U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-16-2011, 03:53 PM
 
2,893 posts, read 3,402,971 times
Reputation: 4071

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
Let me assure you, beyond a shadow of a doubt. Southernors consider Maryland a northern state. Someone likened the Maryland accent as almost like North Carolina's accent. It's not even close.
This has not been my experience at all, having lived in North Carolina more than 40 years (born and grew up in Baltimore). Many Southerners, but surely not all, hold that the Mason-Dixon line is the demarcation, and claim that Marylanders who behave themselves can be Southerners.

But I couldn't agree more about the accent, especially in the case of Baltimorons like me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-17-2011, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,564 posts, read 7,628,937 times
Reputation: 2785
The Smith Island dialect of Maryland the Old Outer Banks "brogue" are similar, and Hans Kurath, the 1930s word geographer placed the lower shore as part of the same lingusitic region as coastal VA, and NC, but that was based on common use of lexical items, most agricultural terms. I am not sure if this still holds true or not.

I do know that the extremely fastly spoken, thick NC piedmont dialect is NOTHING like anything I have ever heard in Maryland. In fact, NC piedmont dialect is one on the hardest for me to personally understand. All the vowels are different than mine, many final consonants are dropped, and it spoken SO fast, my head spins. But that is just me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2011, 01:12 PM
 
Location: PROUD Son of the South in Maryland
386 posts, read 531,129 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
Let me assure you, beyond a shadow of a doubt. Southernors consider Maryland a northern state. Someone likened the Maryland accent as almost like North Carolina's accent. It's not even close. I was born and grew up in the Annapolis area. I can't get the hang of the North Carolina accent and Lord knows, I've tried. It's just against my education and upbringing to slur words the way they do. Any place with "ville" in the name is pronounced as vule. It drives me crazy.
Hmm thats funny cause I travel to henrico NC alot and I notice zero difference in how they talk to how my families talk. I also noticed while down there and over in kentucky that the locals spoke differently to me then they did to others I travel with who have a more northern accent or are from the north. It was cool that the dialect changed and sometimes the accent got stronger as if they didnt have to adjust thinking some wouldnt understand. Kinda like when you watch certain shows on the south on history and and they put subtitles even though the person is speaking perfectly fine english.

But to be honest I dont notice an accent in NC. Just sounds like non transient MD.

As for south and north well most southerners count dixie as south of the mason dixon line. Why some dont consider maryland is probably due to having traveled to central maryland where there is no discernible single culture or accent there.

Oh and I have lived my near 28 years western (not pan handel) and southern maryland and I can say with 110% certainty that my family and other families that have been here more then 1 generation align more with southern culture.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dotty19 View Post
There is no 1 "Maryland" accent. Me, my family, and local friends sound nothing like people I know from Baltimore. Not saying everyone down here thats's local speaks "southern" but a lot do.
Agreed. Head down south and youll start hearing tidewater. Head west and youll start hearing piedmont. Head even more west and youll get appalachian.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish Forbes View Post
This has not been my experience at all, having lived in North Carolina more than 40 years (born and grew up in Baltimore). Many Southerners, but surely not all, hold that the Mason-Dixon line is the demarcation, and claim that Marylanders who behave themselves can be Southerners.

But I couldn't agree more about the accent, especially in the case of Baltimorons like me.
Technically Baltimoresse is a southern dialect. But like I stated above when Im in other southern states I dont get called a yankee or treated like one either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
The Smith Island dialect of Maryland the Old Outer Banks "brogue" are similar, and Hans Kurath, the 1930s word geographer placed the lower shore as part of the same lingusitic region as coastal VA, and NC, but that was based on common use of lexical items, most agricultural terms. I am not sure if this still holds true or not.

I do know that the extremely fastly spoken, thick NC piedmont dialect is NOTHING like anything I have ever heard in Maryland. In fact, NC piedmont dialect is one on the hardest for me to personally understand. All the vowels are different than mine, many final consonants are dropped, and it spoken SO fast, my head spins. But that is just me.
Thats good ol tidewater/coastal southern. Sadly a dying accent/dialect and also one of my favorite! I have ALOT of family that speak like that so when I watched the smith island and tangiers videos it felt natural to listen. Although the tangiers island can be quite thick at times.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2011, 02:16 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,878 posts, read 57,960,239 times
Reputation: 29317
Quote:
Originally Posted by andrew_s View Post
As for south and north well ... I have lived my near 28 years western (not pan handel) and southern maryland and I can say with 110% certainty that my family and other families that have been here more then 1 generation align more with southern culture.
Which (for about the 20th time) is the beginning and end of the discussion.

