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Old 12-28-2007, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
38,423 posts, read 18,180,970 times
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OMG I havent seen the Mother Earth News since the 60's! LOL want to build a yurt of a solar oven or hay bale house???? I used to love that mag. Havent even thought of it in years.
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Old 12-28-2007, 12:43 PM
 
Location: York Village, Maine
455 posts, read 1,087,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elston View Post
OMG I havent seen the Mother Earth News since the 60's! LOL want to build a yurt of a solar oven or hay bale house???? I used to love that mag. Havent even thought of it in years.
My hubby (Bert) actually thought about a Yurt. LOL I was a tad bit nervous about it to say the least...but, I would go along with him no matter what. He really is full of "Yankee ingenuity" LOL!!!! He Loves that mag. He also wants to do the solar thing, and anything else that would take you back to living as low cost as possible. He is actually good at it too. His family is also from Maine and his step father was a Canadian Indian. So....He has LOTS of ideas. "oh goodie.. I do love him though!!!
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Old 12-28-2007, 12:45 PM
 
Location: York Village, Maine
455 posts, read 1,087,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elston View Post
OMG I havent seen the Mother Earth News since the 60's! LOL want to build a yurt of a solar oven or hay bale house???? I used to love that mag. Havent even thought of it in years.
My hubby (Bert) actually thought about a Yurt. LOL I was a tad bit nervous about it to say the least...but, I would go along with him no matter what. He really is full of "Yankee ingenuity" LOL!!!! He Loves that mag. He also wants to do the solar thing, and anything else that would take you back to living as low cost as possible. He is actually good at it too. His family is also from Maine and his step father was a Canadian Indian. So....He has LOTS of ideas. You gotta love him though!!!
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Old 12-28-2007, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
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We sent in our order with Fedco-trees This past Fall to put in a small apple orchard.

16 apple trees: Two varieties selected for sugar content, four trees each; and four vareitys selected for acid content [needed for making hard cider], 2 trees each.

Eight sweet apple trees and eight sour apple trees, with harvesting spread out from Fall through to Winter.

We avoided all of the Summer varieties, and tried to avoid having all apples coming into harvest all at once.

4- 'Sweet 16 Apples': harvested Early Fall.
Whenever anyone eats a Sweet 16 for the first time, you know they will be surprised. Fine-textured crisp flesh contains an astounding unusually complex combination of sweet nutty and spicy flavors with slight anise essence, sometimes described as cherry, vanilla or even bourbon. Truly excellent fresh eating, although it is too sweet for some pallets. Round-conic bronze-red medium-sized fruit, striped and washed with rose-red.

2- 'Prima Apples': harvested Fall.
Medium-large roundish fruit has rich yellow skin with a striking orange-red blush. Mildly subacid juicy white flesh provides excellent eating and makes good cider. Keeps a couple of months.

4- 'Minnesota 447 apples': harvested Fall-Winter.
Developed at the University of Minnesota before 1936, but never introduced. This massively flavored dessert apple—not for the faint of heart—provides a whole new level of culinary experience. Likely the most distinctive and unusual apple I’ve ever tried. Astonished friends have described its flavor as strange, molasses, olives, fabulous, sweet, complex and sugar cane. The roundish fruit is medium-sized and entirely covered with dark bluish-purple stripes. The aromatic crisp crystalline flesh is an apricot-orange color with occasional red staining, so juicy it’ll run down your hand. Years ago David Bedford of the University of Minnesota said they would never release it because it didn’t taste like an apple. Joyfully they changed their minds.

2- 'Cortland Apples': harvested Fall-Winter
Medium to medium-large slightly ribbed dull red fruit with a purple blush. Excellent eating and cooking. Slow-oxidizing white flesh is very good in salads; fine-grained, crisp, tender, juicy. Produces a surprisingly delightful cider, fresh or fermented, in a mix or even on its own. Vigorous tall upright spreading tree with reddish bark. Annual producer of heavy crops.

2- 'Esopus Spitzenburg apples': harvested Fall-Winter.
Without peer in flavor and quality. A choice dessert and culinary apple, mentioned in nearly every list of best-flavored varieties. Slightly subacid, crisp and juicy. Famous for being Thomas Jefferson’s favorite apple. Medium-large bright-red round to mostly conic fruit, covered with russet dots. Excellent acid source for sweet or fermented cider.
Bears moderate crops.

