U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 12-03-2010, 12:35 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
15,678 posts, read 18,237,335 times
Reputation: 11192

Advertisements

Yup, I live in Montgomery County and consider myself a Marylander and a Washingtonian.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-08-2010, 01:34 PM
 
7 posts, read 10,680 times
Reputation: 13
Talking Maryland..

Maryland is definitely known for the blue crabs we love so much. It also is known as being one of the border states(along with Virginia) to D.C.. In the area of MD I'm from(Prince George's County), it has its share of diversity, affluent families, ethnicities, traffic/congestion, developments, neighborhoods, and lastly crime.

We get hot summers and fairly cold winters with anywhere from a couple light snowfalls(1-4 inches) to 3 feet of snow in a week(winter 2010, uncommon for the most part, but happens every 5-10 years)...
I don't love Maryland, nor do I hate it.. I used to ask my Mom when I was a kid, "Why/How did our family end up in Maryland?" She didnt really know, but said they had been here for a while, so it was home to me. I grew up about 20 mins outside of Washington, DC, so I had many different cutlural influences, as did many other from the DC Metro area.. I've been told by some that we have little to no real "accent" like true northerners or southerners do... I guess that has a lot to do with us being in the middle of both, and the vast amount of diversity in the area...
So, in a nutshell those of us from Maryland are just who we are, period.. Kinda hard to "pigeon-hole" us...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-16-2010, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
2,051 posts, read 4,847,891 times
Reputation: 1087
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenchild08 View Post
I Most of the immigrants in the Baltimore/Washington Area seem to be very ethno-centric and ghettoize themselves as well. In my opinion, the gene pool in MD is like a frozen microwave TV dinner with all the separate races of people being artificially preserved and not touching each other and mixing whereas other areas are more like a fresh tasty melting pot stew.
You know something... You could have gotten your point across without insulting so many people. What you're trying to say is something that everybody else already knows.

Maryland is a segregated state. Dur. And you accuse us of riding the short bus.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-17-2010, 11:29 AM
 
6,032 posts, read 6,533,645 times
Reputation: 8310
What a STATE is known for or is identified for can be quite different from how the PEOPLE in that state identify or relate to that state or each other. Clearly some states are known for things, while others may not bring anything to mind at all. I don't think about Iowa at all -- but if you make me -- I guess I'd say 'cows,' middle America, hick. OR for Oregon: NW, rain, hippy, progressive. Ohio: nothing really - but again if you make me: rust belt, big cities, industry.

For MD I'd say: nothing comes to mind really -- AND I LIVE HERE! But if you make me: temperate weather, shore towns, crabcakes.

That said......
1) Think identifying yourself as being from a state or a city, has to do with whether the city you're from has its own identity in the first place. People I've met while traveling and asked them 'where are you from" will say Phila.. being from Phila myself, I say "Oh wow, where from." Then they go one to say "Well just outside philly, and they name some suburb or greater philly area city/town. TECHNICALLY they are not from PHILLY. They're from the Philly AREA -- But they said Phila because no one would know WHERE they were talking about if they said Trevose, or Doylsetown, or Ambler, PA.

Now, whether THEY really do identify as being from Philly, because they always go into the city, and they work there they're friends are there and they just happen to sleep in a town that's outside the city limits -- or where they just said philly because it was recognizable -- who knows, could be a little of both.

Same for a person from Fairfax or Hyattsvlle who might just say they're from DC. (OR...maybe not )

I moved to MD almost 15 years ago for a job in DC. And to this day when asked where I'm FROM -- I say well I'm FROM phila, but I live in MD outside of DC. Because 1) I will always identify in my mind and heart as a Philadelphian, so no, I don't feel as if I'm FROM MD., 2) I'm only in MD because a job brought me to this area, my life, my focus my family is in Phila 3) If I said Bowie MD to someone I meet on a trip in AZ or Spain, or wherever, they're not going to know where Bowie is anyway, so I'd have to add near Washington DC. Technically we're closer to Annapolis, but many people may not be able to place that either (despite it being the state cap. and having the Naval Academy)

All these are factors when people self-identify with their state or a place. I have no doubt some people in Ohio if asked where they're from identify as being from Columbus, or Cincinnati -- instead of saying the broader answer of Ohio. Now, if they're overseas they might say Ohio, because to someone in Portugal, what would Columbus, or Akron really mean anyway. If they are here in the states and say, visiting Oregon, they might say Akron, because you'd hope someone in Portland would be able to at least recognize Akron as being in Ohio. Same with folks from Northwestern PA or West Virginia that was discussed earlier. IF you say Morgantown, you'd have to add the WV for people to know where you were talking about, and to someone in France even the WV may not ring a bell. If you're from NW Pa. you might just say the Erie area, or just leave in at PA or NW Pa.

