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Old 03-07-2009, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
21,878 posts, read 28,700,485 times
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During fiddlehead season I only pick maybe two to four 5-gallon buckets a day.

I am not really up for picking all that we have on our land. With picking, cleaning, blanching, vacuum-sealing and freezing.

If anyone did need to pick a few buckets of fiddleheads, you would be welcome.

Now we only have about 5 acres that are producing fiddleheads. So I do not wish to see a multitude of folk stripping the place. For purposes of sustainability I try to leave one frond on each rootstalk.

If anyone wants some for their own pantry, and your not going to take more than 10 buckets.

Your welcome to come here and pick some.
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Old 03-07-2009, 05:05 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
Don't tell your best fiddlehead spots...they are fast disappearing as more habitat is altered every day!
We don't much worry about losing prime fiddle head habitat.
Each year the mighty 'scrog floods the intervales and they are bountiful.
Yum!
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Old 03-07-2009, 06:01 PM
 
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You don't to tell the mushrooms spots, but you post the picture of wild mushrooms.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
Don't tell your best fiddlehead spots...they are fast disappearing as more habitat is altered every day!

I had to can a lot of the frozen mushrooms from last season when our power was out in Jan. I found I like them better canned. Texture suffers but flavor is enhanced.
There are lots of spring holes near us...I think there is watercress in some of the pools. I've got to confirm this spring.
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Old 03-07-2009, 07:49 PM
 
Location: downeast
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i have my grandmothers recipe for violet jam- never made it myself, but always thought it interesting.
downeast we have a lot of rose bushes alongside the roads- we use the blossoms and the rosehips.
one thing i am always reminded of by the herbalists and other wild gatherers i come across is to be careful of what you harvest, not just for safety but more importantly as certain plants become popular there is a tendency to over pick, or not know the growing cycle of a plant and pick at a time it can not reproduce, and then end up wiping out the plant in that area.
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Old 03-07-2009, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Originally Posted by 7th generation View Post
We don't much worry about losing prime fiddle head habitat.
Each year the mighty 'scrog floods the intervales and they are bountiful.
Yum!
I wonder has anyone tried to transplant a fiddle head?

Some of my flood plain has fiddle head and some of it does not. I would rather that more of it was producing food, rather than less of it.
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Old 03-08-2009, 06:16 AM
 
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thier is a walking trail between farmingdale and augusta, along the railroad tracks, and kennebec river, thier are some prime fiddlehead picking spots close by, as a kid, i use to pick garbage bags full
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Old 03-08-2009, 06:54 AM
 
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You can pick currants and enjoy the juice but personally I dislike it.

We have some hops growing here and I never knew why until I read a story my Great-GrandfatherČ wrote about in his 1840 autobiography. It seems his father was a very religious man, but back in 1840 a lot of coastal Maine was growing hops to make beers. Being a religious man he felt that it was wrong for the family to be growing a crop that led to sin. So he had his boys plow the hops up and throw them over the stone wall.

Well apparently they took root there, and still grow to this day...though in the shade and with out cultivation these "wild hops" are not very abundant.

For me its interesting because I have seen these hops growing here for years but never knew where they came from. Last month my wife got in contact with a family member who had this autobiography...and sure enough there was the explanation. Kind of neat family history...
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Old 03-08-2009, 07:08 AM
 
2,303 posts, read 3,910,309 times
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Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
I wonder has anyone tried to transplant a fiddle head?
Quote:
In early May, on a wet day when the plants are just starting to poke out their fiddle heads, transplant a few to pots
ThreeFineFerns.pdf (http://74.125.47.132/search?q=cache:fTJc_O29p60J:www.novaforestalliance .com/media/documents/ThreeFineFerns.pdf+transplanting+fiddle+heads&hl=e n&ct=clnk&cd=4&gl=us - broken link)
Ferns can be propagated from spores but spread best from root stock.
Seems you have to transplant them to identical soils and sun, or lack of.
ThreeFineFerns.pdf (http://74.125.47.132/search?q=cache:fTJc_O29p60J:www.novaforestalliance .com/media/documents/ThreeFineFerns.pdf+transplanting+fiddle+heads&hl=e n&ct=clnk&cd=4&gl=us - broken link)
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Old 03-08-2009, 07:33 AM
RHB
 
1,074 posts, read 1,240,768 times
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We did that cat tail pancake thing ONCE it was horrible...I'd be willing to try again if you want to share your recipe. Son has been reading about them, and we might, MIGHT, try again.

I do the fiddleheads, lambsquarter, and danilions for greens. I did find some good mushrooms last year.

The class sounds interesting, I'm always up for finding more wild foods.
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Old 03-08-2009, 10:24 AM
 
Location: downeast
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i had a neighbor in livermore falls that had a small fiddlehead garden in his back yard (in the center of town on the side of a hill under a large tree) i had never heard of anyone cultivating fiddleheads before or since, but he had very good luck with them.
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