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Old 12-12-2009, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,485 posts, read 14,286,680 times
Reputation: 8906

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When heated, baking soda cuts off the oxygen necessary to sustain a fire. It decomposes at 158 degrees Fahrenheit and creates carbon dioxide. This CO2 snuffs the fire. It will work on a grease fire on a cook stove also. Never put water on a grease fire. It will just send burning grease flying in all directions.

How a Fire Extinguisher Works
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Old 12-12-2009, 07:40 PM
 
1,061 posts, read 1,694,660 times
Reputation: 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
That would kind of ruin my living room don't you think?

Water on hot metal generally causes it to crack. Sand won't go where you want it to go when you need it. A fire extinguisher is good for putting out fires in walls not inside stoves.

If this baby were outside then you could do that. Having a mechanical way to simply cut off the air intakes will kill the first easily AND quickly without any mess.
I was speaking of those methods as a last-ditch effort to stop the stove from burning the whole house down if the fire in the stove was out of all normal control, as some posters here have said could happen.
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Old 12-13-2009, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Kronenwetter, Wis
444 posts, read 972,652 times
Reputation: 260
I didn't read every post on this thread but it seems the main theme is survival; heating, driving, plowing, power loss, etc. I got all that covered, soooo, what I did to get ready for winter is went out and bought a vintage 1970 Arctic Cat Panther snowmobile off Craigs List. $350, and it is in excellent condition - appearance and mechanical. A 86 yr old farmer owned it and just drove it around the farm. I already have a '71 Puma but it needs R & R (restoration & repair) which might take awhile.
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Old 12-13-2009, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Elgin, Illinois
216 posts, read 541,892 times
Reputation: 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
And 55-gallon drums made into stoves too.

Exactly what the FIL used in the cabins at his hunting camp.
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Old 12-13-2009, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
Reputation: 17565
Quote:
Originally Posted by OutDoorNut View Post
I was speaking of those methods as a last-ditch effort to stop the stove from burning the whole house down if the fire in the stove was out of all normal control, as some posters here have said could happen.
A woodstove sitting on a cement pad with no combustible material within 36 inches [or 3 feet whichever is further] in any direction; should be able to burn happily in most circumstances without threatening to burn your house down.

If either of our sons were messing with the stove, and circumstance arose where the possibility of burning the house came to be. I think that the most direct method of fixing the problem would be in throwing heavy items at the offending son.

If no flammable material comes within 36 inches [or 3 feet] of the stove, then in theory it should never present any risk to the house.

I laid an eight foot by eight foot cement pad for each of our stoves. Each stove sits directly in the center of it's cement pad.
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Old 12-13-2009, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IRV007 View Post
Exactly what the FIL used in the cabins at his hunting camp.
I was told in 2005 that a 55-gallon drum used as a woodstove would burn through 'in one season'.

I guess I just did not understand that they were using the phrase 'season' in a Maine ethnic manner. I thought that by saying 'in one season' they meant in one winter. Now I have come to learn that the phrase 'in one season' could easily be stretched to mean as long as a decade maybe.

It is 2009, and that same woodstove is still burning.
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Old 12-13-2009, 05:29 PM
 
8,760 posts, read 16,106,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
A woodstove sitting on a cement pad with no combustible material within 36 inches [or 3 feet whichever is further] in any direction; should be able to burn happily in most circumstances without threatening to burn your house down.

If either of our sons were messing with the stove, and circumstance arose where the possibility of burning the house came to be. I think that the most direct method of fixing the problem would be in throwing heavy items at the offending son.

If no flammable material comes within 36 inches [or 3 feet] of the stove, then in theory it should never present any risk to the house.

I laid an eight foot by eight foot cement pad for each of our stoves. Each stove sits directly in the center of it's cement pad.
Most people don't live in an airplane hangar!
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Old 12-13-2009, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
Reputation: 17565
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineah
Most people don't live in an airplane hangar!
True.

I spent a lot of time [collectively years of my life] living in rather confining circumstances.

Now living in a home of my own design; I have a high ceiling [because I like high ceilings], I have a large open room [because I like it this way], and I have lots of windows [again because I like windows].

Now that you mention it, we could fit a few airplanes in here though [would need a larger door].

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Old 12-13-2009, 06:06 PM
RHB
 
1,096 posts, read 1,830,969 times
Reputation: 945
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
True.

I spent a lot of time [collectively years of my life] living in rather confining circumstances.

Now living in a home of my own design; I have a high ceiling [because I like high ceilings], I have a large open room [because I like it this way], and I have lots of windows [again because I like windows].

Now that you mention it, we could fit a few airplanes in here though [would need a larger door].

Gee, and here I thought we had "high ceilings, large open room, and lots of windows" because you spent so much time in a tin can, under the water with low ceilings, small rooms, and no windows....
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Old 12-13-2009, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Corinth, ME
2,712 posts, read 4,914,794 times
Reputation: 1863
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
Now that you mention it, we could fit a few airplanes in here though [would need a larger door].

Existing door is, however, just fine for the kayak!
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