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Old 01-03-2017, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,583 posts, read 2,653,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
Vinyl siding creaks and snaps when the temperatures drop at night.
We are having new vinyl siding put up on the house. Haven't heard any yet.
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Old 01-03-2017, 08:55 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slyfox2 View Post
We are having new vinyl siding put up on the house. Haven't heard any yet.
When nailing vinyl siding, the nail should be in the center of the nailing slot and not too tight. Invariably there will be nails that are too tight against the siding, not allowing it to move with expansion/contraction caused by temperature change. It will also cause that unsightly dimpling that you might see. Eventually, when the pressure to move becomes great enough, it will pop the nail slightly and move. Once it loosens the nail, all should be fine, but it will make some noise when it happens.
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Old 01-03-2017, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,583 posts, read 2,653,718 times
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Haven't seen that unsightly dimpling. But then the work is being done by Mainely Vinyl, which is a very very experienced exterior house contractor. We are having textured vinyl cedar dark blue cedar shakes put on the top. We haven't decided whether to paint the bottom, or put in more vinyl siding boards. We will be doing the trim and will have it in white and the top at least will be aluminum clad over the wood so we don't ever have to et up there again. We're too old to be getting up on ladders.
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Old 01-03-2017, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Maine's garden spot
3,136 posts, read 5,538,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slyfox2 View Post
We are having new vinyl siding put up on the house. Haven't heard any yet.


You will. Ours does. It supposed to.
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Old 01-03-2017, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in deep in Maine
3,583 posts, read 2,653,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinB View Post
You will. Ours does. It's supposed to.
Our installer says that it only does that if its installed wrong. They are very careful when they hammer the nails in so that the vinyl shingles sort of hang on the nails gently and have room for the the vinyl the expand and contract. My installer guy shook his head and said, "Its not rocket science, you know." If they have unsightly bumping then they have to return and re-install the section, and they get docked for that, so the are very very careful with it.
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Old 02-17-2017, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,663 posts, read 14,570,866 times
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OK, this thread is not about siding. It is about ice. We just got between 2 and 4 feet of snow in Maine. That is a great amount of weight on roofs and it behooves building owners to remove that snow or the roof could collapse as happened at the bowling alley in Millinocket. That roof didn't just sag down as sometimes happens, It dropped suddenly and completely in one huge slam. Debris was thrown all the way across the street. Fortunately, nobody was in the building.

Be careful on lakes. We have over a foot of ice on all northern lakes. The weight of snow on the ice pushes down on the ice and water flows out onto the ice and under the snow. We call that "wetting up". The ice is safe to walk on as it was last week, but water is flowing up through ice fishing holes, at outlets where streams run out of the lakes and where streams run into lakes,

When snowmobiling, if you see a grey area in the snowmobile trail, do not stop! Most snowmobiles cannot go in slush. Even where the surface is white with snow, do not stop without riding in a big circle. If the snow is grey in the track you just made, do not stop. Go find a place that has not slushed up. You will save yourself a huge amount of work. Been there. Done that before I knew better.

Last edited by Northern Maine Land Man; 02-17-2017 at 07:46 AM..
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Old 03-07-2017, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Peru, Maine
282 posts, read 234,705 times
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Default Ice is Nice !

Hi Group,


My Wife and I are planning to move to The Pinetree State in 120 days (June 30th) to get out of Connecticut, where I've lived since 1952.


Boy, speaking of 'Ice', here in New Fairfield, CT we are just North of the larger city of Danbury, CT, and we have the large body of water named Candlewood Lake, and smaller Squantz Pond.


This "Winter" neither lakes FROZE enough, to walk on, ice skate, fish etc.


This might be the first time in many years that they didn't freeze.


Is this a sure sign of 'Global Warming' ???


I'd say a resounding 'Yes' to this.


I remember when I was a kid, growing up in Trumbull, CT, which is 20 miles from Long Island Sound, we would have the week off from school after mid-term tests, and to celebrate Christmas.


We kids would be ICE SKATING on Twin Brooks Pond or Pinewood Lake. (!!!)


Down here in 'warming Connecticut' one couldn't ice skate on any outdoor pond or lake, for the last 20+ years, before January, IF you were lucky.


That's one reason that I want to 'head North' to Maine to actually get some W-I-N-T-E-R again.


I LOVE Winter!


This year that Season hasn't really occurred (yet) as far as I'm concerned.


On another topic...


HEY FOLKS.....
* Would anybody on this knowledgeable site know of any Realtors, or sites etc, who might have information about Renting a House, possibly with a Barn (long term/permanently) in Maine?


I'm constantly on 'Zillow' but there aren't many houses for rent in Maine (listed there, at least).


(Here in CT the newspapers are just FILLED with houses to rent.....it's just that the prices they are asking, are just astronomical).


We can afford a $1,000/mo mortgage, but have no down payment, due to ongoing health issues with my Wife.


We'd like to live over on the Northwest side of the state, around Lake Umbagog, Rangeley Lake down to about, say, Rumford.


Any ideas would be extremely appreciated.


I'm looking at my calendar daily, and lay in bed at night wondering how, if, when will we find a nice piece of land and a house in Maine.


Thanks in advance!


