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Old 02-13-2012, 08:52 AM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 739,819 times
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Here's some more stuff to think about:

Maryland has a plantation-based structure. There aren't very many true towns, mostly spread out farmland and plantations, and people identify primarily by county. This was typical of southern colonies. Maryland identifies by county more than any other state, which is a very colonial southern idea. This was because the lack of towns in the colony made people organize themselves in new ways. Whether the rest of the south keeps this tradition I don't know.

Maryland's climate has more in common with Virginia and North Carolina. Maryland climate is very unlike the areas north of the bay.

While Maryland is almost always democratic, it was democratic even when the Democrats were the party most favored in the south. Also, most counties in Maryland are very conservative and republican. The only counties that are majority democrat are Montgomery and Howard (PG and Baltimore tend to flip). These just happen to be the most populous counties, so the more conservative southern, eastern shore, western parts of Maryland, and Annapolis are basically outruled by the suburban population.

Interestingly I have heard several times that Marylanders' accents sound like a cross between British and Southern.

Going with the political thing, outside of suburbia Maryland seems religious. Not going to church is thought of as strange. Although that could be considered "southern", Pennsylvania seems just the same, with everyone going to church.

Many people i've met think that Marylanders are very "posh". Take that as you wish, i'm not sure how that would categorize Maryland.

The maritime culture of MD has similarities to that of the Massachusetts Bay. This could be due to the lack of a bay with a strong maritime culture down south. However there are very notable differences.

I'm not sure about the cuisine everywhere, but where i'm from food consisted primarily of Fish, more fish, spices, squash, corn, green beans, barbecue pork, and biscuits or grits for breakfast.

Personally I don't think i'm a northerner or a southerner, yankee or rebel or whatever. I really can't identify with either. I'm just a Marylander.
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Old 02-13-2012, 10:39 PM
 
2,331 posts, read 3,689,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atl85 View Post
Can somebody tell me what delineates Maryland from other Northeastern states? I will bend and go as far as to say that Maryland's Eastern Shore has the a southern vibe, but beside that I just don't see/hear/feel it.

I still assert that the South doesn't start until one goes well into Virginia.
You southern(Carolina/Georgia) Folx can Hate on Maryland all ya want but that ain't ever going to change the Fact that Maryland is a Southern State.....
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Old 02-13-2012, 10:42 PM
 
2,331 posts, read 3,689,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
The south starts at Fredericksburg, VA.
Elkton,MD is where the South starts and will go as far as ranking Wilmington, Del. as the starting point of the South....

Most of Delaware resembles Virginia.........
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Old 02-13-2012, 11:00 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,245 posts, read 5,534,685 times
Reputation: 3256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
Here's some more stuff to think about:

Maryland has a plantation-based structure. There aren't very many true towns, mostly spread out farmland and plantations, and people identify primarily by county. This was typical of southern colonies. Maryland identifies by county more than any other state, which is a very colonial southern idea. This was because the lack of towns in the colony made people organize themselves in new ways. Whether the rest of the south keeps this tradition I don't know.

Maryland's climate has more in common with Virginia and North Carolina. Maryland climate is very unlike the areas north of the bay.

While Maryland is almost always democratic, it was democratic even when the Democrats were the party most favored in the south. Also, most counties in Maryland are very conservative and republican. The only counties that are majority democrat are Montgomery and Howard (PG and Baltimore tend to flip). These just happen to be the most populous counties, so the more conservative southern, eastern shore, western parts of Maryland, and Annapolis are basically outruled by the suburban population.

Interestingly I have heard several times that Marylanders' accents sound like a cross between British and Southern.

Going with the political thing, outside of suburbia Maryland seems religious. Not going to church is thought of as strange. Although that could be considered "southern", Pennsylvania seems just the same, with everyone going to church.

Many people i've met think that Marylanders are very "posh". Take that as you wish, i'm not sure how that would categorize Maryland.

The maritime culture of MD has similarities to that of the Massachusetts Bay. This could be due to the lack of a bay with a strong maritime culture down south. However there are very notable differences.

I'm not sure about the cuisine everywhere, but where i'm from food consisted primarily of Fish, more fish, spices, squash, corn, green beans, barbecue pork, and biscuits or grits for breakfast.

Personally I don't think i'm a northerner or a southerner, yankee or rebel or whatever. I really can't identify with either. I'm just a Marylander.
- Plantation Based structure? There arent many true town?? Are you talking about rural areas?? If so, what states do NOT have rural areas? Maryland has one of the highest population densities in the country, so we obviously have less than most.

- The weather in Maryland is similar to MD southern PA, DE, southern NJ, NOVA. It gets to cold in the winter to be like NC and most of VA. Our average snowfall is alot more than VA and NC. Baltimore averages slightly more snow than Philly. The bay only moderates the temperature of the places immediatly around it. Also, night time lows in the Baltimore area the same or slightly lower than NYC.

- Most urdan area vote democratic, and most rural areas vote republican.

-Accents? Have you ever heard Joe Flacco's accent?? He has a Baltimore accent and he's was raised right outside of philly.
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Old 02-14-2012, 12:26 AM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 739,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
- Plantation Based structure? There arent many true town?? Are you talking about rural areas?? If so, what states do NOT have rural areas? Maryland has one of the highest population densities in the country, so we obviously have less than most.

- The weather in Maryland is similar to MD southern PA, DE, southern NJ, NOVA. It gets to cold in the winter to be like NC and most of VA. Our average snowfall is alot more than VA and NC. Baltimore averages slightly more snow than Philly. The bay only moderates the temperature of the places immediatly around it. Also, night time lows in the Baltimore area the same or slightly lower than NYC.