As to the OTHER 80-90% of Maryland and Marylander's?
They "align more" the opposite way.

This was as true 150 years ago (in 1861) as it is today.

hth
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2011, 02:48 PM
 
Location: PROUD Son of the South in Maryland
386 posts, read 531,129 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Which (for about the 20th time) is the beginning and end of the discussion.

As to the OTHER 80-90% of Maryland and Marylander's?
They "align more" the opposite way.

This was as true 150 years ago (in 1861) as it is today.

hth
That is incorrect. in 1861 maryland was going to secede but no amount of burned bridges by our govenor and troops could keep the north out. They came, they put martial law into affect and imprisoned anyone uttering any southern sympathy without trial to ft mchenry.

The state was neutral like many other southern states during the first talks of secession but when it was made apparent that we were going to secede lincoln couldnt have the federal capital surrounded. Hence martial law. So youre wrong about the 150 year statement.

Fast forward 60 years and maryland is one of the founding states of the southern conference for collegiate sports. Fast forward to 1953 and it was one of the founding states for the ACC (all southern until 2005 when BC joined).

I dont see how much more I have to do to prove our southern right. Sure we have a massive population of transients, but look at Georgia or NC as they too have transient urban areas as well as there are more. Where do those urban areas align with? Sure isnt southern culture...

Point is while most live in central maryland, not all that live in central maryland are of the same mindest. Hell Im 100% southern and I have lived in central maryland for the past 5 years and I garauntee there are many more like me. So if we really wanna break it down to culture wise it wont be 80% other 20% southern. Maybe population wise its 80% central and 20% elsewhere, but definitely not culture wise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2011, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Edgemere, Maryland
501 posts, read 955,915 times
Reputation: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Which (for about the 20th time) is the beginning and end of the discussion.

As to the OTHER 80-90% of Maryland and Marylander's?
They "align more" the opposite way.

This was as true 150 years ago (in 1861) as it is today.

hth
See, this is severely skewed. You are 100% incorrect that "80-90%" of Marylanders aligned with the North in 1861. What a crock if I ever heard one. Have you ever visited Sharpsburg? Have you studied, at all, Maryland's antebellum and Civil War history?

As far as modern times, you are leaving out a very important point here. Who do you consider a "Marylander"? In my mind, a "Marylander" is someone with roots in this state. A "Maryland resident" is anyone who happens to live here. Just my opinion. I would not consider a transplanted individual as an accurate person to include in this survey of regional identity (of course a person who has moved here from the North would not consider themselves a Southerner - and since AT LEAST 50% of this state's population are not MD-born and raised, you will have to take this into consideration). If you were to poll born and bred, rooted, Marylanders, you better believe you would have more than the 10-20% you claim aligning with the South.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-22-2011, 08:08 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
388 posts, read 659,851 times
Reputation: 195
My family has been in this state for several generations and I don't think any of us really consider ourselves Southerners. Sure, the accent has some Southern influence, but it also has a good bit of Northern influence--at least out in Allegany County where I live. Growing up, I never would have even thought of considering this area the South. Living in the rust belt and annually having cold, precipitous winters doesn't really feel Southern. With that being said, I did know that Maryland has always been a border state. I definitely wouldn't dispute the fact that Southern Maryland and the Eastern Shore are Southern and have Southern heritage. And if you look at Civil War history, the people of Baltimore were throwing bricks at Union soldiers as they passed through town on the way to DC and the mayor was arrested. On the other hand, when Confederate soldiers crossed the Potomac into Frederick County, singing Maryland my Maryland and expecting to be welcomed with open arms, the people of the area refused to feed them and treated them like the invading army they were.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-23-2011, 08:01 AM
 
Location: PROUD Son of the South in Maryland
386 posts, read 531,129 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDguy99 View Post
See, this is severely skewed. You are 100% incorrect that "80-90%" of Marylanders aligned with the North in 1861. What a crock if I ever heard one. Have you ever visited Sharpsburg? Have you studied, at all, Maryland's antebellum and Civil War history?

