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Old 04-03-2010, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
6,230 posts, read 8,011,223 times
Reputation: 4247

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If you decide you want a 4WD pickup I recommend a Toyota Tacoma. I would have the bed lined and have it undercoated. This is based on the fact you will be driving many miles. Tacomas last forever and get great mileage.
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Old 04-03-2010, 10:06 PM
 
1,061 posts, read 1,102,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
If you decide you want a 4WD pickup I recommend a Toyota Tacoma. I would have the bed lined and have it undercoated. This is based on the fact you will be driving many miles. Tacomas last forever and get great mileage.
Thanks for the advice, NMLM, but I'm leary of Japanese vehicles because of experiences friends have had in the past with them rusting out.

Now to be fair, those experiences were from decades ago, and maybe Japanese vehicles are more rust-proof today--BUT . . .

Just the other day and as if on cue, Toyota announced a recall on its Tunra pickup trucks because of frame rot in areas where roads are salted: Toyota Frame Rust Recall Only A Partial Fix | Tundra Headquarters

That reinforces my skepticism regarding any improvement in rot/rust resistance of Japanese vehicles.

Otherwise mechanically Japan has made some excellent vehicles and applicances.

But my experience is Japanese products have some downsides: often one downside is durability of material--not of design or of construction.

For example, I once had a Japanese washing machine that was a miracle of reliability. But bang it with your knee, and you'd put a dent in it.

But it did a great job and lasted for decades before I bought a new machine (and I wish I had had the old machine repaired instead--dents and all, it was better than the newfangled digitally controlled thing I bought to replace it with).
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:51 PM
Status: "Older and decidedly wiser!" (set 16 hours ago)
 
8,759 posts, read 11,555,188 times
Reputation: 3416
I'd get a Toyota Tundra 4X4. I have one now and would not even consider going back to a Ford or a Chevy. I think Dodge is a joke and GMC is just a Chevy rebranded. I have heard nothing good about Nissans and the Honda thing that looks kind of like a truck is a bit scary if you ask me.
You're planning to hunt, haul snow machines, boats and that sort of thing you'll need a powerful truck with four wheel drive. I can't tell you how many times I have seen someone trying to haul a larger sized boat, snow machines and things like that with one of these little under powered trucks. It tears the heck out of them as they struggle to make it up boat launches or hills hauling a load. They just don't have the mass to handle larger loads safely and efficiently.
Invariably two wheel drives will get stuck. Often when you least expect it. The rear ends are so light they get little traction. I have hauled people up hills a car would go up easily but the light rear end of a truck just couldn't make it. Wet, grassy hills are tough in a two wheel drive. Boat launches are hard on two wheel drives too and if you want to explore the remote ponds in Northern Maine forget it with a two wheel drive anything. As far as snow is concerned anything four wheel drive is going to be better in snowy conditions than a two wheel drive, that's just common sense.
I personally don't like the size of the Rangers and Tacomas. They are just too small to haul a lot of gear, two people is all you're going to get into one of them, and I don't like my passenger sitting on my lap. If you're going to haul the gear and grub you'll need for a week long camping/hunting trip you won't get it into a Tacoma or Ranger sized vehicle. My brother has a Ranger and it doesn't do any better on gas than my full sized eight cylinder Tundra plus it rides like a buckboard in comparison to my truck. We almost never use his truck if we're going anywhere over two hours away as it's just beats you up riding in that little truck. My truck came with a full bed liner, undercoating, and an Off-Road suspension package and I paid less for it than the Ford F-150 I had purchased eight years earlier! Anyone who tells you the little trucks are better than the full sized ones is full of it and too cheap to pay the extra few grand for the real truck.
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Old 04-04-2010, 10:15 PM
 
6 posts, read 7,190 times
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I have an 06 Tundra, 4x4 off road, v-8. Bought it new, got 58k miles on it now, has never had one single issue, not so much as a light bulb out, best vehicle I have ever owned, and that includes several dodge pickups (horrible transmissions).

I spend about 5 weeks a year in the millinocket/baxter area, do a lot of fishin in remote areas where the roads aren't great......the tundra has great clearance, plenty of power, and has never gotten stuck. usually have a 12' aluminum boat in the bed, with gear, etc.........also, it's a great ride on the highway......I highly recommend the Tundra.

Last edited by lotsip; 04-04-2010 at 10:34 PM..
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Old 04-05-2010, 12:53 AM
 
