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Old 12-19-2007, 05:48 PM
 
Location: York Village, Maine
455 posts, read 1,089,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elston View Post
In years past when we lived in a neigborhood where there were kids; I used to go out Christmas Eve Night late before I wnt to bed and jingle some sleighbells for kids to think they heard santa as they were sleeping.
My Dad always did that for us when we were little, for our children when they were little and now for our children's children. Thanks for reminding me.
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Old 12-19-2007, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
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Since I was in college (1962) Christmas has always included someone, usually me reading aloud, Dylan Thomas' "A Child's Christmas in Wales" it could just as easily been entitled "A Child's Christmas in Maine" it is so nostagic it is like a blurred watercolor painting of childhood memories. My kids all had their favorite lines....such as, "I made a snowman and my brother knocked it down,and then I knocked my brother down and then we had tea." Because they knew how much I loved it and how much it was part of my Christmas, they always found time to gather and sit while I read, and introduced their girlfriends to the tradition.

I particularly like the memory of the poet at the end of the long and eventful day of celebration, "Looking through my bedroom window, out into the moonlight and the unending smoke-colored snow, I could see the lights in the windows of all the other houses on our hill and hear the music rising from them up the long, steadily falling night. I turned the gas down, I got into bed. I said some words to the close and holy darkness, and then I slept."

Nice memories!
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Old 12-19-2007, 08:58 PM
 
1,961 posts, read 4,172,072 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elston View Post
Since I was in college (1962) Christmas has always included someone, usually me reading aloud, Dylan Thomas' "A Child's Christmas in Wales" it could just as easily been entitled "A Child's Christmas in Maine" it is so nostagic it is like a blurred watercolor painting of childhood memories.
I particularly like the memory of the poet at the end of the long and eventful day of celebration, "Looking through my bedroom window, out into the moonlight and the unending smoke-colored snow, I could see the lights in the windows of all the other houses on our hill and hear the music rising from them up the long, steadily falling night. I turned the gas down, I got into bed. I said some words to the close and holy darkness, and then I slept."



Nice memories!
Oh elston, I just saw that at Borders last week! Such a beautiful small paperback with block cut illustrations. What a lovely story and text- you are quite right- it could easily have been entitiled " A Child's Christmas in Maine!!""
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Old 12-19-2007, 09:07 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moughie View Post
Oh elston, I just saw that at Borders last week! Such a beautiful small paperback with block cut illustrations. What a lovely story and text- you are quite right- it could easily have been entitiled " A Child's Christmas in Maine!!""

I have a very small paper bound copy that I have had for many years and a hard bound copy with wonderful block prints, that my kids gave to me.
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Old 12-19-2007, 09:08 PM
 
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The book is truly a treasure.
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Old 12-19-2007, 11:47 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
38,471 posts, read 18,239,175 times
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Our Christmas' were very family oriented, and the LOVE was palpable. When I was little and Dad was a country preacher, we really didnt have much--Mom literally made some of our clothes out of grain sacks and altered and mended from the rummage sales. (That never hurt us!)

Santa always came and there were predictable gifts in the stocking: a shiny penny in the toe, followed by a tangerine (for many years that was the only time we had citrus all year); a small tube of toothpaste and a new toothbrush; a pencil; some little toys like those woven pink and green tubes that you put your fingers in and when you pulled them out the tube constricted, or puzzel games like interlocking rings that you had to find the way to untangle them, or the plastic trays with sliding tiles that you had to arrange using the free space to move them in the right order--foil wrapped chocolate coins, and a candy cane. Oh Mexican jumping beans--you held them in the warmth of your hand and suddenly they began to wiggle and then to jump!

Those were the basics, anything else was pure joy. As years went by and Dad got bigger churches we all became a bit more sophisticated and gifts took on an international flare, ebony carvings of antelope, and primitive electronic gagets that never worked! Mom often knit us sweaters--she was not a knitter so the fit of the sweaters was often less than perfect but every knit and purl was tangible love straight from her to us.