As far as modern times, you are leaving out a very important point here. Who do you consider a "Marylander"? In my mind, a "Marylander" is someone with roots in this state. A "Maryland resident" is anyone who happens to live here. Just my opinion. I would not consider a transplanted individual as an accurate person to include in this survey of regional identity (of course a person who has moved here from the North would not consider themselves a Southerner - and since AT LEAST 50% of this state's population are not MD-born and raised, you will have to take this into consideration). If you were to poll born and bred, rooted, Marylanders, you better believe you would have more than the 10-20% you claim aligning with the South.
I agree. I have talked to and know most of my neighbors (pretty close neighborhood, but not friendly close) and I can say that about 90% of my neighbors were born and raised elsewhere and moved to maryland for work. Hell my wifes families are from all over and the only ones who are born and raised in maryland are my wifes generation. I would be willing to be if you polled the people not aligning with southern culture most would say they moved to maryland but were raised elsewhere.

I also agree with the maryland resident statement. Most of these transient or transplants come and go and thus cannot be used to identify maryland as alot dont stay. Heck we have a few homes in our little neighborhood that cycle families every 1-3 years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by drs72 View Post
My family has been in this state for several generations and I don't think any of us really consider ourselves Southerners. Sure, the accent has some Southern influence, but it also has a good bit of Northern influence--at least out in Allegany County where I live. Growing up, I never would have even thought of considering this area the South. Living in the rust belt and annually having cold, precipitous winters doesn't really feel Southern. With that being said, I did know that Maryland has always been a border state. I definitely wouldn't dispute the fact that Southern Maryland and the Eastern Shore are Southern and have Southern heritage. And if you look at Civil War history, the people of Baltimore were throwing bricks at Union soldiers as they passed through town on the way to DC and the mayor was arrested. On the other hand, when Confederate soldiers crossed the Potomac into Frederick County, singing Maryland my Maryland and expecting to be welcomed with open arms, the people of the area refused to feed them and treated them like the invading army they were.
Thats the beauty of Maryland. In the pan handle yall have a appalachian accent but from northern west virginia to western PA the culture is very similar. As for weather western maryland (not pan handle) to the east we dont get too much snow, rather we get rain and it freezes over night. The climate differences are what make the state pretty cool to live in.

As for the civil war Baltimore was the first strike against the war of northern aggression and the first real blood shed of the war. As for not welcoming confederate soldiers that was probably due to the fact that lincoln didnt offer trials for southern sympathizers. It was straight to jail do not pass go and the state was under martial law. So if there were any southern sympathizers left in the state that were not in jail Im pretty sure they would keep their mouth shut to not see jail.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2011, 01:28 PM
 
Location: New Haven, CT
200 posts, read 330,042 times
Reputation: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Maryland has 24 counties. Of these, I consider only Charles, St. Mary's, Calvert, Dorchester, Wicomico, Somerset and Worcester to be culturally part of the upper south. They make up less than 10% of Maryland's population.

For the most part, Maryland does not align with the southern U.S. in any way that matters to most people. For example, Maryland votes more liberal than New Jersey and Connecticut. How in the world is that southern?

As for transplants, if they change the culture of a state so much that it takes on the characteristics of a different region, then that state becomes part of that region. This is why northern Virginia is no longer part of the cultural south either, even though most of that state is.
Where did this come from? I'm from Connecticut and lived in New York also have family in the south (SC, NC, DC) and been up and down I-95 most of my life and a variety of places. Maryland is nothing like New Jersey or Connecticut. You won't find any type of southern culture in those states that you would find in Maryland. Summers in Maryland are extremely hot and humid. No city in Maryland feels similar to New Jersey, Philly, or Connecticut by any strecth of the imagination. The winters are mild compared to the north also. No puerto rican day parades like in Boston, Hartford, New Haven, New York, or Philladelphia nor bodegas. The accents from the locals are nothing like the ones in the north at all. Beyond these observations, the lifestyle in Maryland couldnt be much more different. People in Maryland are much more accustomed to chain resturants where as in Jersey and Connecticut people flock to the local resturants that are open by someone known in local neighborhoods and so fourth. Baltimore more segregated and DC as well, while in the cities in New Jersey and Connecticut you will totally see a mixture of different races interacting with each other constantly. From a half italtian, half puerto rican married to an african american with children to a house party mixed with blacks, white, puerto ricans, all conversating and having a good time. Even the ghettos of those states are very diverse. Also Maryland is a very rural state and has hugh amount of old southern culture. Not deep south, but I link it with North Carolina,Virginia and Delaware what I consider all uppersouth. Tobacco also used to be the main crop in Maryland, just like Virginia and North Carolina. Heck, the college teams all rival each other in the ACC lol. That line truely does matter and even the goverment places Maryland in the south. And why do people keep saying Northern Virgina is not southern and not part of Virginia? Just because a place is not full of beverly hillbillies and hicks doesn't mean its southern. South Florida is different from North Florida especially Miami but its still the south. Austin is very liberal and Houston has a gay major. Atlanta is heavily gay, votes democratic, and is different from the rest of Georgia.The triangle, triad, Wilmington, and Charlotte are filled with transplants from the north that had dilluted the southerness of what those places used to be but North Carolina still the south. Plus NC and VA were blue states in the 2008 election. You can't just all throw the south in as a whole as some kind of backwood place anymore, because like one poster said; this isn't the 1800s anymore. Things changed. The whole south has changed.

