U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-10-2011, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,564 posts, read 7,634,742 times
Reputation: 2790

Advertisements

Lots of accents can be trained away, and some regional dialects are less noticeable or absent in different socio-economic classes.

Case in point - Larry the Cable Guy. Sounds as Southern as the day is long.......but was born in Nebraska, the place in America closest to the actual "standard" that you hear on national news. He picked up his accent as an adult when he moved to Jacksonville, FL. Sometimes I think he is faking it to be his "character." But maybe he really did pick up as an adult.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-10-2011, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Edgemere, Maryland
501 posts, read 956,554 times
Reputation: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
Sometimes I think he is faking it to be his "character."
He is! I love Blue Collar Comedy Tour, but that always bugged me. If you listen to his interviews today he doesn't have it It's weird.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-10-2011, 10:35 PM
DMV
 
Location: Washington, DC
559 posts, read 914,511 times
Reputation: 124
MDguy99
Quote:
you cannot use celebrities as a gauge for the entire population of where they come from.
Yes you can because they were once apart of our population before they became famous and moved away. BTW: Mya still lives in this area and Im really good friends with Martin Lawrence nephew that I went to school with, so I dont know about your side of MD, but on this side we have our own Culture and we're all pretty much in sync with one another culturally.

Quote:
Have my example again: Ellen and Richard Simmons are from New Orleans (literally, born and raised) and they hardly act or sound Southern, so by your logic, they aren't Southern and neither is anyone from New Orleans, right?
No they do not come off as Southerners IMO. Just because someone is from the South doesn't mean that they are Southern. Being from the South and being Southern are actually 2 different things. You could be from the North, but have a Southern Attitude just like you could be from the South and have Northern attitude. BTW: a lot of people from New Orleans sound like they could be from NY IMO.



Quote:
LOL- I have no idea what you are. If I had assumed you were black and you weren't then people would be ****ting on me for that one, too.
LOL true



Quote:
I understand regional dialects. However, I am not back and I guess my ear isn't "tuned" to the black "language". I am asking you how I can tell the difference between a southern twang/ drawl and an ebonics twang/ drawl. Don't just say "cause you can". Please let me know.
Okay well let me give you an example. Ebonics is mostly the same everywhere in the Black Communities except the Northerners say it in a Northern Accent while the Southerners say it in a Southern Accent. Like the word Shorty. People in the North pronounce this word like (Shordy), but Blacks from the South pronounce it like (Shawdy). The Southerner's basically replace the letters "or" with an "aw" as there way of saying it, which is a Southern thing. Southerner's also flip words like the word "Thing" and turn it into the word "Thang", so instead of saying "Look at that (Thing) right there", they would say "Look at that (Thang) right there. They replaced the letters "in" with the letters "an" because they're Southern accents sometimes enables them to say certain words the proper way. Northern accents are one of the closest accents to speaking in standard English. Now if either the Northern or Southern accent is to strong, then either of them can equally be hard to understand, but on an average the Northern accents is whats claimed to be the easiest to understand by most.

Last edited by DMV; 03-10-2011 at 10:53 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2011, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,564 posts, read 7,634,742 times
Reputation: 2790
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMV View Post
MDguy99 Okay well let me give you an example. Ebonics is mostly the same everywhere in the Black Communities except the Northerners say it in a Northern Accent while the Southerners say it in a Southern Accent. Like the word Shorty. People in the North pronounce this word like (Shordy), but Blacks from the South pronounce it like (Shawdy). The Southerner's basically replace the letters "or" with an "aw" as there way of saying it, which is a Southern thing. Southerner's also flip words like the word "Thing" and turn it into the word "Thang", so instead of saying "Look at that (Thing) right there", they would say "Look at that (Thang) right there. They replaced the letters "in" with the letters "an" because they're Southern accents sometimes enables them to say certain words the proper way. Northern accents are one of the closest accents to speaking in standard English. Now if either the Northern or Southern accent is to strong, then either of them can equally be hard to understand, but on an average the Northern accents is whats claimed to be the easiest to understand by most.
I find that to be incredibly insightful. That is a great way to describe the difference.

Do you mean Black Northern dialects are closer to the standard and easier to understand, or all Northern dialects in general?