1,061 posts, read 1,102,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maineah View Post
I'd get a Toyota Tundra 4X4. I have one now and would not even consider going back to a Ford or a Chevy. I think Dodge is a joke and GMC is just a Chevy rebranded. I have heard nothing good about Nissans and the Honda thing that looks kind of like a truck is a bit scary if you ask me.
You're planning to hunt, haul snow machines, boats and that sort of thing you'll need a powerful truck with four wheel drive. I can't tell you how many times I have seen someone trying to haul a larger sized boat, snow machines and things like that with one of these little under powered trucks. It tears the heck out of them as they struggle to make it up boat launches or hills hauling a load. They just don't have the mass to handle larger loads safely and efficiently.
Invariably two wheel drives will get stuck. Often when you least expect it. The rear ends are so light they get little traction. I have hauled people up hills a car would go up easily but the light rear end of a truck just couldn't make it. Wet, grassy hills are tough in a two wheel drive. Boat launches are hard on two wheel drives too and if you want to explore the remote ponds in Northern Maine forget it with a two wheel drive anything. As far as snow is concerned anything four wheel drive is going to be better in snowy conditions than a two wheel drive, that's just common sense.
I personally don't like the size of the Rangers and Tacomas. They are just too small to haul a lot of gear, two people is all you're going to get into one of them, and I don't like my passenger sitting on my lap. If you're going to haul the gear and grub you'll need for a week long camping/hunting trip you won't get it into a Tacoma or Ranger sized vehicle. My brother has a Ranger and it doesn't do any better on gas than my full sized eight cylinder Tundra plus it rides like a buckboard in comparison to my truck. We almost never use his truck if we're going anywhere over two hours away as it's just beats you up riding in that little truck. My truck came with a full bed liner, undercoating, and an Off-Road suspension package and I paid less for it than the Ford F-150 I had purchased eight years earlier! Anyone who tells you the little trucks are better than the full sized ones is full of it and too cheap to pay the extra few grand for the real truck.
And I would think you'd be safer in a full size truck if you hit a moose.

Other than purchase price and gas mileage, what did you like better about the Tundra over the F150?

Other than purchase price and gas mileage, what did you like better about the F150?

Also, how has your Tundra held up against rotting?
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Old 04-05-2010, 12:56 AM
 
1,061 posts, read 1,102,124 times
Reputation: 431
Quote:
Originally Posted by lotsip View Post
I have an 06 Tundra, 4x4 off road, v-8. Bought it new, got 58k miles on it now, has never had one single issue, not so much as a light bulb out, best vehicle I have ever owned, and that includes several dodge pickups (horrible transmissions).

I spend about 5 weeks a year in the millinocket/baxter area, do a lot of fishin in remote areas where the roads aren't great......the tundra has great clearance, plenty of power, and has never gotten stuck. usually have a 12' aluminum boat in the bed, with gear, etc.........also, it's a great ride on the highway......I highly recommend the Tundra.
What's your experience with the Tundra and rust and rotting from the stuff Maine puts on winter roads?

Have you heard about this recall?

Toyota announced a recall on its Tundra pickup trucks because of frame rot in areas where roads are salted: Toyota Frame Rust Recall Only A Partial Fix | Tundra Headquarters
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Old 04-05-2010, 06:50 AM
 
6 posts, read 7,190 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by OutDoorNut View Post
What's your experience with the Tundra and rust and rotting from the stuff Maine puts on winter roads?

Have you heard about this recall?

Toyota announced a recall on its Tundra pickup trucks because of frame rot in areas where roads are salted: Toyota Frame Rust Recall Only A Partial Fix | Tundra Headquarters

No rust/rotting problems yet for me, and I live most of the year in Massachusetts, where the road salt is terrible.

I read that recall, which, as I remember, was for 00-03 Tundras. Mine's an 06.
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Old 04-05-2010, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
6,230 posts, read 8,011,223 times
Reputation: 4247
Back in 00-03, Toyota used some recycled steel in their frames. They had terrible problems with intergranular corrosion between the dissimilar metals in the frame. Steel is already an alloy of various metals, but those ingredients are strictly controlled. With recycled steel it's a gamble. Here's an example. I have a very cheap knife made in Asia. I bought it in a convenience store to do something I wouldn't use my good knife for. The cheap no name knife has an excellent blade. It's a gamble though. Most are junk.

I agree with several above who recommend the Toyota Tundra. It is a tight efficient truck. I have a 2005 GMC 1500 crew cab. It gets better mileage than my old Ford had, but nearly all the LED dash lights are out and the only correction for that is to buy a whole new dash for $1,500. The front wheel bearings went. You can't buy front wheel bearings for a 2005 GMC. You buy the entire hub, complete with electronic anti-lock brake sensors. Ouch! Maybe that's why they went to the 100,000 mile warranty; so they could continue to sell these trucks to people who had the same experience as I had.

Back in the 1980s GM had numerous models where the paint peeled right off the hoods and roofs. They tried using recycled steel to be "green". It was a financial disaster. Recycled steel should be used for such things as anchors.

If you don't need a heavy hauler and will make many long trips, go with the Tacoma. You can get it in a crew cab.
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Old 04-05-2010, 10:27 AM
Status: "Older and decidedly wiser!" (set 16 hours ago)
 
8,759 posts, read 11,555,188 times
Reputation: 3416
Quote:
Originally Posted by OutDoorNut View Post
And I would think you'd be safer in a full size truck if you hit a moose.

Other than purchase price and gas mileage, what did you like better about the Tundra over the F150?

Other than purchase price and gas mileage, what did you like better about the F150?

Also, how has your Tundra held up against rotting?
I did not like anything better about the F-150 over this Tundra I have now except the size. The F-150 had a bigger back seat....that's all I liked better.
The F-150 I had was a 1997. I bought it new from Wiscassett Ford in November 1996. I had owned two other F-150's prior to that one so I was a "Ford" man.

