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Old 12-14-2014, 05:21 AM
 
2,893 posts, read 3,413,786 times
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So there! Take that, all y'all scoundrels and cyberruffians!
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Old 10-18-2016, 06:27 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
12,931 posts, read 6,516,830 times
Reputation: 4491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
It's not even the deep south. You can be called a Damn Yankee in Virginia.

The definition?

A Yankee is someone from the North that comes for a visit.

A Damn Yankee stays.

A G*d Damn Yankee brings his family.

I'm the third one.

You can argue with them about the political differences until you're blue in the face. You'll still be a Damn Yankee if you're from MD.
Would Southerners apply this kind of classification to, say, a Maryland native from the Eastern Shore (still a considerably Southern region today), who's genuinely Southern? I would find that hard to believe. At minimum, I'm sure the majority of Southerners are aware of Maryland's Southern roots. At the same time, however, it cannot be denied that most Maryland residents today are not Southerners, but transplants or descendants of transplants, or descendants of immigrants who arrived after the mid-19th century. Superficially, I can understand a Southerner suspecting that any given Marylander is probably a "Yankee" - but that's just superficial. You'd have to know more about a person's background to know for sure.
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Old 10-19-2016, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
2,052 posts, read 4,861,455 times
Reputation: 1125
Quote:
Originally Posted by snj90 View Post
Would Southerners apply this kind of classification to, say, a Maryland native from the Eastern Shore (still a considerably Southern region today), who's genuinely Southern? I would find that hard to believe. At minimum, I'm sure the majority of Southerners are aware of Maryland's Southern roots. At the same time, however, it cannot be denied that most Maryland residents today are not Southerners, but transplants or descendants of transplants, or descendants of immigrants who arrived after the mid-19th century. Superficially, I can understand a Southerner suspecting that any given Marylander is probably a "Yankee" - but that's just superficial. You'd have to know more about a person's background to know for sure.
You'd still be a Yankee. You're just fooling yourself if you think otherwise.
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Old 10-19-2016, 08:50 AM
 
1,509 posts, read 928,941 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snj90 View Post
At the same time, however, it cannot be denied that most Maryland residents today are not Southerners, but transplants or descendants of transplants, or descendants of immigrants who arrived after the mid-19th century.
Very true. Maryland's southern roots were being overwhelmed even when I lived there- and that was decades ago. I remember seeing the old Maryland in Annapolis. I don't know if the city / area later got overwhelmed and went middle atlantic.
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Old 10-31-2016, 05:02 AM
 
5,292 posts, read 5,299,195 times
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Why do want Maryland to stay pro-South, ignorant and backwards?!!!



Quote:
Originally Posted by DAILEYR View Post
I'm with 14th Tennessee living historians & reenactments, consisting amoung us are 3rd Virginia, 2nd Maryland, 1st Tennessee and 13th Arkansas. We are the CMF. (confederate military forces) Its a very interesting subject however some parts of the state have stayed the same while some haven't. Baltimore; during the war between the states were mostly pro-south with 90% of the eastern shore pro-south. The western parts were affiliated with Pa. and W.Va were strongly northern influenced. Alot of the same feelings still exised today. Plus there are plety of confederate monuments on the shore with grave stones that have been replace or cleaned from the SCV. With the Irish immagrants on the east and german in the west. Unfortunatley baltimore has become a cespool of crime and yankee democrates....Maryland is still south of the mason-dixon line last time I checked. Peoples accents are very different from someone in Cumberland,md to Princess Anne, md. In Princess Anne they say Y'all and serve grits,,etc and in Cumberland it more northern.. It's such a unique state as soon as you cross the chesapeake bay bridge it's like entering another state. folks are alittle slower with their words, actions....
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Old 10-31-2016, 05:09 AM
 
5,292 posts, read 5,299,195 times
Reputation: 1100
Quote:
. Every city has it's own unique attributes, but most people who've been to and live in Baltimore will tell you it's almost like a mini-Philadelphia down to the previously mentioned accent. Baltimore shares almost nothing with the South. Washington DC, which is very unique in it's own right but still very Northern, has more in common with the "typical" Southern city than Baltimore. When you look at its heavy industrialization, high population density, rapid growth in the Second World War and Great Migration, large population of European immigrant communities etc., Baltimore is undeniably Northeastern. Maryland hasn't "changed" to be a Northeastern state.


* I approve of this statement!!!!






Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
No more so than Pittsburgh as in your example.



West Virginia is too different from the "typical" Southern state to be considered "definetly [sic] Southern." West Virginia is very conservative, but WV conservatism is a very different brand than that of most Southern states (or any other states in the country for that matter) in that it is almost entirely social conservatism. Elected officials in WV have historically been mostly Democratic (albeit blue-collar) with pro-union stances. The state is also not a right-to-work state unlike every single other state in the South except Kentucky. (MD, DC, and DE being--for arguments sake--Northeastern aren't either)

In addition West Virginia is one of only 2 states (Missouri being the other) which borders, and (in my opinion) is part of, three distinct regions: Midwest, South, and Northeast. It sort of "balances out" Maryland, in that, despite being the closest state in size to MD it is the second-poorest while Maryland is the wealthiest and apart from the 3 true Western MD counties is vastly different demographically and culturally.

As for the rest of your post we are talking about states on a whole, not specific regions. Less than 20% of residents of North Carolina live in the Research Triangle area compared to over 90% of Marylanders living in the Balt-Wash Metro Area. Despite many Southern quirks (such as roads named after Confederate "leaders") I would consider most of Northern Virginia Northeastern, but Virginia as a whole Southern.

Things like the education level of residents definitely do correlate with regional identity. Is it just a coincidence that 8 of the 10 states with the highest percentage of residents with bachelor's degrees (DC, MA, CO, MD, CT, NJ, VA, VT, NY, NH) are located in the NE?

I definitely disagree with you about Baltimore. Every city has it's own unique attributes, but most people who've been to and live in Baltimore will tell you it's almost like a mini-Philadelphia down to the previously mentioned accent. Baltimore shares almost nothing with the South. Washington DC, which is very unique in it's own right but still very Northern, has more in common with the "typical" Southern city than Baltimore. When you look at its heavy industrialization, high population density, rapid growth in the Second World War and Great Migration, large population of European immigrant communities etc., Baltimore is undeniably Northeastern. Maryland hasn't "changed" to be a Northeastern state. It's been that way since at least prior to the Civil War when, like Delaware, most of the blacks living in the state were free and the state didn't secede with the rest of the South.



I agree that Maryland is a border state, and is more Mid-Atlantic than anything else, but if it must be places in either North or South it leans more towards the former. Lol yeah it's been a while.
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