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Old 09-07-2011, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Berlin, MD
202 posts, read 469,267 times
Reputation: 126

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Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
I have lived in Carroll, Balitmore, Frederick, and Allegany Counties. All on the Mason-Dixon line. Other than the road quality and spread out settlement pattern of the PA Mason-Dixon Counties, I don't see much immediate difference when I cross the border. The dialect is the same, the geography is the same, the land use is mostly the same (although PA, in general, has more small hamlets and less sprawl.)

The big dividing line for me is the "Fall Line" that separates the Piedmont from the Coastal Plain in Maryland. Even today, with sprawl overtaking this central part of the state, I notice marked differences once you cross this barrier. The Piedmont is rolling terrain, Midland dilalects, farms and subdivisions, broad leaf forest. The Coastal Plain is flat, sandy, full of pine trees, and the home of the Southern speaking native Marylanders. Long story short, the Piedmont feels more to me like PA, the Coastal Plain seems much more "Southern."
Good point there.
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Old 09-07-2011, 05:37 PM
 
Location: PROUD Son of the South in Maryland
386 posts, read 530,895 times
Reputation: 189
I guess its just me that thinks its different on the other side of the line.
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Old 09-07-2011, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,562 posts, read 7,625,854 times
Reputation: 2775
PA is different than Maryland, but the transition is gradual. The Mason-Dixon Counties were settled primarily by Germans coming down from PA, thus the similiarity. PA does have that goofy overlapping government structure that makes it different from Maryland. Townships, school districts, counties, boroughs, cities, it makes my head spin.

This plus the HORRIBLE roads are noticeable, but if you blindfolded me and starting driving around in Carroll/York or Frederick/Adams, or Washington/Franklin Counties, I would have no clue which state I was in until I saw a sign....or I felt that good ole' PA, cu-clunk, cu-clunk, cu-clunk when we got on a major road.
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Old 09-10-2011, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Berlin, MD
202 posts, read 469,267 times
Reputation: 126
I was just wondering earlier, what did they teach you all in school about Maryland's status as southern or northern? I remember always being taught that Maryland was both when we talked about the civil war and what not. Most of the teachers in Northern Worcester county where I was taught were from PA or the Western portion of the state so there wasn't any born and raised Eastern shore bias
Is/was it even a relivent topic elsewhere in the state (school wise)? I feel like it was here
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Old 09-11-2011, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,562 posts, read 7,625,854 times
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In school in Cumberland, we were taught Maryland is a "border state." It contains elements of the both the North and South, divided loyalty in the Civil War.
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Old 09-11-2011, 06:05 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
15,671 posts, read 18,223,008 times
Reputation: 11177
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
In school in Cumberland, we were taught Maryland is a "border state." It contains elements of the both the North and South, divided loyalty in the Civil War.
You may learn this in school. However, personal observation and experience is a better teacher.

The real question is - what does Maryland today mainly share more similariles with, the north or the south? Or, if someone visits Maryland, then what region will most of the state be more comparable to?

My answer to both questions is the north.

Last edited by BigCityDreamer; 09-11-2011 at 07:22 PM..
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Old 09-11-2011, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,562 posts, read 7,625,854 times
Reputation: 2775
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
You may learn this in school. However, personal observation and experience is a better teacher.

The real question is - what does Maryland today mainly share more similariles with, the north or the south? Or, if someone visits Maryland, then what region will most of the state be more comparable to?

My answer to both questions is the north.
Really? My personal observation tells me the earth is flat, in school they taught me it was round. My personal observation tells me that the stars are permanent, unchanging point of light rotating in a big circle around the earth. School taught me stars are gigantic balls of hydrogen and helium and that it is the earth that is rotating. My personal experience tells me that creeks and streams always run orange and are coated in yellow slime. In school I learned that certain streams are that way because of mine waste.

My school also taught me to very wary of personal observations and experiences as they suffer from subjective bias. You know, the personal lense that we all fit over our eyes to see what we are looking for in the outside world. I think my school was right on all counts listed above, including Maryland's identity. If you spend some time in the rural parts of the state (and no, I don't mean drive out to "Fredneck" and drive gaze at some horse farms) you will see our state's split personality.

Last edited by westsideboy; 09-11-2011 at 09:02 PM..
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Old 09-11-2011, 10:41 PM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
15,671 posts, read 18,223,008 times
Reputation: 11177
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
If you spend some time in the rural parts of the state (and no, I don't mean drive out to "Fredneck" and drive gaze at some horse farms) you will see our state's split personality.
Yeah, Maryland is split - roughly 80% northern, 20% southern. It is not 50/50.

I would describe Maryland as a northern state with southern influences.
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Old 09-12-2011, 06:23 AM
 
5,681 posts, read 7,266,541 times
Reputation: 3193
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
You may learn this in school. However, personal observation and experience is a better teacher.

The real question is - what does Maryland today mainly share more similariles with, the north or the south? Or, if someone visits Maryland, then what region will most of the state be more comparable to?

My answer to both questions is the north.
Depends how you classify "most." As has been pointed out, if that means most of the population, then it's probably the north. If it means most of the land area, then it might be the south. And if Ocean City is one of the places you're referring to people visiting, if you get there from the Bay Bridge it sure seems like you're driving through the South on the way there.

Which is why many people are saying it's neither north nor south.
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Old 09-12-2011, 06:36 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,867 posts, read 57,900,981 times
Reputation: 29296
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Yeah, Maryland is split - roughly 80% northern, 20% southern. It is not 50/50.
I would describe Maryland as a northern state with southern influences.
Not just you. Virtually everyone else as well.

But after 468 posts...
hasn't this horse been kicked enough?
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