Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maine
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-13-2008, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
47,840 posts, read 21,870,215 times
Reputation: 47129

Advertisements

I have read with interest about people who gather fiddleheads, and blueberries, and of course hunting game and even apples (ala the great apple debate in the debt thread)

I am wondering what other foods are growing wild. I am sure there are elderberries and black berries and raspberries.

Does anyone know anything about Wild Mushrooms in Maine. Is there a society that is into mushroom gathering.

I know that it is shrimp season and has been scallop season recently. How about mussels and are there quohogs in Maine.

How about nuts? Are there any wild foods that you harvest and use?

Last edited by elston; 01-13-2008 at 11:44 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-14-2008, 12:32 AM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 9,575,266 times
Reputation: 17323
There are enough apple trees to supply all the apple pies in all the fairs across the country every day of the year. And that's just counting the trees on my property!

Other than those, I found raspberries, wild strawberries and blackberries. There was the single Indian cucumber that that I gobbled up. Thought there would be more, but just found that single one.

I managed to take a picture of an apple tree but my camera didn't catch the true number of apples that it bore. I think there were more apples than leaves on it, and a whole bunch of them on the ground under it.
Attached Thumbnails
Foraging Food from the wilds of Maine-indian-cuke.jpg   Foraging Food from the wilds of Maine-apple-cider-tree.jpg  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2008, 01:38 AM
 
Location: Maine
7,727 posts, read 12,323,231 times
Reputation: 8343
There are many mushrooms including morels and Shhhh-it-ake
Shiitake Mushrooms Morel Mushrooms Porcini Mushrooms Wild Mushrooms
butternuts, beechnuts, and chestnuts also pine nuts
Growing Nuts in New England | How to Grow Nuts in Northern Climates
You can eat the roots of the cat-in-nine tails.
Blackberries, raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, teaberries and cranberries as well as wild grapes, currants and gooseberries are all available.
Autumn olive, mussels, salmon and quahogs. There really is a lot if you know what you're doing.
Autumn Olive (autumnberry) high in lycopene
Edible greens,...
Facts on Edible Wild Greens in Maine
An edible forest in a glass jar - Maine Coast NOW - A Courier Publications Information Source

Last edited by msina; 01-14-2008 at 01:53 AM.. Reason: missing link
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2008, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
47,840 posts, read 21,870,215 times
Reputation: 47129
Wow! Thank you msina!!!!! You are a sourcebook of info. That will keep me busy for awhile! I can't thank you enough.

Not that I expect to cut down on the food bill thru foraging.. ..but I love to know what is edible, and something of the history of local foods that people gathered. There is somethng special about taking somethng from the Bounty of the Earth...that no one planted or tilled or cultivated...that is just part of the interdependant web of which we all are part. To me, food growing wild, free, for the gathering, is evidence of "Grace".

I had forgotten about New England's wild Concord Grapes--when I was a kid, we used to gather them for mom who turned our afternoon of play, into jelly and juice and even Grape Pie.

I am also remembering gathering dandilion greens in the spring (being careful to avoid the bitter flowering ones).

I would really love to learn about mushrooms but without an expert am a bit afraid to trust the picture in a field guide book. I know that Dad used to get puff balls and he always said there are no poisonous imposters to worry about. We also used to gather the coral shaped fungi and mom cooked that. I know that there is an imposter Morel--I picked one once and even though I only tasted a tiny bit....I felt an odd sensation of paralysis in my mouth and throat!!!!!!

I bet some of the sea weeds are edible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2008, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
10,428 posts, read 18,551,923 times
Reputation: 11562
Around the end of September you can canoe down some of our placid streams in natural bogs and gather wild cranberries. Mattagodus and Baskahegan streams come to mind. Some ponds also have them on the shoreline. The Indians used to pull their canoes up under the edges of the bushes and knock the cranberries into the canoe with sticks. Then just scoop them up with a birchbark scoop and put them in baskets. We still do it pretty much the same way.

In the spring we gather fiddleheads. In Quebec they are called tete de viol which translated is head of the violin. Same thing. The fiddle heads are ready about the same time as the lobstermen start their season. Mmmmm good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2008, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Virginia (soon Ellsworth)
653 posts, read 1,909,195 times
Reputation: 328
Quote:
Around the end of September you can canoe down some of our placid streams in natural bogs and gather wild cranberries. Mattagodus and Baskahegan streams come to mind. Some ponds also have them on the shoreline. The Indians used to pull their canoes up under the edges of the bushes and knock the cranberries into the canoe with sticks. Then just scoop them up with a birchbark scoop and put them in baskets. We still do it pretty much the same way.
I think Maine will get me out door and keep me healthy. will i dare that is the question.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2008, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Corinth, ME
2,712 posts, read 5,624,079 times
Reputation: 1868
That sounds SO cool! I am glad that I have a kayak... two person variety even, and I am quit looking forward to doing this!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
Around the end of September you can canoe down some of our placid streams in natural bogs and gather wild cranberries. Mattagodus and Baskahegan streams come to mind. Some ponds also have them on the shoreline. The Indians used to pull their canoes up under the edges of the bushes and knock the cranberries into the canoe with sticks. Then just scoop them up with a birchbark scoop and put them in baskets. We still do it pretty much the same way.

In the spring we gather fiddleheads. In Quebec they are called tete de viol which translated is head of the violin. Same thing. The fiddle heads are ready about the same time as the lobstermen start their season. Mmmmm good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2008, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Virginia (soon Ellsworth)
653 posts, read 1,909,195 times
Reputation: 328
test posting photo
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2008, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Virginia (soon Ellsworth)
653 posts, read 1,909,195 times
Reputation: 328
it works!!, here are more:
previous pic is Monkey brain, we found in the wood near by, it tast like Abalony.
/
this is oyster and it grow wild in this part of VA.
/
moving north wagon
[img]http://lh5.google.com/boonskyler/RmQ...0047.JPG<br />
too cold for the wagon trailer needed.
http://lh5.google.com/boonskyler/RmQ.../s144/home-01%
moving up
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-14-2008, 10:35 AM
 
Location: Virginia (soon Ellsworth)
653 posts, read 1,909,195 times
Reputation: 328
well, beginner luck, it was working first time.i ll try again

too cold for the wagon, trailer needed

moving up

well, it's not working.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:




Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maine
View detailed profiles of:

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top