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Old 02-07-2013, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
1,359 posts, read 3,190,946 times
Reputation: 569

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Wow I guess this thread will never die.

Just to reiterate my stance on this issue, I pretty much agree with all of the posts on the previous page, except $mk8795's (just give up dude).

Maryland is first and foremost "Mid-Atlantic" (a cop out term, but it's the only region that the state is indisputably 101% a part of). Historically, as in prior to the Civil War, the state was considered a part of the South, but after MD freed most of it's slaves, refused to secede, and didn't have to go through Reconstruction it became more and more "Northern" and in today aligns itself much more with the North than the South (same goes for DC and Delaware).

That said, the lower part of the isolated Eastern Shore (and lower Delaware counties), has retained a lot of its "Southerness." Central Maryland and the Baltimore-Washington Metro Area (which takes up about half the state) on the other hand has transformed into a typical Northeastern metropolis. Western MD, which only consists of 3 counties, is much more like rural Southern PA/WV panhandle and more Appalachian. Southern MD supposedly has traces of "Southerness," but is quickly being swallowed up by suburbia/transplants.

There's really no line you cross where all of a sudden you cross it and you're instantly surrounded by Confederate flags and Southern accents. In reality (as others have mentioned) there's a gradual transition between North and South. I would say the point at which "Southerness" begins to outweigh "Northerness" (and vise versa) is somewhere around Fredericksburg/PW County in NoVa or around Easton, MD or Dover, DE on the Delmarva (excluding the DE/MD beaches).
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Old 02-08-2013, 03:13 AM
 
Location: South Carolina - staying with brother in Columbia
596 posts, read 759,050 times
Reputation: 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
Wow I guess this thread will never die.

Just to reiterate my stance on this issue, I pretty much agree with all of the posts on the previous page, except $mk8795's (just give up dude).

Maryland is first and foremost "Mid-Atlantic" (a cop out term, but it's the only region that the state is indisputably 101% a part of). Historically, as in prior to the Civil War, the state was considered a part of the South, but after MD freed most of it's slaves, refused to secede, and didn't have to go through Reconstruction it became more and more "Northern" and in today aligns itself much more with the North than the South (same goes for DC and Delaware).

That said, the lower part of the isolated Eastern Shore (and lower Delaware counties), has retained a lot of its "Southerness." Central Maryland and the Baltimore-Washington Metro Area (which takes up about half the state) on the other hand has transformed into a typical Northeastern metropolis. Western MD, which only consists of 3 counties, is much more like rural Southern PA/WV panhandle and more Appalachian. Southern MD supposedly has traces of "Southerness," but is quickly being swallowed up by suburbia/transplants.

There's really no line you cross where all of a sudden you cross it and you're instantly surrounded by Confederate flags and Southern accents. In reality (as others have mentioned) there's a gradual transition between North and South. I would say the point at which "Southerness" begins to outweigh "Northerness" (and vise versa) is somewhere around Fredericksburg/PW County in NoVa or around Easton, MD or Dover, DE on the Delmarva (excluding the DE/MD beaches).
you aren't surrounded by Confederate flags in true Southern states. The most Confederate flags that you will see in SC, for example, is in the far western part of the state which is very rural and isolated and that is just on a few houses even there.

You see a lot of United States flags down South and that is something a lot of more liberal Northerners like to mock as stupid displays of patriotism. The South can't win sometimes.

Maryland doesn't does have a unique culture anymore b/c it's become a transplant area.
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Old 02-08-2013, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
2,051 posts, read 4,849,666 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampFox35 View Post
you aren't surrounded by Confederate flags in true Southern states. The most Confederate flags that you will see in SC, for example, is in the far western part of the state which is very rural and isolated and that is just on a few houses even there.
In my little part of the south here in Greenville, NC and surrounding areas, it has been years since I've seen a Confederate flag. There was one guy that had one in his front yard and he would rotate the particular Confederate flag that he displayed about once a month. He often participated in Civil War reenactments so it stands to reason that he might display that flag. He moved away some time ago and I haven't seen a Confederate flag since. Unless I head back to Maryland that is.
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Old 02-08-2013, 02:20 PM
 
Location: MD suburbs of DC
607 posts, read 1,037,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
Central Maryland and the Baltimore-Washington Metro Area (which takes up about half the state) on the other hand has transformed into a typical Northeastern metropolis. Western MD, which only consists of 3 counties, is much more like rural Southern PA/WV panhandle and more Appalachian.
Central MD may only take up half the size of Maryland, but it contains maybe 80% of the state's population, which is why I'd say most of Maryland identifies more with the NE than the South.

Some would put Frederick County as Western MD, but having lived in that county, I disagree - Frederick city on east are by no means similar to places like Hagerstown and Cumberland. Places like Urbana are simply bedroom communities for MoCo commuters. Emmitsburg is essentially a carbon copy of a South Central PA town, just in a different state.
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Old 02-08-2013, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
1,359 posts, read 3,190,946 times
Reputation: 569
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampFox35 View Post
you aren't surrounded by Confederate flags in true Southern states. The most Confederate flags that you will see in SC, for example, is in the far western part of the state which is very rural and isolated and that is just on a few houses even there.