From day one there was a problem with the negative grounding in the truck. Lights would flicker, the defroster fan would quit, the radio would stop working , then it would all come back on. Even the headlights would go out which was real convenient. It was weird. If you drove the truck for several hours and stopped it it would not start until it cooled down. It got a vapor lock in the injectors and had to cool down before it would start again. A problem that was never repaired correctly. At 19,000 miles the slave cylinder in the clutch blew up contaminating the plates. Not under warrantee they said. New clutch, $950.00. When I had the clutch put in the torsion bars for the suspension had already rusted in so bad they need to be cut out. Another $300.00. A year later the truck would not pass inspection as the filler pipe for the gas tank had rusted through and would not pass the vapor test. New filler pipe $200.00.
The truck literally ate tires. I never got more than 15,000 miles out of a set the whole 8 years I owned it. It also ate universal joints I replaced them twice a year.
At 35,000 miles the rust was getting bad underneath. All of the factory under coating had fallen off and it was down to bare metal. Again Ford said too bad and that was that. I pulled off the bed myself, sandblasted the frame and applied a spray on rustproofing. At that time I discovered the spare tire holder had rusted off, the brake lines all needed to be replaced and the gas tank now had a hole in it on the top. I replaced the stuff myself at a cost of about $800.00 for parts. I now knew the Ford parts online man personally as I talked to him literally weekly. At 40,000 I had to replace the factory wheels as they had nearly rusted thorugh. The tail gate cables rotted through. I replaced the rear bumper,and over the next few years I replaced the entire exhaust system including the headers, both drive shafts, the pitman arm in the steering, all of the ball joints,the upper and lower control arms in the steering, the linkage to the transfer case,the brake lines a SECOND time. The front brake rotors (twice), the rear drums and brake assemblies,the torsion bars (again),the windshield as it had formed leaks, the radiator, a frame cross member, the rear leaf springs and shackles, the power steering pump and steering box, and two starters. I'm sure there is something I forgot...it was a long list. Finally at only 88,00 miles I noticed the frame was beginning to crack in front of the rear tires, the cab mounts had rotted off and it was just beyond repair at that point.
Why did I keep it so long? I was so far into it I couldn't get rid of it. It was worth far more to me than what anyone would have paid for it. It was paid for and we couldn't afford to replace it so I needed to keep it on the road. Luckily I'm handy,kind of,(don't do clutches) with mechanical things or it would have cost me well over $10,000 in repairs. I got $500.00 for it which was what the fiberglass cap was worth!

What have I done to my 2006 (purchased in '07)Toyota Tundra? It went in for a recall when I first got it for faulty ball joints. It was there an hour and has not been back to a dealer since. I change the oil and fill it with gas. I did change the battery last year. Zero rust problems so far!
That's why I prefer the Toyota over the F-150. Your mileage may vary!!
I should mention that for some reason that year Tundra is sought after. I have been offered $18,000 for it just last fall and I only paid $22,500 for it 3 1/2 years ago!

Last edited by Maineah; 04-05-2010 at 10:36 AM..
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Old 04-05-2010, 10:32 AM
Status: "Older and decidedly wiser!" (set 16 hours ago)
 
8,759 posts, read 11,555,188 times
Reputation: 3416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
Back in 00-03, Toyota used some recycled steel in their frames. They had terrible problems with intergranular corrosion between the dissimilar metals in the frame. Steel is already an alloy of various metals, but those ingredients are strictly controlled. With recycled steel it's a gamble. Here's an example. I have a very cheap knife made in Asia. I bought it in a convenience store to do something I wouldn't use my good knife for. The cheap no name knife has an excellent blade. It's a gamble though. Most are junk.

I agree with several above who recommend the Toyota Tundra. It is a tight efficient truck. I have a 2005 GMC 1500 crew cab. It gets better mileage than my old Ford had, but nearly all the LED dash lights are out and the only correction for that is to buy a whole new dash for $1,500. The front wheel bearings went. You can't buy front wheel bearings for a 2005 GMC. You buy the entire hub, complete with electronic anti-lock brake sensors. Ouch! Maybe that's why they went to the 100,000 mile warranty; so they could continue to sell these trucks to people who had the same experience as I had.

Back in the 1980s GM had numerous models where the paint peeled right off the hoods and roofs. They tried using recycled steel to be "green". It was a financial disaster. Recycled steel should be used for such things as anchors. If you don't need a heavy hauler and will make many long trips, go with the Tacoma. You can get it in a crew cab.
I had an 88 F-150 that did the same thing. If you washed it the paint would come off! The Ford guys took masking tape and pulled paint off with it! Ford DID repaint that truck but it was a crappy job with only one coat of clear over it. They got overspray all over the place and sprayed over the white Ford emblem on the tailgate! Truck was only two years old at the time! I bought a new Chevy after that....owned that truck one month....that's another story.
My brother is going to trade his Ranger for a Tacoma Crew Cab.
I don't know why he won't get the big truck...just likes the little ones I guess!
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