous. More by luck than skill, I've never got trapped in ice or snow. However, one thing I wouldn't do again is to cycle on ice with a glass-like surface. Goodness knows how I managed that in my early teens, with so many heavy textbooks to carry that two satchels were hung, one from each side of the handlebars. And I went that way despite having a free bus pass, and suffering the occasional accident. Now having a two-wheel-drive bicycle would be nice
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Old 07-22-2013, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,708 posts, read 49,503,410 times
Reputation: 19152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zymer View Post
Sub, I don't usually disagree with you, but I will here. Not all of the roads get cleared all that well, or quickly, and having the 4wd can make driving in the crap a heck of a lot easier. I've driven without it, and with it, and I have to say that having it is a lot better than not.
Fair enough. I do see a lot of differences from one region of Maine to another.

Maybe this county has a 'better' snowplow contract? I assume it is down by county for the UTs.

Organized Towns do it themselves, and goodness each township seems to be completely different from the next township when it comes to services.
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Old 07-22-2013, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,708 posts, read 49,503,410 times
Reputation: 19152
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoCosmo View Post
Driving on ice can be fun, Newdaawn, especially if your car's handling is predictable; and it needn't be dangerous. More by luck than skill, I've never got trapped in ice or snow. However, one thing I wouldn't do again is to cycle on ice with a glass-like surface. Goodness knows how I managed that in my early teens, with so many heavy textbooks to carry that two satchels were hung, one from each side of the handlebars. And I went that way despite having a free bus pass, and suffering the occasional accident. Now having a two-wheel-drive bicycle would be nice
I used to have a motorcycle as my only vehicle, I drove it year-round in Ct. [at least for whenever I was in port] It was fun shoveling that out of the snow. Bike tires get hotter than car tires do, and every time I parked it, the ice under the tires would melt a little. Then later refreeze gripping the tires.
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Old 07-22-2013, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Leipzig, Germany
84 posts, read 78,070 times
Reputation: 24
The news about the Rangeley Inn coming onto the market may have inspired me
I was thinking of sending my wife out to work, you know. And running the restaurant might keep her occupied
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