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Old 12-03-2009, 04:46 AM
 
Location: On a Slow-Sinking Granite Rock Up North
3,637 posts, read 5,388,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutDoorNut View Post
I would think a generator would be beneficial not only to his tenants, but to the landlord as well.

For example, if having a generator would keep the furnace going, it would help save the landlord's pipes from freezing.

Why wouldn't the landlord allow it?
True, but it's probably and insurance issue.
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Old 12-03-2009, 09:09 AM
 
8,760 posts, read 16,424,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OutDoorNut View Post
I would think a generator would be beneficial not only to his tenants, but to the landlord as well.

For example, if having a generator would keep the furnace going, it would help save the landlord's pipes from freezing.

Why wouldn't the landlord allow it?
It's very expensive to hook up a back up generator system that kicks in automatically. Somewhere in the neighborhood of $25,000 to as much as $50,000 for the generator, fuel tank, building to house it, wiring, and switches. The one my inlaws put in was almost $40,000.
The system I have is far simpler and cost me only the gen switch, some heavy wire a couple of 50 amp plug ends and the generator itself which was around $1800 and I poured a concrete pad to sit it on. I did the wiring myself so there was no cost involved there.
I still have to bring the generator out from the barn and hook it up when needed. I have a front end loader on the tractor that handles it easily.
A landlord isn't going to want a tennent to do all of that stuff to his property and even if the tennant offers to pay for the electrical set up I'm sure the landlord would be hesitant to allow it to be permnently installed. I wouldn't allow it if I were a landlord! For the same reason most landlords don't allow wood stoves. Tennants don't always know how to operate things and you are inviting liabilities and damage that is unnecessary in a rental situation.
If I were a tennant concerned with winter outages I'd buy a 3500 watt Honda Generator and a half dozen long, heavy duty extension cords. I'd get a quartz heater that draws about 1500 watts and use the rest of my 3500 watts to run the fridge on occasion and a light or two. I'd pick the smallest room I could set up with bedding (keeping it away from the heater) and stay in that room until the outage passed. If it was a long outage I might want an electric frying pan to cook with and melt snow and ice for a water source. In a pinch you can do your business outdoors or melt snow to flush the toilet. If the outage is in summer you can get water at any stream to use for flushing but you need to boil it before you drink it. ( best to go to the store and get a few jugs of spring water for drinking). We survived the '98 ice storm with no power in the winter for 8 or 9 days. We had no generator but had Coleman lanterns, K-1 lanterns, a fireplace, an old well and a bucket on a rope, a gas stove and blocked off the doors of the livingroom with blankets. I made a shower out of a water jug hooked to a sprinkler head and we heated the water on the stove. I drained the pipes and we were fine. In fact the kids were upset when the power finally came back on.
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Old 12-03-2009, 09:25 AM
 
643 posts, read 1,289,812 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by island mermaid View Post
I always went to Lee's only b/c I went to school with the family, they treated me right.
I knew the tires I wanted so I called Lee's in Brunswick (on Gernnett) and their price was very competitive (and they were friendly and helpful on the phone) so I have an appointment to get them installed tomorrow. I'm going with four studded tires, cause I think I want to be able to stop before I slide into the bay down where I am. Thanks for the help Mermaid and Maineah!
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Old 12-03-2009, 09:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunday1 View Post
I knew the tires I wanted so I called Lee's in Brunswick (on Gernnett) and their price was very competitive (and they were friendly and helpful on the phone) so I have an appointment to get them installed tomorrow. I'm going with four studded tires, cause I think I want to be able to stop before I slide into the bay down where I am. Thanks for the help Mermaid and Maineah!
That's what we're here for! Now you can tap dance to spring. If you don't know what I'm talking about roll your window down with your new tires on and roll sort of slowly. That's what my kids call the noise! I think it sounds more like Rice Krispies. Good luck.
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Old 12-03-2009, 09:34 AM
 
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As for the generator, the owner of the house we are leasing is a builder and a great guy. We lucked out in that regard. I believe he took the generator that was here (he lived here) with him to his new house. He said if we loose power for more than a day, he'll get a generator here. I'd prefer it was already here (the next door neighbors are also renters and they have a back-up generator like the one maineah's in-laws have) but live and learn. The power has already gone out 4-5 times since August 1, but the longest duration so far was 5 hours. I expect this to be an issue for us this winter. For people moving into Maine and shopping for house rentals, I urge you to give those with back-up generators a significant advantage over those without (we didn't factor that heavily enough in hindsight. There were several that had generators ~ I just didn't think it was a big deal).
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Old 12-03-2009, 09:43 AM
 
