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Old 09-27-2008, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Sunrise County ~Maine
1,696 posts, read 1,965,779 times
Reputation: 1092
Red face Wood Stoves Question- Insurance Increase & installation

Well.. we may do this..
it was brought up between DH and myself.

.. and I wanted to see how much
(besides the chopping the stacking the lugging that I am familiar with as a kid)
......... compared to installation, I like to know the do's and don'ts.

Also I'm about 3 miles from the local fire station - how much does that increase home insurance -
- approx of course.

Thanks everyone!
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Old 09-27-2008, 10:25 AM
 
8,748 posts, read 10,927,756 times
Reputation: 3398
If the installation is done by a qualified installer or even done to code by yourself and is inspected by the fire department your insurance shouldn't go up at all.
Ours didn't. We traded the open fireplace for a wood stove this year. Figuring the woodstove is really much safer than an open fireplace I think our insurance people like the idea of the woodstove vs using the fireplace as supplemental heat.
We just need to get used to running an airtight stove. It's a far cry from an open fireplace and takes some getting used to.
We also have a wood fired cook stove in the kitchen we run now and then especially in the fall just to take the edge off the kitchen. We also run it when it is well below zero to help the wood fire in the living room though it may not be all that necessary this winter with the new airtight stove running most of the time. (we hope)
We also installed new windows this year.
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Old 09-27-2008, 10:26 AM
 
Location: some where maine
2,059 posts, read 2,518,180 times
Reputation: 1228
Quote:
Originally Posted by peachie_in_maine View Post
Well.. we may do this..
it was brought up between DH and myself.

.. and I wanted to see how much
(besides the chopping the stacking the lugging that I am familiar with as a kid)
......... compared to installation, I like to know the do's and don'ts.

Also I'm about 3 miles from the local fire station - how much does that increase home insurance -
- approx of course.

Thanks everyone!
my insurance went down becouse our wood stove is outside we have no oil furnace all wood.the reason it went down was there is no sorce of combustion from our heat in the house the only thing comeing in is hot water.
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Old 09-27-2008, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
21,319 posts, read 26,126,562 times
Reputation: 8429
Quote:
Originally Posted by peachie_in_maine View Post
Well.. we may do this.. it was brought up between DH and myself.

.. and I wanted to see how much (besides the chopping the stacking the lugging that I am familiar with as a kid) ......... compared to installation, I like to know the do's and don'ts.

Also I'm about 3 miles from the local fire station - how much does that increase home insurance - - approx of course.

Thanks everyone!
I do not sell insurance, you really need to speak with an insurance salesguy.

IMHO woodstoves are easy to install.

Code is also easy for woodstoves. I also recommend that you go above and beyond code for any woodstove.

For example, I did a 8' by 8' concrete pad 3/4" thick where I sat our woodstove.
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Old 09-27-2008, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Maine
5,636 posts, read 7,247,952 times
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Our insurance didn't go up.
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Old 09-27-2008, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Sunrise County ~Maine
1,696 posts, read 1,965,779 times
Reputation: 1092
Thanks to who have posted so far. I enjoy hearing every one on the topic.

I wasn't sure, because when we bought our house, the insurance company asked us if we had a wood stove. We said no, and they said something about well that's good. I heard that ringing in my ears when DH and I mentioned putting one of the cookstoves in our home for heat. (Since we have two... one that would require wayyyyyy to much work, and one that was used last year and in excellent shape).
So0oo I wondered about it.

Thanks again.
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Old 09-27-2008, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Virginia (soon Ellsworth)
653 posts, read 1,184,377 times
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our insurance went up about 10% here in Viginia, the insurance agent came by and make sure it installed by the qualified person and it done according to manufactory and local code.
it worth it, the instance heat you can not get it from the heat pump unit in the house. the heat pump set to come automatic but if we keep feed the wood stove the unit hardly ever kick on.

Quote:
Originally Posted by peachie_in_maine View Post
Thanks to who have posted so far. I enjoy hearing every one on the topic.

I wasn't sure, because when we bought our house, the insurance company asked us if we had a wood stove. We said no, and they said something about well that's good. I heard that ringing in my ears when DH and I mentioned putting one of the cookstoves in our home for heat. (Since we have two... one that would require wayyyyyy to much work, and one that was used last year and in excellent shape).
So0oo I wondered about it.

Thanks again.
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Old 09-27-2008, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Waldo County
1,220 posts, read 2,477,788 times
Reputation: 1356
As a general statement, insurance companies underwriting homeowners and private dwelling policies in Maine will require that the insured complete a woodstove questionnaire. If the woodstove is installed properly, the chimney is lined and can be certified by someone with some level of expertise...normally the fire department...the insurance is issued at standard rates.

IF the house or dwelling is rented, then wood stoves automatically make the risk unacceptable in the standard market. What this means is that fire insurance is available at considerably higher premium rates due to what is considered the excessive exposure to loss or damage.

As is the case in property insurance, some insurance companies will NOT underwrite fire insurance of any type if there is a wood stove. These guidelines change from time to time, so it is wise to ask the question of a number of different agents, including those insurors who issue coverage over the phone without a local agent at all. Not all local agents represent enough insurance companies to provide comprehensive information and coverages in all situations, and not all local insurance agents know much about much about anything, so making a bunch of phone calls will be time well spent.
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Old 09-27-2008, 08:48 PM
 
8,748 posts, read 10,927,756 times
Reputation: 3398
We installed a woodstove in a duplex we lived in just after we were married. We had metal-bestos chimney installed by a carpenter and we did the rest. We built a hearth out of mortar and Monson slate with a angle iron perimeter. We installed fire board on 2" spacers on the two walls where it was to sit. We paid attention to the minimum clearances and added on to them where possible. I had the installation inspected by the Fire Chief and his only comment was "I wish everyone did such a good job installing them".
I just got done installing a stove on our fireplace hearth last month. Since there was not enough hearth to safely run the stove I had the carpet removed and installed a 1" thick semi-circular piece of fire slate which added two feet of floor coverage to the front of the hearth. It isn't anything you'd call beautiful, though it isn't too bad and gives us the clearances we need for the stove.
The outlet is stainless steel flex pipe through the fireplace damper and into the chimney which is lined.
Safe installation is the only way to go. If you think it's marginal don't use it. Saving a little oil is not worth burning the house down over. Most stoves have clearance minimums in the instruction manual. If you're not sure you can do it, pay someone to do it properly.
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Old 06-17-2010, 08:52 AM
 
2 posts, read 13,308 times
Reputation: 12
Default Insurance

I'm in the process of switching homeowners insurance from Grange Mutual to Travelers due to a big rate increase. In reviewing coverages my agent asked if there are any wood or pellet stoves. When I siad I have a wood burner in my workshop, she said that neither Travelers nor Grange would write coverage for buildings with wood or pellet stoves.
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