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Old 01-01-2008, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Corinth, ME
2,712 posts, read 4,914,210 times
Reputation: 1863

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Writer View Post
It's not much shorter Abby. You can stretch the season on both ends with a little Yankee Ingenuity and working the soil as early as it's ready.
Hey, cool. I can DO that! I always push the season and almost always win... but still I count the early and late stuff as "bonus" plantings. Folks who don't understand that some things can stand more cold than others think I am nuts... somewhere I have a picture of 4" tall leaf lettuces -- healthy thinning size for early salads -- standing with their tops barely protruding above the snow in CO. Neighbor who "commiserated" with me over the "loss" of my crop just scratched his head when, a couple days later and after the snow had melted, I was out picking it.

If course when I used to plant 250 tomato plants each year (mostly for sauce, but a goodly number for eating and canning whole too) and a frost was predicted, I went nuts gathering up enough things to cover them for the night... just about anything that would not blow away was fair game. And then in the morning, came the timing act of getting them uncovered after it warmed up sufficiently and before they baked!
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Old 01-01-2008, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Corinth, ME
2,712 posts, read 4,914,210 times
Reputation: 1863
Quote:
Originally Posted by elston View Post
When we get settled in somewhere in Maine..."kalee kalay oh joyous day"...how do we find such a farm or coop? Is there a listing?
When I was in the Bangor area this fall I was AMAZED by the number of farms and farm stands I "just happenend" by in my wanderings. I stopped at a goodly number to visit and pick up a bit of this or that, but I expect that when I get there, what I am not growing will not be hard to find without a whole lot of searching. Most of what I saw seemed to be folks selling their surplus and most were also touting some level of "naturalness"... as in "unsprayed," "no chemical fertilizers," etc.
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Old 01-01-2008, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Maine
5,969 posts, read 11,130,579 times
Reputation: 5240
A lot of greens are excellent for cold weather growing. The younger leaves have more pliable cell walls that don't burst when the leaf freezes. You just have to know what to grow and when to get it planted (late August/early September in my area) so that it's well established before the days are very short and the nights below 20*. I have trash bags of sheets to throw over a few vegetables when there's a frost warning. First frost at my house last year was Sept 6. Ouch. I didn't pay attention to the warning and it got me.
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Old 01-01-2008, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Florida&Eastport
612 posts, read 1,063,234 times
Reputation: 586
MW...what types of greens do you grow in Maine other than lettuce?

Last edited by Eastport4me; 01-01-2008 at 08:36 PM.. Reason: change of word.
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Old 01-02-2008, 04:44 AM
 
Location: Maine
5,969 posts, read 11,130,579 times
Reputation: 5240
Beet greens - one variety for large leaf, one for baby. Tatsoi, boc choi, turnip, spinach, Swiss chard, escarole, mustard, kale, mizuna, arugula, mache, sorrel and radish. Radish leaves are a spicy.
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Old 01-02-2008, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Virginia (soon Ellsworth)
653 posts, read 1,677,626 times
Reputation: 327
kitchen garden variaties that doing well at location and when to grow them is very valuable for new comer.
USDA zonning guildline is good, but not as good as local experiences.
thanks in advance.
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Old 01-02-2008, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Florida&Eastport
612 posts, read 1,063,234 times
Reputation: 586
Thank you MW. I like to saute' fresh greens with fresh garlic & virgin olive oil. I cook them year round here in Florida and enjoy a fresh spinach salad. Do you have a greenhouse and if so, what do you grow in the winter?
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Old 01-02-2008, 08:33 AM
 
Location: York Village, Maine
455 posts, read 1,087,606 times
Reputation: 390
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Writer View Post
Beet greens - one variety for large leaf, one for baby. Tatsoi, boc choi, turnip, spinach, Swiss chard, escarole, mustard, kale, mizuna, arugula, mache, sorrel and radish. Radish leaves are a spicy.
Oh how I love Swiss Chard. All the greens are great and finding the dandilion greens is just fun. But, the thing that just takes the cake and is so wicked good.............FIDDLEHEADS, YUMMMMMMMIE
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Old 01-02-2008, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
38,422 posts, read 18,177,990 times
Reputation: 46306
This is probably heresy, but I want to ask anyway. Some years ago I heard that fiddleheads were carcinogenic and should be avoided. I can tell that people on this forum don't put stock in that warning. What do you know that I don't? Just wondering--not trying to slam a regional favorite!
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Old 01-02-2008, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Florida&Eastport
612 posts, read 1,063,234 times
Reputation: 586
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abbymoulton View Post
Oh how I love Swiss Chard. All the greens are great and finding the dandilion greens is just fun. But, the thing that just takes the cake and is so wicked good.............FIDDLEHEADS, YUMMMMMMMIE
I will have to try both when I get to Maine. There is a recipe in the cookbook...Cooking Down East by Marjorie Standish that I would like to try. First I have to find a river or stream where they grow during the month of May. I read that Fiddlehead greens are a Maine delicacy. I also read they can be found in markets, either fresh or frozen and have a high price!! I would like to try them even if they are pricey.
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