2- 'Golden Russet apples': harvested Winter
The champagne of cider apples, ripening late in fall, when the root cellar has finally cooled off and the best cider is ready to be made: sweet, balanced, thick and smooth. Also recommended as a “sharp” acid source for fermented cider. Excellent eating; keeps all winter and well into spring. Round medium-sized hard fruit; uniform in size and shape, softens as winter progresses but maintains its superior sweet flavor. Solid deep yellow golden russeted skin!
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Old 12-28-2007, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Corinth, ME
2,712 posts, read 4,914,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elston View Post
OMG I havent seen the Mother Earth News since the 60's! LOL want to build a yurt of a solar oven or hay bale house???? I used to love that mag. Havent even thought of it in years.
The published me year and YEARS and YEARS ago! LOL I have not subscribed for years, but my friend K does... and while he is out on his odyssey, his issues are coming here.

Gardening is also one of the things that draws ME to Maine... I have gardened everywhere I have lived since I was a kid in MI..and here on the coast of NC is the only place I have not had success. I even "got" the two seasons in SoCal the first year I lived there, after growing up in the North!

You can be sure I will be collecting info from this thread, as I know varieties can make a BIG difference between success and failure with lots of crops. I usually start my warm season stuff from seed, but have never worked with cold frames or the like though I did build a large solar greenhouse attached to my eastern WA state home, that I wrote about in Backwoods Home Mag many years ago as well... it was made from PVC and contractor plastic and worked quite well for that climate
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Old 12-28-2007, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Florida&Eastport
612 posts, read 1,063,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Abbymoulton View Post
Attachment 12261 OH MY.....I found a MOOSE in my garden in Florida this afternoon.
I guess I have to bring him back to Maine.
Abby,
I love the Moose...don't forget to bring him to Maine. It is great to see this thread. I love to garden and grow flowers. The weather has been so unpredictable that my Easter Lilies are 3 inches above the ground. Duh!! I have Scottish roses in blues and reds that love cooler climate and have beautiful blooms now. I too miss the crocus and daffodils of winter and spring. I did not have good luck with growing a garden in the soil here in Florida...so I container garden...tomatoes, peppers, cukes, strawberries, etc. Then I have an herbal garden with curly and flat leaf italian parsleys, greek oregano, sweet basil, thyme, rosemary, dill, chives and mint.

I look forward to planting a vegetable garden in Maine in the soil. I noticed that we have some apple trees on our property. I intend on planting a rose garden and flowers too.
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Old 12-28-2007, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
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We also built four garlic beds.

One for Chesnok Red garlic, one for Italian Purple, one for Giant Elephant, and one for commercial white.

We want to try a braid with all four varieties. Reds on one side of the braid, Purples on the opposite side, a row of whites in the middle and one Giant Elephant on the end.
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Old 12-28-2007, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Maine
5,054 posts, read 10,929,364 times
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Wonderful thread, Elston! I can't wait to get up there and be able to start gardening. I used to help with my grandparents garden every summer and have some very fond memories of those times with them.
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Old 12-28-2007, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Central NH
1,004 posts, read 2,013,104 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elston View Post
LOL want to build a yurt of a solar oven or hay bale house????
As a matter of fact I have built (as part of a crew) a hay bale house in Crested Butte CO. My family regularly uses solar ovens while on camping/canoeing/hiking trips. As for the yurt, I have not built one but DW and I have talked about a yurt village with a large central yurt for family room, dining and kitchen area with smaller attached yurts for bedrooms.
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Old 12-28-2007, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Arlington Virginia
4,538 posts, read 7,980,924 times
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Default Tomatoes Growing in Maine?

Do tomatoes grow well in Maine. I'm guessing yes from the previous posts, re cold frames, etc. I have started tomato seeds in peat pots under a light in a kitchen window in March. Tomatoes are part of my yearly cycle since I was a little kid.

Also I'm (hoping) guessing yes from a Maine Forum post some months ago regarding locking one's doors. The one caution from that thread said that if you didn't keep your car doors locked in summer, you would find the back seat full of zucchini
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