As a little kid I would go shopping for gifts for my parents and brother and sister with maybe 3 or 4 dollars. Mom pretty routinely got a bottle of "Evening in Paris" cologne (I can still see the blue bottle) and Dad got Old Spice or Bay Rum or something inexpensive from Woolworths or Kresgie's hardware department. (some thing like a package of nails or fasteners that he had no use for but was within my budget.) Grammy got Jergens Lotion honey and almond!

What we made or bought and secretly wrapped and sneaked under and behind the tree for others in the family was really what made us joyful.

When Santa splurged and brought really big gifts, once an aquarium, once a bike, that was momentous and always truly unexpected and unanticipated.

Last edited by elston; 12-20-2007 at 12:38 AM.. Reason: economy of words needed to be observed
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Old 12-20-2007, 03:55 AM
 
Location: santa fe,nm
121 posts, read 279,737 times
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Default The Jewish Christmas

OK here's ours, when we lived in California we had heard that the perfect day to go to Disneyland was Christmas. Well apparently every other Jew within 200 miles had heard the same thing! The place was jam packed. It was great! We were all in the same boat, so to speak. It was crazy but we did this for years.
Here in Santa Fe on Christmas day 8 to 10 families get together and go to the movies (This year it's Sweeney Todd). We usually have the theatre all to ourselves. After we all come back to our house and have Margaritas, blue corn chips and salsa, Green Chile Stew, tamales and red chile, posole, spanish rice, frijoles, bizcochitos and mexican hot chocolate. We end the evening pretty early and all meet early the next morning to hit the after Christmas sales.
I am looking forward to making new traditions when we get to Maine!

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Old 12-20-2007, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Maine
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sounds like a wonderful time SantaFe! Yummy!
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Old 12-20-2007, 10:13 AM
 
Location: FINALLY IN MAINE!!!!!
175 posts, read 373,903 times
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I remember one time when I was about 13 and my brother was 8 , he had $5.00 and went down to our local grocery store to buy gifts for my Parents and me. We have two older sisters, but they were married and lived elsewhere. So he rode his bike down to the store and bought gifts for us.
I remember on Christmas day, when we opened up our gifts he handed us the ones he had bought for us. He bought my dad a stapler, one of those kind that wouldn't staple two pieces of paper together, My Mom got a Fly Swatter and I a pair of scissors. We kinda laughed under our breath, but it was the sweetest thing. We gave him hugs and kisses. He took his allowance money and went out on his own and bought us all something. It was really special. Now him and I will joke around about it, and I tell him I am about due for a new pair of scissors.
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Old 12-20-2007, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Corinth, ME
2,712 posts, read 4,924,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mainewannabe View Post
We don't like anyone to be alone. If we know folks who ARE we drop by with food and such for them. Sometimes they don't seem to like it. Maybe they are upset that someone notices they are alone? Afterwards they always tell us that it was the nicest thing that happened to them but at the time ... at first we wondered if we were doing the right thing ... it's not comfortable to do so as it used to be. Or maybe it never was???
As someone who IS alone and feeling very lonely this year on account of it, I feel I must share thoughts here. Even if it is uncomfortable -- for both sides at -- at times, do it anyway!

I think what is going on, are mixed feelings... and that is ok. Maybe they are not upset that you noticed so much as upset because they ARE alone and your visit reminds them that, once you leave, they will be again? But that is not a reason to change your habit!

Maybe you need to visit more often ... after and before the holidays, as well? The more cynical may be caught by the passing thought that they are recipients of "obligatory holiday charity".

I would say that the season itself calls us to draw together and that as the year turns the summer calls us to busyness in the world, but that even as we are making and doing in the light of the longer days we must remember our human connections.

Stop by in May with a flowering plant, and in August with produce to share (might help avoid the "car stuffed with zucchini" phenomenon? LOL) and in autumn as well to lend a hand with winter preparations if needed. AND at Yule with cookies and cheer.
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