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Old 12-28-2009, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,728 posts, read 47,507,271 times
Reputation: 17577

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steel*Faith View Post
... I wanted to know more about the community in Maine. Is it easy to find other people to go hunting, fishing, off-roading with ATVs ect, boating, camping ect?
In our experience in meeting people socially, nearly everyone owns a cabin that they go to on weekends.

In our township around half of the properties have no full-time residents, folks who live elsewhere own them and only come here to get away.

As my Dw says "we live in our camp".

So yes it is easy to find.



Quote:
... Someone who messaged me, mentioned Rockland as a potential good area for me. Due to the younger community, job opportunities, and the proximity to places for outdoor hobbies. Also, being from RI -- I naturally love the New England coastline, and Rockland seems like a nice fit.
The coastline is expensive.



Quote:
... Other than living in Maine; my dream 'ultimate' dream is to have a small to medium sized house or cottage, land for gardening & raising animals, and access to a pond or lake. I want to have one or two horses, and be able to ride them on my property. To have this in Maine, what does your yearly income have to look like realistically? Do many people live like this?
52% of Maine is Unorganized-Townships, so they are all very low population density. And much of the organized towns are still fairly rural.

Forest, rivers, lakes, wildlife; pretty much is nearly all of Maine.

Maine is a fairly large state. Maine has many regions.

There are higher density areas: like around Portland, Lewiston, Augusta, Bangor; and along the coast. Higher density of people, mean more people live there, and more people 'want' to live there. So home prices are higher. Those towns will offer more municipal services, so the taxes will be higher. Higher home prices, higher tax-bases, and over-all higher cost-of-living.

Compared to other regions, in fact the majority of Maine, is just the opposite.

A 'medium sized house', land for gardening & raising animals, access to water, horses; can all be done in Maine on minimum-wage income.

It is done often on seasonal p/t minimum-wage incomes while raising a family.

But not on the coast, nor in those urban areas I listed before.

I have a pension which is comparable to minimum-wage, and my Dw has been working p/t in a grocery [she was promoted 2 weeks ago to f/t]. We have acreage with river frontage, and gardens and livestock [goats, sheep, hogs, chickens].

However, before anyone else comes in here to start blasting me, yet again. We choose to live a lifestyle, which many here would not wish to live. We have wood heat. So when the fire dies out, our house temps drop a bit. Our town does not have a PD or a FD, or even it's own schools.

Yes it is possible to live in Maine, and to enjoy life as such, on a low income; to spend a lot of time outdoors, hiking, geocaching, sledding, hunting, fishing, gardening, herding livestock, .....

At the same time, you may end up sitting in your living room at night tending a fire, wearing wool pants, a wool shirt and a sweater; in a house that is cool, because you really don't want to spend so much on heat.



Quote:
... What i've always wanted was that 'small town' feel. Where the community is simple, but warm and generous to one another; but also has respect for their neighbors. I am sincerely hoping I can find this in Maine one day.
That is Maine.


 
Old 12-28-2009, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,497 posts, read 14,296,487 times
Reputation: 8934
It would be very expensive to have all you want all at once. Most people in Maine accumulate the things in your dream over many years. The word 'sustainable' is becoming quite popular lately. It will take a substantial income to do what you want to do. This is well beyond the income of a CNA in Maine.

All that said, there are some older rural homes that need some upgrades available at very good prices. Those are within the budget of a CNA and there are trails, streams and lakes near all rural towns. Rockland is expensive. Check out Lincoln.

Welcome to Lincoln, Maine!
 
Old 12-28-2009, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Union, ME
783 posts, read 1,302,203 times
Reputation: 967
Smile Rockland reprieve

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
It would be very expensive to have all you want all at once. Most people in Maine accumulate the things in your dream over many years. The word 'sustainable' is becoming quite popular lately. It will take a substantial income to do what you want to do. This is well beyond the income of a CNA in Maine.

All that said, there are some older rural homes that need some upgrades available at very good prices. Those are within the budget of a CNA and there are trails, streams and lakes near all rural towns. Rockland is expensive. Check out Lincoln.

Welcome to Lincoln, Maine!
It 'twas I who had suggested that Rockland would be a possible beginning point for the OP. In my hopefully humble estimation, there are job opportunities in this general vicinity, especially in the two areas of interest mentioned - landscaping & Health Care. Plus, there are plenty of twenty-something folks around here who seem content with the living. There's enough population base (about 7,400) to allow becoming involved in the community relatively uncomplicated. There are house sharing opportunities for those who are just starting out/passing through. It's possible to drive to Acadia, etc. from here for outdoor interests. And it's not exactly all pavement right around here .

Perhaps in some respects Rockland is expensive when compared with other cities/towns in Maine (if it is that expensive, then I don't know how I've stayed afloat here these sixteen years !).

I'll have to check out Lincoln...
 
Old 12-28-2009, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Maine's garden spot
3,095 posts, read 5,426,489 times
Reputation: 3141
Here's a stupid question.... what does a CNA, just starting out, make per hour here in Maine?
 
Old 12-28-2009, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Sunrise County ~Maine
1,698 posts, read 2,904,170 times
Reputation: 1126
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinB View Post
Here's a stupid question.... what does a CNA, just starting out, make per hour here in Maine?
Good Question.
 