CTwoodnutt, (soon to be MEwoodnutt ???)
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Old 03-07-2017, 04:26 PM
 
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Rangeley is pricey. Kingfield is a bit up there, Farmington less so, cheaper stuff in Phillps, Strong, MADdrid (is how you pronounce it) etc. Why NW? Half those rivers are catch and release FFO only. They're doing a HUGE windfarm in Roxbury last I heard. Might find something in the Sugarloaf Irregular (which is online, I believe).
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Old 03-09-2017, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
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I started this thread nine years ago. Quoting myself so I don't wander off topic, "As the old detective used to say on NYPD Blue, "Be careful out there."

In 1983 I walked across Silver Lake on the ice during deer season. It was about 3 inches thick and I could see bubbles under the clear ice. It was the shortest way home. I had tracked a big buck for miles in the snow. The next year I promoted a sled dog race in Lincoln to occur during the second week of February in 1985. I told them that it would bring in about 20 teams, bring the motels, restaurants and gas stations some business and get people out to see something they had never seen before.

The town liked the idea. Mattanawcook Lake is right on Main Street in Lincoln. The race was scheduled for the second week in February. On Christmas Day, 1984, Mattanawcook Lake was wide open from shore to shore. You could have gone water skiing in a wet suit. I thought, "What have I done? Now I have to find woods roads with no snowmobile trails."

On February 1, there was 22 inches of ice on the lake and there were trucks all over the lake. The town loved the races and we had sled dog racing in Lincoln for about ten years "on ice" which is the title of this thread. In 1955 there were books published about the coming ice age. It didn't happen. Around the same time there was a big flurry of famous hurricanes on the East Coast.

The Peruvians have known about El Nino and La Nina for centuries. Weather varies day to day and long term. Last winter was the coldest winter and the most snow ever in central Maine. Except for one blizzard where we had 30 inches of snow in one day, it has been an easy winter this year. Ice boaters came to Maine from all over this winter because of the smooth ice and lack of snow in lower Maine. Along with the ice boaters came skaters who use tractor kites. They turn suddenly into the wind and soar into the air with their paragliders.

Don't worry about global warming. Real data shows a cooling trend for the last 20 years. If you choose the Rangely area, be careful on that lake. Last winter, four snowmobilers rode off onto thin ice and drowned. All lakes have thin ice where rivers run in and out.
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Old 03-09-2017, 07:08 AM
 
14,761 posts, read 4,615,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
Everybody has been told at some time in his life to stay off thin ice. Nobody wants to fall through the ice. It's a thoroughly disagreeable experience and it can kill you.

Newcomers to Maine have a lot to learn about lakes and ice. The most important thing to know is that ice varies in thickness on the same lake for many reasons. The inlets and outlets always have thinner ice because water is flowing under the ice. Many lakes have underwater springs. Water at a temperature of about 50 degrees rises to the surface and can create thin spots or even large open holes. Always ask locals about specific lakes.

Ice floats. It floats because it is lighter than water. When water freezes it expands. The colder it gets the more it expands. Ice in contact with the water below is at 32 degrees. Ice on the surface can be 20 below zero which means it has expanded a lot. When a lake is "making ice" and the ice is expanding the lake booms and cracks. This can be disconcerting when you are walking on a lake. Don't make jokes about your heavy companion. He didn't make the ice crack and boom.

When it snows on lakes the snow provides an insulating layer. Even though it's 20 below the lake may not add thickness as fast as expected. As snow increases in depth and weight it pushes down on the ice. As the ice cracks, water comes up through the crack and spreads out in all directions. Snow absorbs water and it becomes slush. Snowmobiles don't go well in slush. If you are on a snowmobile and encounter slush, apply extra power and try to get across it. If you just spin to a stop you will likely not get out of your predicament without help. There could be two feet of ice under you, but your snowmobile won't go.

If you are following a snowmobile and the first one in line hits slush, spread out. Don't follow him into it. If you have at least one snowmobile on a good surface and you have a long rope you may be able to get everybody going again.

Right now we have about 30 inches of snow on most lakes around here. It's all powder. We had winds of 20 MPH last night an part of today. That dry snow piles into drifts and moves down wind toward the lee shore. I have seen snow piled 15 to 20 feet deep on the lee side of a lake. That's often the east side. Imagine the surprise of the new owners when they come to their camp for the first time in winter and all they see is the top of the chimney sticking up through the snow. Those many tons of snow pushing down on the ice mean that the east side of the lake is more likely to "slush up" as they say.

Late in the season in March or early April the ice begins to thaw from the edges out. It is not uncommon for a lake to have 18 inches of ice off shore, but open water for 10 feet or more out from the shore. Ice fishermen often use ladders or portable bridges to get onto the ice. Small ponds lose their ice first. Large lakes are the last to become ice free. In our area the ice out date on large lakes is often around May 10.

Just because you see a snowmobile track on a lake does not mean the ice is safe. Every year some of those tracks end at a hole in the ice. We lose a few people every year due to snowmobiles going through the ice. These generally involve adult beverages and occur at night. As the old detective used to say on NYPD Blue, "Be careful out there."

Great Post , I hope you don't mind that I bumped this thread but it's good info!
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