U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-07-2013, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,639 posts, read 24,864,856 times
Reputation: 11205

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I'm wondering if some people here can give y'alls perspective on the Eastern Shore and how Southern in nature that region specifically is. I've always seen ti as the more Southern part of Maryland even being from Louisiana. Of course its not AS Southern as Louisiana but it has a Southern feel to it.
It's southern. I've spent a lot of time in Lusbee, Prince Frederick, Huntingtown, La Plata and Waldorf and that's all southern. You're not going to find many places advertising Dixie Style BBQ north of the Mason-Dixon line (BJ's is pretty good BBQ, btw).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
There is nothing Southern about Montgomery County that feels like New Jersey and New York. Baltimore I think is a mix. I found areas like Cockeysville, Towson, Lutherville etc to be more northern in mindset and feel compared to areas like Dundalk and Essex and Pasadena. Western Maryland is "country" but the northern kind of country.
Baltimore is more of a mixed bag. It more resembles a northern city than DC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-07-2013, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
8,188 posts, read 21,775,440 times
Reputation: 6116
You know, there is an old thread in the City vs. City forum that asks which is least Southern: Maryland or Delaware. The overwhelming consensus, in particular from those posting from West Virginia on down, stated that neither were Southern.

Based on the majority of answers in this thread, I would agree. The question posed is Is Maryland a Southern State? Not, are parts of Maryland Southern? Southern Maryland and/or the Eastern Shore may be Southern (or they may not be), but these are only regions of the State, and as obvious, are not a representation of the whole State. The State as whole, Maryland, is not Southern no matter how many people say ya'll (I say ya'll and I am from Northern California...) or eat grits.

Maryland has many influences that make the State unique.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2013, 02:06 PM
 
Location: MD suburbs of DC
607 posts, read 1,038,739 times
Reputation: 422
Montgomery County and pockets of surrounding counties (Prince George's, Frederick, and Howard) don't resemble the South in any way. Granted, they don't really resemble the North in many ways, either, but we usually self-identify with the North due to politics, economic ties, and climate (it's cooler here, in DC, and even in NoVA compared to Baltimore and its suburbs).

In my opinion, the fall line is, again, a good indicator of culture. This map is also a fairly decent indicator of the sections of Maryland, though it isn't perfect. The green, purple, and dark blue regions (and arguably the Baltimore region) are culturally at least somewhat Southern with the rest being Mid-Atlantic - at least, that's how I perceive it.

Post wasn't directed to a specific person btw.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2013, 03:33 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
6,594 posts, read 11,652,113 times
Reputation: 4018
I'm not sure if Baltimore City itself is more Northern or Southern. "Hon" sounds like a more southern thing. Yes there is the density but many southern cities like Richmond, Savannah, and New Orleans are very dense in the downtown area. All cities are dominated by suburban sprawl outside the downtown area. I do find people in the eastern suburbs of Baltimore to be more laid back compared to the northern or western suburbs. Howard County also feels quite northern in nature.

I do wish we can become more like the states south of us especially when it comes to taxes, business friendliness, cost of living, the density of development etc. I think oru government is actively trying to make us more like New Jersey and New York and less like Virginia and North Carolina.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2013, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,639 posts, read 24,864,856 times
Reputation: 11205
"Baltimore, Hon!" is exemplified by G&M Restaurant off West Nursery Road, imo.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2013, 05:17 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,174 posts, read 39,311,449 times
Reputation: 40694
Something in the local paper today:

SoMdNews.com: When Southern Maryland was with the South
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2013, 06:20 AM
 
5,689 posts, read 7,286,194 times
Reputation: 3207
Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
Based on the majority of answers in this thread, I would agree. The question posed is Is Maryland a Southern State? Not, are parts of Maryland Southern? Southern Maryland and/or the Eastern Shore may be Southern (or they may not be), but these are only regions of the State, and as obvious, are not a representation of the whole State. The State as whole, Maryland, is not Southern no matter how many people say ya'll (I say ya'll and I am from Northern California...) or eat grits.

Maryland has many influences that make the State unique.
What many people have been trying to say for 109 pages...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-10-2013, 12:43 AM
 
Location: South Carolina - staying with brother in Columbia
596 posts, read 759,578 times
Reputation: 173
I lived in Frederick MD and I didn't see much difference from South Carolina in terms of culture. It's downtown seemed like a smaller version of Greenville SC's downtown. Charleston, Greenville, and Columbia SC all seem more urban than Frederick despite Frederick ostensibly being the 2nd largest city in Maryland.

I think the biggest difference b/t cities in South Carolina and Frederick is what the people consider urban sprawl. I don't think Frederick has any urban sprawl but people there think that the north Frederick area around that Monocacy super-neighborhood with a few retail and restaurants is urban sprawl, along with the Urbana area. In my view the area is vastly underserved in terms of retail and restaurants and it is still very rural town.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-10-2013, 10:51 AM
 
5,689 posts, read 7,286,194 times
Reputation: 3207
I don't think urban sprawl or even the presence of denser urban areas are region-specific...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-10-2013, 12:50 PM
 
Location: MD suburbs of DC
607 posts, read 1,038,739 times
Reputation: 422
Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampFox35 View Post
I lived in Frederick MD and I didn't see much difference from South Carolina in terms of culture. It's downtown seemed like a smaller version of Greenville SC's downtown. Charleston, Greenville, and Columbia SC all seem more urban than Frederick despite Frederick ostensibly being the 2nd largest city in Maryland.

I think the biggest difference b/t cities in South Carolina and Frederick is what the people consider urban sprawl. I don't think Frederick has any urban sprawl but people there think that the north Frederick area around that Monocacy super-neighborhood with a few retail and restaurants is urban sprawl, along with the Urbana area. In my view the area is vastly underserved in terms of retail and restaurants and it is still very rural town.
Urbana is more tied to MoCo than FredCo, having lived there. People who have lived in Urbana since before the Villages and Highlands were created generally dislike the development, as most people who live in the Villages and Highlands are from MoCo (often looking to escape the high COL while still having good education for their children), from other places across the US (many from Philadelphia, for instance), or just direct immigrants.

It's not urban sprawl, but it does have suburban influence. Frederick city natives (not people who go to Frederick to work) also lack a Southern accent. Agriculture is not a big thing until you get out of I-270 - but outside the tech corridor, it is true that the county is rural. Frederick city doesn't have many ties to the South, but the county does.

Many Frederick residents would actually be quite offended that you call it a "rural town." It is part of the DC metro area (although people from more rural places of the county resent that), is less agricultural-based, etc. In addition it's becoming increasingly diverse (particularly the southern half of the city and Urbana).

Frederick city (and Urbana) is very much different from the rest of the county. While the county is an agricultural county with ties to the South, Frederick city (and the I-270 beltway in general) isn't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top