You see a lot of United States flags down South and that is something a lot of more liberal Northerners like to mock as stupid displays of patriotism. The South can't win sometimes.

Maryland doesn't does have a unique culture anymore b/c it's become a transplant area.
I agree. My comment about the M-D Line was sarcastic. Over the last few years I've visited Westminster, MD (about 15 min from the PA border) and once in a while I'll see a Confederate flag, but surprisingly it's usually one someone's car with a Pennsylvania license plate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by David_J View Post
Central MD may only take up half the size of Maryland, but it contains maybe 80% of the state's population, which is why I'd say most of Maryland identifies more with the NE than the South.

Some would put Frederick County as Western MD, but having lived in that county, I disagree - Frederick city on east are by no means similar to places like Hagerstown and Cumberland. Places like Urbana are simply bedroom communities for MoCo commuters. Emmitsburg is essentially a carbon copy of a South Central PA town, just in a different state.
Yeah, that's exactly my point. The majority of the state and it's populace live in suburbia/urban areas which make the state on a whole more Northeastern.

The 3 counties I defined as Western MD were: Allegany County, Garrett County, and Washington County. I don't consider Frederick County to be part of Western MD, although there are definitely some similarities between Frederick/Carroll counties and Western MD (demographically and politically).
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Old 02-08-2013, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,564 posts, read 7,632,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
I agree. My comment about the M-D Line was sarcastic. Over the last few years I've visited Westminster, MD (about 15 min from the PA border) and once in a while I'll see a Confederate flag, but surprisingly it's usually one someone's car with a Pennsylvania license plate.



Yeah, that's exactly my point. The majority of the state and it's populace live in suburbia/urban areas which make the state on a whole more Northeastern.

The 3 counties I defined as Western MD were: Allegany County, Garrett County, and Washington County. I don't consider Frederick County to be part of Western MD, although there are definitely some similarities between Frederick/Carroll counties and Western MD (demographically and politically).
Washington is better placed with Frederick and Carroll as "Mid-Maryland." Farm rural, not forest rural. Wide valleys not rugged mountains dominate, good agricultural regions, commutable to high paying jobs.

Allegany and Garrett County are much different. There are many similarities in history between Hagerstown and Cumberland, but not in architecture or cityscape. Hagerstown is more like Frederick and the rest of Mid-Maryland in this regard. West of Hagerstown is a border region. I won't quibble if a native of Clear Spring or Hancock says they self-identify with Western Maryland.
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Old 02-08-2013, 06:33 PM
 
Location: South Carolina - staying with brother in Columbia
596 posts, read 759,050 times
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I lived in Frederick for two years, and I didn't see much difference b/t Hagerstown and Frederick. Frederick has a more "yuppie" downtown area than Hagerstown. Hagerstown is a bedroom community for Mo Co commuters as well, if you don't believe that go sit on 270 one afternoon between Frederick and Hagerstown.
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Old 02-15-2013, 01:36 AM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
1,359 posts, read 3,190,946 times
Reputation: 569
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
Washington is better placed with Frederick and Carroll as "Mid-Maryland." Farm rural, not forest rural. Wide valleys not rugged mountains dominate, good agricultural regions, commutable to high paying jobs.

Allegany and Garrett County are much different. There are many similarities in history between Hagerstown and Cumberland, but not in architecture or cityscape. Hagerstown is more like Frederick and the rest of Mid-Maryland in this regard. West of Hagerstown is a border region. I won't quibble if a native of Clear Spring or Hancock says they self-identify with Western Maryland.
"Farm rural, not forest rural"

Yeah, I would say this is the biggest difference between Garrett/Allegany and Frederick/Carroll/Washington (as well (as the bordering areas in PA around Chambersburg/Gettysburg/Hanover). Although there do seem to be larger variances in elevation in Washington Co. than in Frederick/Washington Cos.
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Old 02-15-2013, 02:58 PM
 
Location: MD suburbs of DC
607 posts, read 1,037,769 times
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Frederick County is more suburban than Washington County and is part of the I-270 technology corridor, along with being part of the Baltimore-Washington metro area. FredCo's also more diverse. However I do understand what you're getting at, looking at the lifestyle of Frederick at Hagerstown city propers. In addition, Hagerstown doesn't really have an "appalachian" accent. But to say the two are extremely similar is a stretch.
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Old 02-20-2013, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,626 posts, read 24,839,810 times
Reputation: 11185
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampFox35 View Post
you aren't surrounded by Confederate flags in true Southern states. The most Confederate flags that you will see in SC, for example, is in the far western part of the state which is very rural and isolated and that is just on a few houses even there.

You see a lot of United States flags down South and that is something a lot of more liberal Northerners like to mock as stupid displays of patriotism. The South can't win sometimes.
This is true. I think most people have the following view of the South:

People who walk around with no shoes
Trailer Parks
People who say "Y'aaaawl"
Families that hold hands and pray right before every meal
Church, church and more church
Stupidity and overall slowness
Racist

That's pretty much it in a nutshell. But if you go to the average shopping mall in suburban Charlotte, is it really that different from the crowd you see in Potomac Mills?
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