And when it comes to what those areas might be identified for who knows. They may not be identified with much at all, to someone who is NOT from there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-17-2010, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,564 posts, read 7,628,937 times
Reputation: 2785
Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
What a STATE is known for or is identified for can be quite different from how the PEOPLE in that state identify or relate to that state or each other. Clearly some states are known for things, while others may not bring anything to mind at all. I don't think about Iowa at all -- but if you make me -- I guess I'd say 'cows,' middle America, hick. OR for Oregon: NW, rain, hippy, progressive. Ohio: nothing really - but again if you make me: rust belt, big cities, industry.

For MD I'd say: nothing comes to mind really -- AND I LIVE HERE! But if you make me: temperate weather, shore towns, crabcakes.

That said......
1) Think identifying yourself as being from a state or a city, has to do with whether the city you're from has its own identity in the first place. People I've met while traveling and asked them 'where are you from" will say Phila.. being from Phila myself, I say "Oh wow, where from." Then they go one to say "Well just outside philly, and they name some suburb or greater philly area city/town. TECHNICALLY they are not from PHILLY. They're from the Philly AREA -- But they said Phila because no one would know WHERE they were talking about if they said Trevose, or Doylsetown, or Ambler, PA.

Now, whether THEY really do identify as being from Philly, because they always go into the city, and they work there they're friends are there and they just happen to sleep in a town that's outside the city limits -- or where they just said philly because it was recognizable -- who knows, could be a little of both.

Same for a person from Fairfax or Hyattsvlle who might just say they're from DC. (OR...maybe not )

I moved to MD almost 15 years ago for a job in DC. And to this day when asked where I'm FROM -- I say well I'm FROM phila, but I live in MD outside of DC. Because 1) I will always identify in my mind and heart as a Philadelphian, so no, I don't feel as if I'm FROM MD., 2) I'm only in MD because a job brought me to this area, my life, my focus my family is in Phila 3) If I said Bowie MD to someone I meet on a trip in AZ or Spain, or wherever, they're not going to know where Bowie is anyway, so I'd have to add near Washington DC. Technically we're closer to Annapolis, but many people may not be able to place that either (despite it being the state cap. and having the Naval Academy)

All these are factors when people self-identify with their state or a place. I have no doubt some people in Ohio if asked where they're from identify as being from Columbus, or Cincinnati -- instead of saying the broader answer of Ohio. Now, if they're overseas they might say Ohio, because to someone in Portugal, what would Columbus, or Akron really mean anyway. If they are here in the states and say, visiting Oregon, they might say Akron, because you'd hope someone in Portland would be able to at least recognize Akron as being in Ohio. Same with folks from Northwestern PA or West Virginia that was discussed earlier. IF you say Morgantown, you'd have to add the WV for people to know where you were talking about, and to someone in France even the WV may not ring a bell. If you're from NW Pa. you might just say the Erie area, or just leave in at PA or NW Pa.

And when it comes to what those areas might be identified for who knows. They may not be identified with much at all, to someone who is NOT from there.
I love that. I have heard people say, "I am from West Balitmore." Really! I say, which neighborhood. "Reisterstown." I scoff under my breath. That is one of the cool things about Western Maryland. Every little town has even character and identity to qualify as a unique place. Some one from Lonaconing or Midland would NEVER say they were from Cumberland, and someone from Cumberland would never say, "Oh yeah, it is close to Hagerstown", and so forth. I once spent 5 minutes on a phone with a telemarkter who tried to make small talk about having family in Balitmore. "No, we are not close to Baltimore, we are in the mountains, more like Pittsburgh." She didn't get it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-04-2011, 04:23 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,473 posts, read 3,008,706 times
Reputation: 1945
Quote:
Originally Posted by selhars View Post
What a STATE is known for or is identified for can be quite different from how the PEOPLE in that state identify or relate to that state or each other. Clearly some states are known for things, while others may not bring anything to mind at all. I don't think about Iowa at all -- but if you make me -- I guess I'd say 'cows,' middle America, hick. OR for Oregon: NW, rain, hippy, progressive. Ohio: nothing really - but again if you make me: rust belt, big cities, industry.

For MD I'd say: nothing comes to mind really -- AND I LIVE HERE! But if you make me: temperate weather, shore towns, crabcakes.

That said......
1) Think identifying yourself as being from a state or a city, has to do with whether the city you're from has its own identity in the first place. People I've met while traveling and asked them 'where are you from" will say Phila.. being from Phila myself, I say "Oh wow, where from." Then they go one to say "Well just outside philly, and they name some suburb or greater philly area city/town. TECHNICALLY they are not from PHILLY. They're from the Philly AREA -- But they said Phila because no one would know WHERE they were talking about if they said Trevose, or Doylsetown, or Ambler, PA.