- Most urdan area vote democratic, and most rural areas vote republican.

-Accents? Have you ever heard Joe Flacco's accent?? He has a Baltimore accent and he's was raised right outside of philly.
-Yes, plantation based structure, no not talking about general rural areas. Maryland is generally county-based over town based. I've lived in PA and NY and both had town-based rural areas. The county-based system derives from the lack of towns and abundance of plantations, something characteristic of Virginia and Maryland but not northward. I've heard countless times "Why do Marylanders always identify by county?" The explanation i've heard both from MD'ers and others is that MD towns and rural areas are not as centralized as other places.
This is not to say that towns do not exist, they definitely do in abundance. BUT Maryland was founded by a plantation system rather than a town system like the northern colonies, and you'll still find the results of that settlement pattern today, primarily in the earlier parts of MD like Saint Mary's, Calvert, Charles and Anne Arundel, since those are where said plantations and their organizing systems were developed.

-We have a high population density because there are two important cities packed together in a rather small state. Not because we lack rural areas or are made up of towns instead of spreading population. PA has a lower population density but here nearly everyone lives in towns, and the towns are bigger, not just a couple houses and a store. This is due to the mountains limiting the spread of people I think.

-I live in southern PA now. The weather is entirely different and far more temperate here. VA and NC seem a lot more similar to me. In VA, even far inland, I felt okay year round with the weather. In PA I feel weather-shocked due to the differences. It is so temperate here that it bores me. Miss the extremes honestly.

-True, but you could also argue that the urban/suburban areas of MD are mostly populated by "transplants". I honestly have trouble finding a native Marylander if I go to Montgomery county, for example.

-I just went off what I heard from people out of state. I don't think I sound british at all. And so what if he's raised outside of Philly? What are you trying to prove by that? I don't hear a distinctive accent at all, honestly. He sounds like folks here in PA. Folks back home sounded much different but then i'm not from Baltimore.

But really this whole southern/northern thing is ridiculous. Maryland is neither. The DC area is... I have no idea honestly, multicultural but weird. Baltimore doesn't remind me even slightly of Philly or somewhere like that, but it doesn't seem like anywhere to the south either. The coastal and bay areas are kind of their own thing or like eastern VA though not as built up. Western MD is like PA more than anything else as far as I can tell.

I also don't consider PA northern, it's appalachian culture, not northern culture, and the two cities are fairly typical.

Similarly, I don't consider VA truly southern, it's seems either appalachian, Chesapeake, DC suburbia, or just country depending on the place. You could call the country people there southern but to me they just seem like ordinary rural people.

Honestly I feel both at home in PA and VA, but more comfortable in southern VA with the culture and people who I feel I fit in with better, so maybe you could say that means i'm southern, but I hold that Maryland is neither north nor south, its a combo of Chesapeake bay / coastal culture which it shares with DL and eastern VA and appalachian culture which it shares with PA, WV, and to a lesser extent western VA. Then there is the urban central area which I can't really place, but we can call that northern simply because of the NE corridor.

Last edited by Tezcatlipoca; 02-14-2012 at 12:41 AM..
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Old 02-14-2012, 12:05 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 739,819 times
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If you want religiousness to be a factor, Maryland has similar church attendance rates to Va, Pa, and De. the great lakes. It has less attendance than the south, more attendance than the north. So it seems Maryland is part of the border in this as well.
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Old 02-14-2012, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,559 posts, read 7,619,598 times
Reputation: 2770
County-level identification among Marylanders is a fact. When two Marylanders meet, that is almost always the next question asked. Not "What town are you from," but "what county?" Based on the answer, the conversation either stops quickly, or folks become fast friends.

Also Maryland only has very few incorporated areas for a state with 6 million people.

Maryland Towns & Cities - Municipalities (by name)

Yup, that is all of them. Every other place is just a "geographic expression" as they say.
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Old 02-14-2012, 04:29 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,107 posts, read 39,170,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
County-level identification among Marylanders is a fact. When two Marylanders meet, that is almost always the next question asked. Not "What town are you from," but "what county?" Based on the answer, the conversation either stops quickly, or folks become fast friends.

Also Maryland only has very few incorporated areas for a state with 6 million people.

Maryland Towns & Cities - Municipalities (by name)

Yup, that is all of them. Every other place is just a "geographic expression" as they say.
How do you like my Town Hall?
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Old 02-14-2012, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
4,559 posts, read 7,619,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
How do you like my Town Hall?
Honestly, the double story pillared porches make it look very "Southern" to me! Very pretty.
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Old 02-14-2012, 06:46 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 739,819 times
Reputation: 347
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
County-level identification among Marylanders is a fact. When two Marylanders meet, that is almost always the next question asked. Not "What town are you from," but "what county?" Based on the answer, the conversation either stops quickly, or folks become fast friends.

Also Maryland only has very few incorporated areas for a state with 6 million people.

Maryland Towns & Cities - Municipalities (by name)

Yup, that is all of them. Every other place is just a "geographic expression" as they say.
This is what I was trying to point out. County identification is strongest is Maryland, and I was trying to say that this was because the state developed as plantations rather than towns. Counties were originally formed here to organize the militia because the only town to begin with was the old capitol of St. Mary's. I'm not saying we live on plantations now, just that the present county identification results from this.

It is always funny though. Everywhere else I go people ask where i'm from in MD and I answer by county. They're always confused and then ask what's the issue with all us Marylanders.
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