8,760 posts, read 16,424,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunday1 View Post
As for the generator, the owner of the house we are leasing is a builder and a great guy. We lucked out in that regard. I believe he took the generator that was here (he lived here) with him to his new house. He said if we loose power for more than a day, he'll get a generator here. I'd prefer it was already here (the next door neighbors are also renters and they have a back-up generator like the one maineah's in-laws have) but live and learn. The power has already gone out 4-5 times since August 1, but the longest duration so far was 5 hours. I expect this to be an issue for us this winter. For people moving into Maine and shopping for house rentals, I urge you to give those with back-up generators a significant advantage over those without (we didn't factor that heavily enough in hindsight. There were several that had generators ~ I just didn't think it was a big deal).
Good points ! It's nice to know your landlord will help you out in an emergency situation. You could still get a small one to run lights and a radio.
The power company has spent thousands of dollars in this town this summer and fall trimming back trees and overhanging branches from the power poles. Asphlund (spelling?) trucks have been working on the lines since August around Freeport, Yarmouth and other towns. They have really cleared a lot of trees and limbs. They spent four days on our road and it's only a half mile long dead end road. Hopefully it will help with the outages this winter.
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Old 12-03-2009, 09:48 AM
 
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Wow Maineah - didn't realize that work had been going on. Good news. Hopefully it make a difference.
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Old 12-03-2009, 10:37 AM
 
8,760 posts, read 16,424,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunday1 View Post
Wow Maineah - didn't realize that work had been going on. Good news. Hopefully it make a difference.
I think it already has. Last night a number of towns lost power from the wind. We were fine.
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Old 12-03-2009, 02:26 PM
 
1,061 posts, read 1,741,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineah View Post
It's very expensive to hook up a back up generator system that kicks in automatically. Somewhere in the neighborhood of $25,000 to as much as $50,000 for the generator, fuel tank, building to house it, wiring, and switches. The one my inlaws put in was almost $40,000.
The system I have is far simpler and cost me only the gen switch, some heavy wire a couple of 50 amp plug ends and the generator itself which was around $1800 and I poured a concrete pad to sit it on. I did the wiring myself so there was no cost involved there.
I still have to bring the generator out from the barn and hook it up when needed. I have a front end loader on the tractor that handles it easily.
A landlord isn't going to want a tennent to do all of that stuff to his property and even if the tennant offers to pay for the electrical set up I'm sure the landlord would be hesitant to allow it to be permnently installed. I wouldn't allow it if I were a landlord! For the same reason most landlords don't allow wood stoves. Tennants don't always know how to operate things and you are inviting liabilities and damage that is unnecessary in a rental situation.
If I were a tennant concerned with winter outages I'd buy a 3500 watt Honda Generator and a half dozen long, heavy duty extension cords. I'd get a quartz heater that draws about 1500 watts and use the rest of my 3500 watts to run the fridge on occasion and a light or two. I'd pick the smallest room I could set up with bedding (keeping it away from the heater) and stay in that room until the outage passed. If it was a long outage I might want an electric frying pan to cook with and melt snow and ice for a water source. In a pinch you can do your business outdoors or melt snow to flush the toilet. If the outage is in summer you can get water at any stream to use for flushing but you need to boil it before you drink it. ( best to go to the store and get a few jugs of spring water for drinking). We survived the '98 ice storm with no power in the winter for 8 or 9 days. We had no generator but had Coleman lanterns, K-1 lanterns, a fireplace, an old well and a bucket on a rope, a gas stove and blocked off the doors of the livingroom with blankets. I made a shower out of a water jug hooked to a sprinkler head and we heated the water on the stove. I drained the pipes and we were fine. In fact the kids were upset when the power finally came back on.
Gee--I could live for weeks and weeks with no power, so long as I have heat and running water (preferably running hot water).

Would a rented home with town water and town sewage and with gas heat (some Maine locations do have gas), continue to function if the power is otherwise out?
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Old 12-03-2009, 02:39 PM
 
1,061 posts, read 1,741,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineah View Post
It's very expensive to hook up a back up generator system that kicks in automatically. Somewhere in the neighborhood of $25,000 to as much as $50,000 for the generator, fuel tank, building to house it, wiring, and switches. The one my inlaws put in was almost $40,000.
I had no idea such a system was so expensive--sounds crazy to me.

I'll have to ask my brother, who has a generator for his house on Long Island (New York), which he set up himself (long story, but he's both an electric/electronic guru and a cheapskate, and our father and uncles were all in the homebuilding trades).

Although I believe my brother's generator is not set to come on automatically (who needs that anyway, if you're home most of the time) and is only used to run the essentials (not supply complete power to everything), which is all that I would need.

I mean, who cares if you can't run your jacuzzi during an ice storm (what sane person would want a jacuzzi anyway?)?
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