Last edited by hitek; 09-24-2011 at 01:50 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2011, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
4,180 posts, read 12,769,447 times
Reputation: 1603
Quote:
Originally Posted by hitek View Post
Where did this come from? I'm from Connecticut and lived in New York also have family in the south (SC, NC, DC) and been up and down I-95 most of my life and a variety of places. Maryland is nothing like New Jersey or Connecticut. You won't find any type of southern culture in those states that you would find in Maryland. Summers in Maryland are extremely hot and humid. No city in Maryland feels similar to New Jersey, Philly, or Connecticut by any strecth of the imagination. The winters are mild compared to the north also. No puerto rican day parades like in Boston, Hartford, New Haven, New York, or Philladelphia nor bodegas. The accents from the locals are nothing like the ones in the north at all. Beyond these observations, the lifestyle in Maryland couldnt be much more different. People in Maryland are much more accustomed to chain resturants where as in Jersey and Connecticut people flock to the local resturants that are open by someone known in local neighborhoods and so fourth. Baltimore more segregated and DC as well, while in the cities in New Jersey and Connecticut you will totally see a mixture of different races interacting with each other constantly. From a half italtian, half puerto rican married to an african american with children to a house party mixed with blacks, white, puerto ricans, all conversating and having a good time. Even the ghettos of those states are very diverse. Also Maryland is a very rural state and has hugh amount of old southern culture. Not deep south, but I link it with North Carolina,Virginia and Delaware what I consider all uppersouth. Tobacco also used to be the main crop in Maryland, just like Virginia and North Carolina. Heck, the college teams all rival each other in the ACC lol. That line truely does matter and even the goverment places Maryland in the south. And why do people keep saying Northern Virgina is not southern and not part of Virginia? Just because a place is not full of beverly hillbillies and hicks doesn't mean its southern. South Florida is different from North Florida especially Miami but its still the south. Austin is very liberal and Houston has a gay major. Atlanta is heavily gay, votes democratic, and is different from the rest of Georgia.The triangle, triad, Wilmington, and Charlotte are filled with transplants from the north that had dilluted the southerness of what those places used to be but North Carolina still the south. Plus NC and VA were blue states in the 2008 election. You can't just all throw the south in as a whole as some kind of backwood place anymore, because like one poster said; this isn't the 1800s anymore. Things changed. The whole south has changed.
Wrong on so many levels:
I have a place in Vermont, lived in Boston, family from Quebec. Now live in Baltimore. Sadly, much of Maryland is a lot more like Jersey than NC or even Virginia. Southern culture in the north? Have you not experienced Pennsylania's enterior? Baltimore is much more like Philly and Jersey cities, even cities in CT than anywhere in the south with the exception of maybe Richmond. Bodegas all over my neighborhood. Winters in MD may be a bit more milder but really not by much when compared to Jersey, pts. of PA, and Delaware.

I don't even know why I am bothering with this because it is really so insignificant and elementary. Obviously, MD has more southern culture. It's closer to the south.
Yes, the eastern shore of Maryland has a southern feel to it. But, western Maryland is much more similar to the mountain areas of PA, VA, WV, and even pts. of NY that are mountainous. The DC-Balt region is so northeastern, it's pathetic.
Some would also argue about your segregation comments. I know plenty of African-Americans in Boston who see it as a very segregated city.

Where I really lost ya was your comments about chain restaurants not being as popular in the northeast. Yikes. Where did you get that from? They're all over the place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top