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Old 01-05-2008, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Virginia (soon Ellsworth)
653 posts, read 1,679,068 times
Reputation: 327

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Quote:
via government surplus auction
forest, is there a goverment surplus location in Maine, is it open to public?. (none military person)
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Old 01-05-2008, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,738 posts, read 47,539,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boonskyler View Post
forest, is there a goverment surplus location in Maine, is it open to public?. (none military person)
Sadly no, not that I am aware of.

My DW works on base. Her civilian managers had a bunch of stuff that was left over from doing an up-grade, it was getting in the way. She asked about how they were going to dispose of it. They were supposed to ship it all to Virginia, but they told her that she could submit a sealed bid to them and they would send it to the right office in Virginia. The bandsaw's original invoice was for $5,000. We received notice a week later that we now owned two pallets of stuff, so remove it.

'Right place at the right time' and we walked away with a sweet deal.

There is a private store that does market some 'military surplus' out on the edge of Brewer next to the Super Walmart. I recently picked up some wool work pants there for $12, these are part of an Army dress uniform so they look really nice. And three pairs of Army issue 'arctic conditions' mittens, they are real nice too. I gave one pair to KAF's hubby [he shovels snow for a living in the win-tah, I figured that he could use them].

They also stock snowshoes for cheap, arctic boots, and animal traps. Class three firearms if anyone has a need.



Ooops before I forget: "Goats"
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Old 01-05-2008, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Virginia (soon Ellsworth)
653 posts, read 1,679,068 times
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Quote:
They were supposed to ship it all to Virginia
thanks, i will find out where is in Virginia. can not beat military surplus quality and price.

well let people get back to Goats.
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Old 01-05-2008, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,738 posts, read 47,539,222 times
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Each of our goats needed hoof trimming when we got them. And I trimmed their hoofs.

Looking at them today, only one of them is starting to look like she may need a touch-up.

I think that our goats seem to get enough running around done even with this snow, that for the most part they are keeping their hooves in shape.
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Old 01-05-2008, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Durham NC-for now
303 posts, read 1,291,474 times
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Default What do you sell Forest?

Hey Forest what do you sell at the farmer's markets?
I've semi-joked about getting goats to provide milk for my 4 growing boys and to mow the grass and eat garbage. Looks like they eat trees though, so maybe not!
We couldn't do the raising for slaughter thing. My guys all have the romantic farm idea of loving romping friendly animals. Chickens for eggs or something for milk would be good though.
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Old 01-05-2008, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,738 posts, read 47,539,222 times
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The Maine Cheese-makers guild is looking for more members. Every member of the guild that I have spoken with milks and cheeses fulltime, and they sell-out all their cheese every week. None of them wish to expand their operations. Maine tourism somebody has been trying to get the guild to increase production so they can begin marketing via the WWW. Grants are available.

If you like goats, and wish to milk, that would be one avenue to consider.

We milked 16 goats when we were in college, we have no further desire to do that. We will not be milking any animal again. However you are more than welcome to [edited] milk as much as you wish to.

I market eggs, fiddleheads and hopefully veggies.
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Old 01-05-2008, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Durham NC-for now
303 posts, read 1,291,474 times
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Default Forest, So what do you do with your goats?

Is there something distasteful about milking goats? Do they have milking machines? Is it chevre that is most commonly made?
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Old 01-05-2008, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Corinth, ME
2,712 posts, read 4,918,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moxie View Post
Is there something distasteful about milking goats? Do they have milking machines? Is it chevre that is most commonly made?
yes, there are goat milking machines... but I have never seen one in use and my friend who had a "large" herd (around 20 in milk most of the time) thought they were too expensive. Everyone I know milks by hand, 2x a day... I have milked lots of goats and a cow or two and give me the goats any day! But I have smaller hands... that may make a difference.

I used to make cheddar.. and a sort of ricotta... and butter... but then I also had a cream separator (goat cream does NOT separate out easily like cow cream does!) The main thing about milking ... no matter what the critter... is that it ties you to the place thoroughly... they need milking twice a day, at the same time each day and preferably 12 hours apart. No weekends off... lots of hurry home trips to make it in time for milking. They need the regularity for maximum output and to avoid too much engorgement (getting too full of milk) that can lead to problems.
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Old 01-05-2008, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Maine
5,969 posts, read 11,141,994 times
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No, yes and probably. Having milked both, I'd rather milk 100 goats than one cow. I have a couple of DeLeval milkers but seldom used them. It's faster for me to milk by hand than to clean the equipment.
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Old 01-05-2008, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Maine
5,969 posts, read 11,141,994 times
Reputation: 5241
You can separate kids from does at night, milk in the morning and put them back together for the day. It eliminates the evening milking. Or separate them for the day, milk at night and put them back together to eliminate the morning milking. Milk producers continue to produce 24/7. As long as the doe isn't a low producer she'll provide plenty of milk for house and kid. If she's nursing more than one kid I wouldn't take more than half the milk she has at the time of milking.
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