I had read that pre 1865, the dialects of the American-American population were rather similar to the local white dialects, just with particular "Ebonic" markers. After 1865 when blacks from different rurals areas mixed in urban areas they created new standards. The linguistic name for it is BEV or Black English Vernacular, but Ebonics is used more often since it is a better known term.

DMV, do the rural black populations in the South today still sound similar to the local white dialects (meaning a North Carolina white and and a North Carolina black would still both be noticably from NC), or has the standard spread into the old rural south too?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2011, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Edgemere, Maryland
501 posts, read 956,554 times
Reputation: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMV View Post



Okay well let me give you an example. Ebonics is mostly the same everywhere in the Black Communities except the Northerners say it in a Northern Accent while the Southerners say it in a Southern Accent. Like the word Shorty. People in the North pronounce this word like (Shordy), but Blacks from the South pronounce it like (Shawdy). The Southerner's basically replace the letters "or" with an "aw" as there way of saying it, which is a Southern thing. Southerner's also flip words like the word "Thing" and turn it into the word "Thang", so instead of saying "Look at that (Thing) right there", they would say "Look at that (Thang) right there. They replaced the letters "in" with the letters "an" because they're Southern accents sometimes enables them to say certain words the proper way. Northern accents are one of the closest accents to speaking in standard English. Now if either the Northern or Southern accent is to strong, then either of them can equally be hard to understand, but on an average the Northern accents is whats claimed to be the easiest to understand by most.
Well, at least I can say that this was insightful. I honestly never knew that and will be looking out for it!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2011, 12:36 AM
 
Location: Edgemere, Maryland
501 posts, read 956,554 times
Reputation: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post

DMV, do the rural black populations in the South today still sound similar to the local white dialects (meaning a North Carolina white and and a North Carolina black would still both be noticably from NC), or has the standard spread into the old rural south too?
That's a good question.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2011, 10:11 AM
 
Location: New Haven, CT
200 posts, read 330,338 times
Reputation: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
I find that to be incredibly insightful. That is a great way to describe the difference.

Do you mean Black Northern dialects are closer to the standard and easier to understand, or all Northern dialects in general?

I had read that pre 1865, the dialects of the American-American population were rather similar to the local white dialects, just with particular "Ebonic" markers. After 1865 when blacks from different rurals areas mixed in urban areas they created new standards. The linguistic name for it is BEV or Black English Vernacular, but Ebonics is used more often since it is a better known term.

DMV, do the rural black populations in the South today still sound similar to the local white dialects (meaning a North Carolina white and and a North Carolina black would still both be noticably from NC), or has the standard spread into the old rural south too?
Decide for yourself
NC


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPAsVQ95jK4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hr_BXNCTc64

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEs0HllMxSo

VA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tHd7Qh2PEJQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMO9fvwgA24

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MrFPWE2TnrM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hDn5ARPPeXY
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2011, 10:15 AM
 
Location: New Haven, CT
200 posts, read 330,338 times
Reputation: 93
More
NC

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtdX5sUJPbw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xZKleQBj7c

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmPwxpZGgDc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQmFuLHN9N8

VA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FP_o0xwHyXc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ptd9GGx2eBQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_hhdYGrod6E
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2011, 10:23 AM
 
Location: New Haven, CT
200 posts, read 330,338 times
Reputation: 93
Now DC

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsdvJs1OCjk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yd1Q08b77-Q

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9m8Y1lDxlE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83u57L9rnRw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYOYBfoh9Ec

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AUWwVxAGeUs

These guys sound just as southern if not more than the people from VA and NC in the videos that I posted earlier
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-11-2011, 10:29 AM
 
Location: New Haven, CT
200 posts, read 330,338 times
Reputation: 93
Now this is true NE
NJ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2H1nPwDHn78

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVRKlE7mzus

Philly

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ie-8k0_Tfl0

Connecticut(home sweet home)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-MYT-OwF0U

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9hty1LQMRc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBrlApaEb4g

NY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_COXB9rp6U8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEjkLeBqb-o

Boston

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyyTPFPKXkc

They don't sound like any of those others... Don't see what these would have in common with Maryland/DC
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top