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Old 12-07-2009, 02:30 PM
 
Location: WV and Eastport, ME
6,175 posts, read 4,705,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmist View Post
Is hot water heated by the oil too or is it electric or gas typically?
Usually by oil. Much of Maine has no residential natural gas, propane is more expensive, and electrical rates are somewhat higher than some parts of the country, and electricity is definitely less reliable.
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Old 12-07-2009, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Waldo County
1,220 posts, read 2,479,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mensaguy View Post
Usually by oil. Much of Maine has no residential natural gas, propane is more expensive, and electrical rates are somewhat higher than some parts of the country, and electricity is definitely less reliable.
I am not sure that this is correct. I think there are many more electric waterheaters than oil burner coils for domestic water heating in Maine.

And certainly electricity is no less reliable than oil, since oil burners rely on electricity to work at all.

What is probably correct is that most electric water heaters last not much more than six or seven years, and then need to be replaced.
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Old 12-07-2009, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Midcoast Maine
4,893 posts, read 7,043,495 times
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Maybe our house is just well insulated, but we were very comfortable without heat from May to Oct. DH and our older daughter are the first to complain if the house feels chilly, and even they were fine with the temp in the house during that time. Of course it all depends on what each household finds comfortable. We usually have the thermostat set at 63 or 64 degrees during heating season. I know a few people who can't fuction if it's not at least 70 degrees in their house...

Last edited by lovemaine; 12-07-2009 at 07:22 PM..
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Old 06-18-2011, 01:40 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,220 times
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Smile Heating a 1500 sq ft house

Lincoln County Maine I have a new 1500 sq ft house - energy star cellulose insulation in the walls, ceiling basement insulated all new energy star appliances. etc etc etc

The only thing I have that is propane is my stove. Washer, dryer, dish washer,
toaster oven, hot water, HVAC, lights etc are all electric

I went for geothermal heat and my electric bill was $200 per month this winter.
In May it was $90 I suspect this is because the geothermal also helped heat the water for showers etc When the heat went off the hot water heater had to do more work. I really don't believe I heated this winter for $110 per month.

Good Luck
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Old 06-20-2011, 03:54 AM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
2,958 posts, read 3,167,413 times
Reputation: 2505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acadianlion View Post
I am not sure that this is correct. I think there are many more electric waterheaters than oil burner coils for domestic water heating in Maine.

And certainly electricity is no less reliable than oil, since oil burners rely on electricity to work at all.

What is probably correct is that most electric water heaters last not much more than six or seven years, and then need to be replaced.
I know this thread is old, but...

Residential electric water heaters have one or two replaceable rods screwed into the tank, these are called 'sacrificial anodes'.

When dissimilar metals are connected by water, an electrolytic reaction occurs which causes corrosion, whichever metal is less 'noble' will be consumed.

The sacrificial anode is 'weaker' than copper or steel and is designed to be consumed instead of the steel of the water heater's tank (which is 'weaker' than copper).

Replacing the anode(s) periodically will extend the life of the electric water heater. (A water heater with a 6-year warranty usually has one anode, a heater with a 12-year warranty usually has two.)

If you fail to replace the anode, and it has been consumed, then your tank will corrode. With 'soft' water (especially if you have a water softening system) the anode will need to be replaced more frequently than with 'hard' water.
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Old 06-20-2011, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Maine
145 posts, read 119,056 times
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I met a guy who is has a 1500 sq. ft. house on Swan's Island. It's super insulated, passive solar and heated at 62 degrees. He used only 14 gallons of oil last winter. I was jealous. We use about 300 gallons, and we think that's good. Now I want a house like his.
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