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Old 01-07-2012, 07:43 PM
 
3,688 posts, read 3,809,771 times
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I still don't know why you're using a 240-year old line as the basis of your argument.

But since you keep talking about "Dixie": Dixie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
As a definite geographic location within the United States, "Dixie" is usually defined as the 11 Southern states that seceded to form the Confederate States of America. They are (in order of secession): South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Texas, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, and Tennessee.
No Maryland in there
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Old 01-12-2012, 05:09 AM
 
Location: Anacostia, Washington, D.C.
19 posts, read 21,434 times
Reputation: 20
Eastern Shore/Southern MD/Western MD: Southern to the core......
D.C. suburbs: Northern
Baltimore: Black people in Bmore (Northern) White people in Bmore (Southern)
Baltimore suburbs: Southern across the board esp Dundalk
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Old 01-12-2012, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Baltimore Suburbs
2,656 posts, read 2,075,765 times
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Baltimore southern compared to DC? Yea right.
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Old 01-31-2012, 12:39 PM
 
536 posts, read 913,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
There are cemeteries in Pennsylvania that hold both Confederate and Union soldiers' graves. I'm not sure about New York or New Jersey.
I've yet to find a cemetery in Pennsylvania that doesn't feature Confederate war dead without a Union cemetery close behind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NYMTman View Post
From the National Weather Service, the 30-year average hi/low annual temperatures (in F) at BWI are 65.6/45.7. In Raleigh, 71.2/49.3. At Richmond-RIC: 69.3/48.1. At New York-Central Park: 62.6/47.9. At PHL: 64.6/47.0.

Snowfall averages for the given airports are as follows. BWI: 20.4" RDU (Raleigh): 6.0" RIC (Richmond): 10.5" PHL (Philadelphia): 22.8" NYC: 26.7"

The problem with the hardiness zones is they're based on arbitrary cutoffs. And not even arbitrary cutoffs of average temperatures, but of the absolute coldest low temp an area will see in a given year, on average.

Data avialable here. http://nowdata.rcc-acis.org/LWX/pubACIS_results replacing LWX with RAH, AKQ PHI, OKX to see different regions.
Hardiness zones are arbitrary, but average snowfall and temperatures aren't? If you've spent time in Maryland, you know that the weather in the winter here is notoriously unpredictable. The state is right in the middle between the colder weather to the north and the warmer weather to the south. It also has a number of geographic peculiarities, so you'll never know what you're going to get. What someone may get in one part of Central Maryland can be different from what someone else gets in another part of Central Maryland.


Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
I still don't know why you're using a 240-year old line as the basis of your argument.

But since you keep talking about "Dixie": Dixie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



No Maryland in there
So using the Mason-Dixon line is considered null, but bringing up a Wikipedia article that describes "Dixie" as being the Confederate States of America isn't?

But if you want to use that article, you should have included "In this particular contemporary realm, there are no hard and fast lines. Roughly, however, it might be an area which begins in the Eastern Shore of Maryland (and the southern parts of West Virginia), then extends south into Central Florida."

And even though Maryland didn't officially secede, many soldiers and officers ended up serving for the Confederacy. You can still receive CSV stickers from Maryland MVA's, and a Maryland "hall" is featured along with other former Confederate states in the Confederate Museum in Richmond.

"Although the Museum was a local institution, its founders conceived of it as belonging to the whole South. The Museum was separated into rooms dedicated to the collections amassed by each of the eleven undisputed Confederate states, and by Missouri and Kentucky (which were represented in both the U.S. and Confederate Congresses) and Maryland (which remained in the Union but provided thousands of soldiers to the Confederacy). "

The Museum of the Confederacy: History of the MOC (http://www.moc.org/site/PageServer?pagename=abt_ov_history - broken link)
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Old 02-01-2012, 02:24 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
542 posts, read 379,598 times
Reputation: 316
Ah, the age old question. It seems Maryland has a bit of an identity crisis going on. Growing up in southern Maryland, I always considered Maryland to be in the south. In fact, Virginia always seemed more "northern" culturally than Maryland to me before I went to southwest Virginia.
Now my roommate is from Montgomery county, which I consider to be practically DC, and that area is nothing like my part of Maryland. The DC suburbs seem culturally opposite to the rest of Maryland, so i've jokingly suggested tacking Montgomery and much of PG onto DC with Northern Virginia, to solve this whole identity crisis and DC's "boo hoo we're not a state" thing.

I would say overall though, Maryland is either lightly southern or just has it's own culture altogether. Probably the latter.
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Old 02-03-2012, 06:43 AM
 
3,688 posts, read 3,809,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeyserSoze View Post
So using the Mason-Dixon line is considered null, but bringing up a Wikipedia article that describes "Dixie" as being the Confederate States of America isn't?

But if you want to use that article, you should have included "In this particular contemporary realm, there are no hard and fast lines. Roughly, however, it might be an area which begins in the Eastern Shore of Maryland (and the southern parts of West Virginia), then extends south into Central Florida."

And even though Maryland didn't officially secede, many soldiers and officers ended up serving for the Confederacy. You can still receive CSV stickers from Maryland MVA's, and a Maryland "hall" is featured along with other former Confederate states in the Confederate Museum in Richmond.

"Although the Museum was a local institution, its founders conceived of it as belonging to the whole South. The Museum was separated into rooms dedicated to the collections amassed by each of the eleven undisputed Confederate states, and by Missouri and Kentucky (which were represented in both the U.S. and Confederate Congresses) and Maryland (which remained in the Union but provided thousands of soldiers to the Confederacy). "

The Museum of the Confederacy: History of the MOC (http://www.moc.org/site/PageServer?pagename=abt_ov_history - broken link)
I only brought up that article because andrew kept claiming all of MD was "Dixie." I don't disagree that part of MD definitely has a southern culture, but it's tough to consider all of MD as a southern state.
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Old 02-03-2012, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Metropolitan Washington, D.C.
48 posts, read 59,819 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Baltimore southern compared to DC? Yea right.
In many ways it is, starting with the Baltimore accent and dialect. Also DC is more fast paced than Baltimore is by a long shot. When I rode the subway from Shot Tower to Mondawmin people moved relatively slow and stood on both the left and right side of the escalator. If that were to happen in DC you would get knocked down or cursed out. People in Baltimore are not in a hurry which is a southern trait.
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Old 02-05-2012, 12:38 PM
 
2,333 posts, read 2,460,550 times
Reputation: 336
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoPhils View Post
I still don't know why you're using a 240-year old line as the basis of your argument.

But since you keep talking about "Dixie": Dixie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



No Maryland in there
To you non-Maryland Southern folx you people continue to fault Maryland for not aiding your CONfederate Great--Great--Grandadies in the Civil War....

Your opinion means nothing because Maryland is a Southern state in which you Maryland Hating Southerners can not ever change.......
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Old 02-05-2012, 01:26 PM
 
3,688 posts, read 3,809,771 times
Reputation: 1617
I'm not sure if you're trying to say I'm a non-Maryland southern folk...but I'm not
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Old 02-06-2012, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
1,847 posts, read 3,008,533 times
Reputation: 837
The financial world thinks Maryland is in the south east. I've see Maryland put in the south east time and again. Here's a map, it's from CitiCorp.



Maps Of The Biggest Retail Chains In America
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