Now, whether THEY really do identify as being from Philly, because they always go into the city, and they work there they're friends are there and they just happen to sleep in a town that's outside the city limits -- or where they just said philly because it was recognizable -- who knows, could be a little of both.

Same for a person from Fairfax or Hyattsvlle who might just say they're from DC. (OR...maybe not )

I moved to MD almost 15 years ago for a job in DC. And to this day when asked where I'm FROM -- I say well I'm FROM phila, but I live in MD outside of DC. Because 1) I will always identify in my mind and heart as a Philadelphian, so no, I don't feel as if I'm FROM MD., 2) I'm only in MD because a job brought me to this area, my life, my focus my family is in Phila 3) If I said Bowie MD to someone I meet on a trip in AZ or Spain, or wherever, they're not going to know where Bowie is anyway, so I'd have to add near Washington DC. Technically we're closer to Annapolis, but many people may not be able to place that either (despite it being the state cap. and having the Naval Academy)

All these are factors when people self-identify with their state or a place. I have no doubt some people in Ohio if asked where they're from identify as being from Columbus, or Cincinnati -- instead of saying the broader answer of Ohio. Now, if they're overseas they might say Ohio, because to someone in Portugal, what would Columbus, or Akron really mean anyway. If they are here in the states and say, visiting Oregon, they might say Akron, because you'd hope someone in Portland would be able to at least recognize Akron as being in Ohio. Same with folks from Northwestern PA or West Virginia that was discussed earlier. IF you say Morgantown, you'd have to add the WV for people to know where you were talking about, and to someone in France even the WV may not ring a bell. If you're from NW Pa. you might just say the Erie area, or just leave in at PA or NW Pa.

And when it comes to what those areas might be identified for who knows. They may not be identified with much at all, to someone who is NOT from there.
I understand your point but you just have to understand Maryland as what it is. Maryland is a geographically small state, the 4th smallest in the U.S. actually, but yet is in a primed location of 2 major cities which makes the state population 5-6 million people in a larger CSA area of 8.5 million. Because of this limited space the majority of Maryland's population is on the I-95 corridor from just North of Baltimore all the way down to the DC Beltway and VA border. Therefore MD was not built to have much room for some of these historically industrial towns like Akron, OH , Scranton, PA, Camden, NJ etc. Baltimore was the blue collar industrial part of the state...The DC suburbs are just an imaginary line drawn to seperate the District from the state. They are otherwise almost identical. The only other known city in the state is Annapolis which of course is the capitol and has some of the Chesapeake Bay character. Since Baltimore, Annapolis, and DC are pretty much what anchors the entire area within a 35 mile radius, all the suburbs in between align to one of those towns. So of course Bowie, MD is not going to be as known as an Akron, OH etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2011, 07:11 PM
 
25 posts, read 46,753 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by CelticViking View Post
Typical liberal answer.
Typical uneducated response, CelticViking (with an "S").
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2011, 07:19 PM
 
25 posts, read 46,753 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigbluelandrover View Post
Bad slow drivers that hog the left lane or don't know how to MERGE on the expressway.

Tolerant of diversity in the suburbs near DC and Baltimore. Mostly affluent near Baltimore and DC (Howard and Montgomery Counties).

Baltimore is more blue-collar-you will find white blue collar people near Baltimore, but almost
none near DC because of the cost of living.

There really is no distinct personality here because there are many transplants from other areas and countries.
Hey, I think I might owe you a little apology. I indirectly called you an angry fool in a post about Elkton, MD. It's not your post that is ridiculous- it was the person interpreting it on that post. Sorry man.

I do, however, feel the B-more personality. I was gone for a few years and I am very happy to be back. I missed the bay, the food, the air, the baseball and so many other things. One of the first things I did after I moved back was get a Nati Bo (its even nastier than I remember)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2011, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,564 posts, read 7,628,937 times
Reputation: 2785
Quote:
Originally Posted by vwclassic View Post
Typical uneducated response, CelticViking (with an "S").
??? Please VW, what do you mean by that? Did you read the posts before that one? CelticViking complained about the liberals that run the state, a common complaint from those of us in the forgotten rural areas, then was insulted for not spelling something the right way (it happens to all of us.)

The content of his post was not questioned, he was personally attacked (just like you are doing now) by assuming he MUST be uneducated or stupid if he isn't liberal.

I agree with the Norseman on this one. If you want to debate ideas, let's debate ideas, but resorting to ad hominem attacks show a greater lack of understanding about how to debate and discuss than spelling mistakes do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2011, 08:25 PM
 
829 posts, read 2,507,361 times
Reputation: 357
Exactly... and then we see precisely what we are talking about with the "uneducated" post. Conservatives are either racist or dumb.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top