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Old 03-29-2010, 03:24 PM
 
11 posts, read 8,754 times
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Default Getting garden ready

Started my seeds indoors over the weekend. Tomato's, peppers, artichokes, and luffa (yes, the bath scrubbers!). I've never planted a garden before so I feel like they won't grow even though it's only been several days. Who else has started their seeds yet and do any of you have any tips? I've got a south facing location picked out when they are ready to go outdoors but now I'm worried because although the area gets plenty of sun now I just realized that there aren't any leaves on the trees and I'm not sure how that's going to work out in a couple of months.
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Old 03-29-2010, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Corinth, ME
2,712 posts, read 3,366,793 times
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I started starting seeds on Feb 8 -- just my leeks and early lettuce. We are eating off that lettuce now (in the house under lights) and the transplants that I put out under the cold frame a couple of weeks ago are still alive, though they got some damage from the extreme cold the other day.

My average frost free date in the Bangor area is May 15. Yours may be different, either way, by several weeks.

At this point I have started my everlasting ornamentals, lettuce to transplant (as well as direct seeding some under the cold frame which is just starting to germinate!) my tomatoes and peppers, cabbages (which got transplanted to 6-packs today to grow until around May 1 when they go into the garden), broccoli and cauliflower and parsley. I have yet to start the rest of the herbs (on the tomorrow list...)

Plants that require "full sun" like many of the vegetables, will need at least 6 hours of direct sunlight; many prefer more. 3-6 hours counts as "partial sunlight" and areas that get less than 3 hours would require shade tolerant plantings.
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Old 03-29-2010, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Corinth, ME
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I would not try to grow artichokes in Maine. They are perennials and do not produce the first year. Artichokes need a long growing season, and mild weather areas. Winter protection requires applying a thick layer of mulch in colder regions and unless you are on the coast in southern Maine, I would not think they would survive... maybe not even there.

Luffa gourds also require a very long growing season, 4 to 5 months of growth to produce sponges. They are easily damaged by frost , and though they may produce gourds of an appropriate size, I do not think it is likely they will ripen sufficiently up here... using season extension methods may help.
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Old 03-29-2010, 04:53 PM
 
11 posts, read 8,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by starwalker View Post
I started starting seeds on Feb 8 -- just my leeks and early lettuce. We are eating off that lettuce now (in the house under lights) and the transplants that I put out under the cold frame a couple of weeks ago are still alive, though they got some damage from the extreme cold the other day.

My average frost free date in the Bangor area is May 15. Yours may be different, either way, by several weeks.

At this point I have started my everlasting ornamentals, lettuce to transplant (as well as direct seeding some under the cold frame which is just starting to germinate!) my tomatoes and peppers, cabbages (which got transplanted to 6-packs today to grow until around May 1 when they go into the garden), broccoli and cauliflower and parsley. I have yet to start the rest of the herbs (on the tomorrow list...)

Plants that require "full sun" like many of the vegetables, will need at least 6 hours of direct sunlight; many prefer more. 3-6 hours counts as "partial sunlight" and areas that get less than 3 hours would require shade tolerant plantings.
I'm in the Bangor area too. I really wanted to start the seeds last weekend but procrastinated. Well I suppose that at least the peppers and tomatoes can go into containers in full sun areas but I'm not sure what I'm going to do about the plethora of seeds that will go directly into the ground: corn, beans, squash, beets, bok choi. Might have to rethink the garden location.

Quote:
Originally Posted by starwalker View Post
I would not try to grow artichokes in Maine. They are perennials and do not produce the first year. Artichokes need a long growing season, and mild weather areas. Winter protection requires applying a thick layer of mulch in colder regions and unless you are on the coast in southern Maine, I would not think they would survive... maybe not even there.

Luffa gourds also require a very long growing season, 4 to 5 months of growth to produce sponges. They are easily damaged by frost , and though they may produce gourds of an appropriate size, I do not think it is likely they will ripen sufficiently up here... using season extension methods may help.
Hmmmm, I was aware of the luffa's long growing season but not the artichokes. I'll still give it a shot and update as the season progresses. Thanks for the tips.
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Old 03-29-2010, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Maine's garden spot
2,381 posts, read 2,748,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gimmem0ar View Post
I'm in the Bangor area too. I really wanted to start the seeds last weekend but procrastinated. Well I suppose that at least the peppers and tomatoes can go into containers in full sun areas but I'm not sure what I'm going to do about the plethora of seeds that will go directly into the ground: corn, beans, squash, beets, bok choi. Might have to rethink the garden location.



Hmmmm, I was aware of the luffa's long growing season but not the artichokes. I'll still give it a shot and update as the season progresses. Thanks for the tips.


It might be tough to move it south to avoid the frosts in April.
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Old 03-29-2010, 05:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by AustinB View Post
It might be tough to move it south to avoid the frosts in April.
I'm not clear what you mean? Isn't a south facing location ideal?
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Old 03-29-2010, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Maine's garden spot
2,381 posts, read 2,748,520 times
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South facing is great. You can still get some pretty good frosts between now and mid May. Starwalker is a pretty good gardener, I'm not. Without protection of the new plants, they may get killed by the frosts.
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Old 03-29-2010, 06:18 PM
 
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Good luck and have fun! We fed a family of four for many years on what we grew in an 80 x 100 foot garden. It's work but the food is great and there is certainly the pride factor involved with it too.
Now that it is just the two of us the grocery bill is not an issue. We may throw in some tomatoes here and there and maybe some herbs but we don't do that much anymore. The plan is to NOT be home much in the summer and gardens need tending! Time for travel,restaurants, wine and relaxing!
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Old 03-29-2010, 06:29 PM
 
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Oh they'll be indoors until mid May. I'm just worried now that the sunny southern location I've chosen may turn out to be not be so sunny after all... :/
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Old 03-29-2010, 06:32 PM
 
8,748 posts, read 10,934,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gimmem0ar View Post
Oh they'll be indoors until mid May. I'm just worried now that the sunny southern location I've chosen may turn out to be not be so sunny after all... :/
Limb the trees or cut down a couple. I had to clear some trees for our garden. Trees are abundant in Maine so don't be afraid to part with a couple.
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