U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 12-22-2010, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Maryland: Baltimore and Somerset Counties
51 posts, read 61,548 times
Reputation: 34

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
I was just asking a question. I singled out that one because that was probably the only one I hadn't heard before. I've been to Dundalk multiple times and don't think I've ever heard it pronounced like "Donedock". So are you saying the "correct" pronunciation really is how it's spelled but it's just that people from there don't pronounce it like that?
Like I said, anybody who is a native of Dundalk, Essex, or working class areas of Baltimore likely speak with the Baltimorese accent- which pronounces it as DONEDOCK, not the "proper" pronunciation outsiders may use (Dundawlk). The thread is about what non-natives mispronounce- and in this case, since nonnatives don't have a Baltimorese accent, they will not pronounce it in the way the natives perceive to be correct. There are numerous other examples of this here on the board. The literal pronunciation of Mt. Rainier, Bowie, Patapsco, Salisbury, Bel Air, etc. is not the same as the "correct way". The "correct way" in the case of this thread is the way that natives of that area pronounce it, not the literal gramatically correct way. We are talking about the proper way to speak these words as natives do- in native dialect or accent if you will, not by textbook English.

Also, if you have not heard Dundalk pronounced as Donedock IN Dundalk, I am not sure if you were around many natives there.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-23-2010, 04:33 AM
 
18 posts, read 93,949 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
La Vale = Luh Vale
Corriganville = Cor-gan-ville
Eckhart Mines is just Eckhart
Little Orleans = Little Ore-leans
Knapps Valley = KaNaps Valley
Finzel = Fin-zull
Pekin = Pee-kin
Nikep = Ni-kep
Do you know the story of Pekin and Nikep?? I know there right next to eachother and one is the other spelled backwards. U got the scoop??
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2010, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,560 posts, read 7,621,816 times
Reputation: 2770
I have heard many tales. I will list them in order of believability.

1. The town was called Pekin because of the mine, but there was already a Pekin, IL Post Office, so the town was give the "Nikep" PO to avoid confusion. (possible)

2. The name was changed from Pekin to Nikep in WWII because the locals didn't want to appear sympathetic to the Japaneses. (No, I don't think we were that stupid, but I have heard the story)

3. The town is Pekin when you drive through one way, Nikep when you pass through the other way. (Funny, I always see a small smile when the locals tell me this tale.)
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2010, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Stuck on the East Coast, hoping to head West
3,785 posts, read 8,765,275 times
Reputation: 7334
I have a street---in Annapolis, Rowe Blvd is pronounced like it rhymes with ow (as in you hurt yourself) not Rowe with a long O.

Laurel is not pronounced "lor-el";in other words, the first syllable doesn't rhyme with "or" but does rhyme with "are".

As far as Dundalk--I'm a native MD'er--grew up in Laurel (exactly between Baltimore and DC). I've heard it called Dundawk (without the "L") and Dundock.

I'd like to know if "Assawoman" is pronounced liked it's spelled--and what is the history of that name?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2010, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Maryland: Baltimore and Somerset Counties
51 posts, read 61,548 times
Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by bande1102 View Post
I've heard it called Dundawk (without the "L") and Dundock.
The majority do not say "Dundawk". You probably were not speaking to a native and if so, that person was most likely not over the age of 20-25.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 04:33 AM
 
18 posts, read 93,949 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonbailey View Post
The majority do not say "Dundawk". You probably were not speaking to a native and if so, that person was most likely not over the age of 20-25.
I work in Baltimore--in the County on the east side. After reading that post I polled a lot of people I work with who have worked/lived here their entire lives. Dun-dalk (last sylable rhymes with stalk) seems to be the way. IMHO.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 05:00 AM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
3,910 posts, read 7,545,520 times
Reputation: 4109
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandkrab View Post
ElliCOTT (rhyming with Scott) City
Really? The only time I've heard it pronounced "El-le-COT" is when customer reps from out of state read my address back to me or non-marylanders.

I've always heard it as more rhyming with "delicate".
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 05:37 AM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
3,910 posts, read 7,545,520 times
Reputation: 4109
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonbailey View Post
Like I said, anybody who is a native of Dundalk, Essex, or working class areas of Baltimore likely speak with the Baltimorese accent- which pronounces it as DONEDOCK, not the "proper" pronunciation outsiders may use (Dundawlk). The thread is about what non-natives mispronounce- and in this case, since nonnatives don't have a Baltimorese accent, they will not pronounce it in the way the natives perceive to be correct. There are numerous other examples of this here on the board. The literal pronunciation of Mt. Rainier, Bowie, Patapsco, Salisbury, Bel Air, etc. is not the same as the "correct way". The "correct way" in the case of this thread is the way that natives of that area pronounce it, not the literal gramatically correct way. We are talking about the proper way to speak these words as natives do- in native dialect or accent if you will, not by textbook English.

Also, if you have not heard Dundalk pronounced as Donedock IN Dundalk, I am not sure if you were around many natives there.
I'm probably splitting hairs here - But many of the "wrong" pronunciations are not accent based. So I'm not sure the "non-natives" are being naive about it in this case. i.e. Bowie is more like the knife and not singer. Rainer is not the same as the Mountain on the other coast. These are mistakes. In the case of Dundalk, I see it more like the natives pronouncing Boston as Bah-sten - which is more of a variation as opposed to be the absolute correct way.

If I went to Dundalk and started calling it "donedock" - wouldn't it be taken as me mocking the accent?

Of course, I'm neither a native of Dundalk or Boston... so I could be way off.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 06:21 AM
 
5,677 posts, read 7,260,887 times
Reputation: 3182
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonbailey View Post
The majority do not say "Dundawk". You probably were not speaking to a native and if so, that person was most likely not over the age of 20-25.
What if those 20-25 year olds have lived there their entire lives? They're saying the name of their own town wrong? Judging by the post you made earlier saying you've lived here for "nearly three decades," you're not much older than that, so what makes you so much more correct than them?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2010, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Maryland: Baltimore and Somerset Counties
51 posts, read 61,548 times
Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
What if those 20-25 year olds have lived there their entire lives? They're saying the name of their own town wrong? Judging by the post you made earlier saying you've lived here for "nearly three decades," you're not much older than that, so what makes you so much more correct than them?
Whatever, you people are absolute morons. You obviously do not have roots in the places I speak of. Go there, and really speak to locals who've been around 25 years plus - many less than that and you will see (I am 29, 30 next month... I know people a bit younger than me who's accent is diminished so thats why I mention it). I am also talking about white locals- I am not sure how African Americans in Dundalk pronounce their town. As for the person above you- this whole thread is about the correct way to pronounce local places the LOCAL way. So your analogy to Boston is correct in a way. But rest assured, people have been pronouncing these places like this since the start so in my book it is the "right" way.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top