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Old 01-06-2008, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cape Codder View Post
I just may be taking you up on that Forest. Thank you.

Silly question...do all goats have to be milked?
No.

Commonly at a dairy, you may remove the kids or calves from the mothers at birth, so they do not consume your milk if milk is your primary product.

When I as little, we used to buy 'drop calves', calves taken from their mothers at birth [we would feed them powdered milk substitute called 'calf manna']. The only purpose in having the cows give birth was to increase their daily milk production. It is called 'freshening', to re-freshen their production.

On the other hand, if you did not want to be milking, you do not have to.

Just let nature handle things. A momma drops a baby and generally will have the ability to let it nurse.

KAF's nanny with her day-old bucklings, is not producing enough milk to feed two babies. So KAF stepped in and now needs to milk twice a day, and to add to that milk powdered milk to increase the volume of milk. Then she is bottle feeding those two babes. On the way home from church this afternoon we stopped by to see how they are doing. and we got to bottle feed KAF's two bucklings. Very cute!

So anyway you do have lots of options. And sometimes nature will have it's own idea of what should happen.

Like that buck that died on us with the first snow dump. It was a runt, it never got enough milk early enough to put on enough growth, so it was always small. When cold weather finally came, it just did not have the development it needed to survive. I brought it inside everyday to privately feed him grain for months, but it was not enough to make up for what had happened in it's first week.
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Old 01-06-2008, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CapeCodder View Post
LOL...can you kinda tell I'm clueless? I still want them though!

Ok...so if I got a baby female and she never bred (breeded? mated? sigh) then she wouldn't need milking?
Not always.

Two of the girls that a neighbor sold this past fall, where 'never bred'. But she got the call this past week that both girls are prego.

As it turns out this neighbor's bucks are 'overly eager', they bred the girls through the fence.

All while my buck is not sure of how things work and has not bred anything.
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Old 01-06-2008, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
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Daily feeding takes ten minutes twice a day in the winter.

In the summer it takes me once a day to call them into their pen and feed them, maybe ten minutes.

In the summers sometimes my goats get into their heads that they want to walk up and down the road way. They stay in the ditches, but it bothers traffic, so I have to chase after them and call them to return home.

If I tether them, I have to check on them hourly. Some goats will relax and just eat a circle as far as they can reach. Other goats freak out on a tether, and will fight it until either the tether breaks or they are dead. This past summer I had four goats who fought their tethers until they finally had twisted the chain enough to twist their dog collars to finally strangle themselves. Some goats are great on a tether, other goats do not have a good tether mentality.

Our nanny now will fight a tether. If she is tethered she will not eat, she will cry and cry, she will pull at the tether and try to pull it loose.

So tethered goats need to be checked on hourly.

When our goats go into the forest, gorge themselves, and come back to the house to chew their cud; in that routine, they will cycle back and forth all day, and they need no real attention. Other than when I bring them in in the evening and feed them grain.

Our goats need their hooves trimmed maybe twice a year, in an hour I can do a dozen goats easily.

If you are out with the goats, you can see if any of them are coughing, limping, sneezing, etc.

Hitting an animal with penicillin or whatever is easy and takes very little time.
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Old 01-06-2008, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Maine
5,969 posts, read 11,132,103 times
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If you're trying to do things as naturally as possible watch the ingredients on milk replacer. Many use blood as a protein source. Normally, offspring do not drink blood. The thought of how many kids I fed replacer to before I knew about blood is disturbing. I had no idea. If it came from the feed store it must be ok, right? Or not.
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Old 01-08-2008, 06:24 PM
 
411 posts, read 790,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bignhfamily View Post
KAF you might want to check out King Auther Tools online. They have a wood carving tool called a Merlin that they sell with a couple of accessorries to make it a great hoof trimming tool. Its more money than hand trimmers but I love it as I can use it as a hoof trimmer or use it to hollow out burl bowls, spoons, etc.
Thanks for the info, will check that out. Sorry it's taken so long to get back here, we've got two bottle babies now. lol
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Old 01-08-2008, 06:39 PM
 
411 posts, read 790,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Writer View Post
If you're trying to do things as naturally as possible watch the ingredients on milk replacer. Many use blood as a protein source. Normally, offspring do not drink blood. The thought of how many kids I fed replacer to before I knew about blood is disturbing. I had no idea. If it came from the feed store it must be ok, right? Or not.
I don't use milk replacer as a norm anymore. We aren't feeding it now at all... Forest must have heard me wrong. We are using whole cow's milk w/vitamin D added, and mixing in mom's milk. Currently they are at a 50/50 mix, and that will gradually be changed to all cow's milk as we start milking mom for us down the road. Probably when they are about 2 weeks old. Then till they are about a month or so it's straight cow's milk, then at that point, when they are a bit bigger and stronger I will be mixing in some milk replacer that is NOT blood-based. I had heard about this about a year ago, and stopped using the brand I was using, and switched. That really disturbed me as well Robin.
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Old 01-08-2008, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Maine
7,728 posts, read 10,811,809 times
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Any baby pics KAF?
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Old 01-08-2008, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
Reputation: 17565
My bad, sorry.
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Old 01-08-2008, 06:43 PM
 
411 posts, read 790,556 times
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CapeCodder, you asked about chore time. Two does will take you probably ten minutes tops. We currently are feeding and watering the 10 adult goats we have, the 15 rabbits, scratch that, 14 rabbits, as I butchered one the other day, and 18 chickens in about 30 minutes. Oh yeah, and the 5 barn cats are in there as well. That includes lugging water from the house, feeding, haying the goats, collecting the eggs, and replacing the rabbit's water as it is frozen when we do our chores morning and night. On top of this we are currently milking, so add another 10 minutes or so, she's giving about a quarter gallon day and night, she's a meat goat, so milk production isn't high anyway. And then bottle feeding the boys who live inside now, so add 20 minutes for that. So total time is less than an hour, including barn animals, house animals, and milking. And cleaning equipment. You'll get it down to a science, and an order, and it will go fast! Ask Forest about the ORDER he has to follow in the summer in order to avoid trouble. lol
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Old 01-08-2008, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
Reputation: 17565
Oooh Oooh Oooh

PICTURES!

Can we see pictures?
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