Old 12-28-2009, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Waldo County
1,220 posts, read 3,444,401 times
Reputation: 1393
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinB View Post
Here's a stupid question.... what does a CNA, just starting out, make per hour here in Maine?
It will depend a lot on whether they have health insurance or not. When I was providing care for my parents in their final months, we had around the clock nursing staff from several different sources. One woman who was the permanent day caregiver worked for a professional service. We paid them around $22 per hour, and she made $11, plus health insurance. (Health insurance was very important to her because her husband had chronic health issues).

We paid some other sole proprietors $10.00 per hour, and they were responsible for their own health and workers compensation insurance and their own withholding taxes. The women who we hired were well experienced CNA's, and one woman who was a part time, fill-in person was an LPN who was "moonlighting".

A beginning CNA in a nursing home will probably make $8 per hour, and likely not qualify for health insurance until employed for one year. That's a guess on my part as my information is now two years old.
 
Old 12-28-2009, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
2,776 posts, read 6,967,928 times
Reputation: 2824
I've been researching this field for myself. All the entry level CNA positions advertised seem to be from $8- $10 an hour. the hours seem to be erratic, because of the need. Evening and overnight shifts are in demand. Those are numbers for certified folks, mind you(I'm looking for a trainee position). Perhaps more seasoned people can command more. Not much money for such an involved job.
 
Old 12-28-2009, 06:17 PM
 
Location: On a Slow-Sinking Granite Rock Up North
3,637 posts, read 5,264,507 times
Reputation: 2650
Quote:
Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
I've been researching this field for myself. All the entry level CNA positions advertised seem to be from $8- $10 an hour. the hours seem to be erratic, because of the need. Evening and overnight shifts are in demand. Those are numbers for certified folks, mind you(I'm looking for a trainee position). Perhaps more seasoned people can command more. Not much money for such an involved job.

Overnight shifts may also offer differentials anywhere from $0.75 to $3.25 per hour as well depending on where you work and what hours you'll be working (for example, Friday and Saturday overnight shifts typically pay the most).

In a hospital setting, anyone working overnights full-time has the potential to make $100.00 more a week for the shift (the bummer being that when you go on vacation, you lose that $100.00 differential for that week). Many hospitals start out at $11.00 an hour (depending on experience) and also offer incentive pay if they are having difficulty finding clinical staff to cover shifts. Incentive pay doesn't usually go to anything other than clinical staff 'tho.

IMHO (and no forest - I'm not blasting you - I say "more power to ya!")
I don't think it's realistic to expect to be able to pay for a comfortable home (especially while raising children) on minimum wage. It can be done I suppose, but most people I know who are living on minimum wage are either working more than one job (one woman I work with is doing 3) or have roommates or spouses who work as well. If you are single (forgive me, I forget if you said you are) it would be more realistic to me.

If you were to come up here with a large enough chunk of change to pick up a house with either no mortgage or only a small one, then maybe I could agree with that. Also, you would have to look more toward the unorganized territories because the closer in you get, the more the property taxes rise obviously. Taxes on a home where I am for example (suburb raised ranch 4 bedroom) add approximately $200.00 a month onto the mortgage, so you would have to account for that as well.
 
Old 12-29-2009, 09:15 PM
 
56 posts, read 105,369 times
Reputation: 54
Good news, my wife and I are trying to reconcile and we've been doing better working things out. I'm a 'country boy' at heart, but she's a 'city girl' from Sydney. She's very opposed to moving to a place like Maine, because she thinks she would be bored and cold (that's what a wood stove & coffee is for! LOL). Although she loves country homes, and enjoys doing activities outdoors. For some reason city people have this unnatural/unreasonable fear of living in the countryside. Ex: my Sister visited my families home in the 'woods' of RI, and she was afraid that there were 'murderers' lurking about; which is just hilarious considering she's from LA, and there's multiple murders there every week. I think the best thing we could do would be to visit Maine next time we come back to the US, and stay for a week or so. If she experienced it first hand, I know she'd fall in love right away.

On the topic of healthcare jobs. It bothers me how low some Healthcare workers get paid in the US at the moment. CNA's, or any kind of carer, here in AU get paid $25.00 per hour to start, and everyone has full health coverage by default. That's nearly the same starting rate of pay RN's make in the US (depending on the state). I know RN's at one time used to get paid quite low as well, until they unified and demanded appropriate compensation. I'm just surprised CNA's haven't done the same yet, considering they do all (or most) of the labor RN's used to do.

I'll have to think about what would be the best way to get my RN license. In many ways I think i'd rather get my RN first, then move to Maine and have a solid job lined up. That way if my wife wanted to be a stay at home mom, I could work full-time and get some overtime and support us.

As for my wife, she's a qualified 5 star restaurant Head Chef. I've seen some nice restaurants in some of the major cities, like Portland. Is culinary a bad field to for most of Maine, or are their good opportunities in the major cities, upscale lodges, and Skii resorts ect? I've been to Sunday River a few times, and I could imagine a chef could get a good job in that area, among others.

I took a look at Lincoln, and it seems like a really nice place. Could anyone give me some first hand info & opinions about what it's like to live there?

Last edited by Steel*Faith; 12-29-2009 at 09:26 PM..
 
Old 12-29-2009, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Penobscot Bay, the best place in Maine!
1,891 posts, read 5,148,590 times
Reputation: 2627
I'm thinking it's sounding more and more like you should be looking at Portland, and the areas just outside of Portland- job opportunities for you both, a (relatively) short drive to Boston for more urban weekends, and (with a willingness to commute a fair distance) likely still be able to find a residence in a place that has that small-town feeling you are looking for.
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