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Old 04-21-2012, 03:21 AM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
2,051 posts, read 4,844,846 times
Reputation: 1087

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
Southern Maryland is close to the Eastern Shore in similar identity and regional loyalty, however Southern Maryland does not feel disconnected from Annapolis. Many consider Annapolis to be part of Southern Maryland.
Being from Anne Arundel County I can tell you this. There is a dividing line but it's not in Annapolis. The dividing line is the South River. Points north of there, including Annapolis are considered the urban part of the county. Points south of there are rural and many of the old timers don't care for the policies of the Arundel Center. There was a move afoot, about 20 years ago, for the southern part of the county to succeed from the northern part and actually be called South County. The Arundel Center would have none of that (loss of tax revenue) and squashed that idea quick. It was even in the Capital newspaper.

Edgewater is pretty much ruined now with developers, shopping centers and fancy subdivisions. Tons of traffic and serious traffic accidents are the norm in that area. Mayo is holding out a bit but once they start building houses again (sewer improvements must be made first) Mayo will be lost to urbanization.
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Old 04-21-2012, 03:03 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 739,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
Being from Anne Arundel County I can tell you this. There is a dividing line but it's not in Annapolis. The dividing line is the South River. Points north of there, including Annapolis are considered the urban part of the county. Points south of there are rural and many of the old timers don't care for the policies of the Arundel Center. There was a move afoot, about 20 years ago, for the southern part of the county to succeed from the northern part and actually be called South County. The Arundel Center would have none of that (loss of tax revenue) and squashed that idea quick. It was even in the Capital newspaper.

Edgewater is pretty much ruined now with developers, shopping centers and fancy subdivisions. Tons of traffic and serious traffic accidents are the norm in that area. Mayo is holding out a bit but once they start building houses again (sewer improvements must be made first) Mayo will be lost to urbanization.
I see. South River makes more sense as the dividing line. That sort of fits with the definition of Southern Maryland ending around Central Ave. My experience in Anne Arundel is entirely in it's southern portion, so I tend to think of the whole county as Southern Maryland despite it being different up north. It's the same with PG county, my experience is entirely within the areas that are indistinguishable form Charles County so I consider it Southern MD despite the DC suburbs and transplants.
I suppose souther Anne Arundel folks feel more hostile towards Annapolis because it governs and taxes them in two ways, not just one? In Calvert County everyone always seemed at least okay with Annapolis.

Last edited by Tezcatlipoca; 04-21-2012 at 03:19 PM..
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Old 04-24-2012, 06:29 PM
 
Location: PROUD Son of the South in Maryland
386 posts, read 530,683 times
Reputation: 189
I love how some people in Maryland try and ban rebel flags and then "proudly"(at least I do) wave rebel flags. Im in the heart of a bleeding liberal Maryland town (Columbia) and above the community college are not 1 but 2 rebel flags(Maryland and Howard county flags). I got a good laugh out of it, but hey at least it proves the ignorance of so many...
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Old 04-28-2012, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Earth
2,549 posts, read 3,113,694 times
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I've actually seen some rebel flags on some homes in southern PA along business using 'mason dixon' as part of their name. I thought this was strange but I never thought the Confederacy ever made it that far north. It seems that some of the rural southern appalachia WV, MD culture bleeds over the border into PA. I was in Baltimore just the other day and was able to get sweet ice tea and grits where it would be difficult to get in say Rhode Island. Maryland to me seems to be a mix transitional point between north and south. Does this mean Balt-DC would be the largest metro in the South ahead of Dallas-Fort Worth?
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Old 04-28-2012, 03:01 PM
 
Location: PG County, MD
582 posts, read 739,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
I've actually seen some rebel flags on some homes in southern PA along business using 'mason dixon' as part of their name. I thought this was strange but I never thought the Confederacy ever made it that far north. It seems that some of the rural southern appalachia WV, MD culture bleeds over the border into PA.
I live in south-central PA and was rather shocked when I saw rebel flags up here. I never though anything of them back in MD but I figured Pennsylvanians found them offensive and wouldn't fly them. But then I also learned upon moving here that Pennsylvanians in this area at least are hardly what anyone thinks "northerners" are supposed to be like.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
I was in Baltimore just the other day and was able to get sweet ice tea and grits where it would be difficult to get in say Rhode Island.
Thank you. I keep hearing "you can't get sweet tea and grits in MD" to which I say, "yes you can", and the reply is "no you can't". I think I know my own state, thanks. Nice to hear someone actually tried.



Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
Maryland to me seems to be a mix transitional point between north and south.
This is what I and many others been trying to say. Unfortunately people want to put it in a group and it gets stuck in one or the other, when MD hardly fits with either region's archetype.
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Old 04-28-2012, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Greenville, NC
2,051 posts, read 4,844,846 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
Thank you. I keep hearing "you can't get sweet tea and grits in MD" to which I say, "yes you can", and the reply is "no you can't". I think I know my own state, thanks. Nice to hear someone actually tried.
Both of those items can definitely still be had in Maryland although they are getting harder to find. My wife is addicted to grits and she was born and raised in Annapolis, as was I. As the local eating establishments are closed in favor of chain restaurants you're seeing that southern heritage disappear, but it's still there if you look for it.
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Old 04-28-2012, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Earth
2,549 posts, read 3,113,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Martin View Post
As the local eating establishments are closed in favor of chain restaurants you're seeing that southern heritage disappear, but it's still there if you look for it.
Actually, the chains have added the southern heritage to menus around the country. Chains like McDonald's, Denny's etc have added sweet tea, grits to their menus. You didn't have this say 20-30 years ago. I was once ordered a sweet tea at a McDonalds in Manhattan just for kicks because I could. I thought it was strange walking around NYC drinking sweet tea but hey it's available. McDonald's now also serve southern chicken biscuits for breakfast instead of just the Mcmuffin sandwich. Also don't forget the KFC's. Wendy's and Burger King is also serving sweet tea. I frequently go through PA a lot and found more sweet tea in many stores. Even a Pennsylvania based company makes sweet tea Our Story.
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Old 04-28-2012, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Earth
2,549 posts, read 3,113,694 times
Reputation: 1198
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
Thank you. I keep hearing "you can't get sweet tea and grits in MD" to which I say, "yes you can", and the reply is "no you can't". I think I know my own state, thanks. Nice to hear someone actually tried.
Yes, MD is a rather interesting place to discover because of the history of both southern and northern cultural migrations mixing together and how the state evolve into what it is today.

It's really strange how regional cultures tend to travel to other places around the country that you wouldn't think existed. An example would be the Yat tawk dialect in New Orleans actually share the same immigration stock as the NYC dialect. The two dialects are shockingly very similar. Some people in New Orleans have been mistake for New Yorkers because of their accent. Come on a Brooklyn accent in the south that's crazy but yes it's true not many people around the country would know this though because most think New Orleans is Cajun or just southern accents. On the other hand not many people would think Maryland would have any southern influence either. Interesting what we learn isn't it?
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Old 04-29-2012, 03:33 AM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,245 posts, read 5,534,685 times
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I went to a waffle house in Lancaster, PA. Haven't been to one since I was in North Carolina.
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Old 04-29-2012, 08:50 AM
 
Location: PROUD Son of the South in Maryland
386 posts, read 530,683 times
Reputation: 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
I've actually seen some rebel flags on some homes in southern PA along business using 'mason dixon' as part of their name. I thought this was strange but I never thought the Confederacy ever made it that far north. It seems that some of the rural southern appalachia WV, MD culture bleeds over the border into PA. I was in Baltimore just the other day and was able to get sweet ice tea and grits where it would be difficult to get in say Rhode Island. Maryland to me seems to be a mix transitional point between north and south. Does this mean Balt-DC would be the largest metro in the South ahead of Dallas-Fort Worth?
Yeah PA is VERY different from the rest of the north east.

As for sweet tea and grits, its nice to see chains try them but they are never the same. Went bob evens and got grits and while they were OK, they pale in comparison to the way my grandma made them or heck even a maw and paw restaurant. Same goes for mcdonalds sweet tea, nice attempt but too much sugar and its no home brewed Luzianne and real sugar like I always have in my fridge.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanologist View Post
Yes, MD is a rather interesting place to discover because of the history of both southern and northern cultural migrations mixing together and how the state evolve into what it is today.

It's really strange how regional cultures tend to travel to other places around the country that you wouldn't think existed. An example would be the Yat tawk dialect in New Orleans actually share the same immigration stock as the NYC dialect. The two dialects are shockingly very similar. Some people in New Orleans have been mistake for New Yorkers because of their accent. Come on a Brooklyn accent in the south that's crazy but yes it's true not many people around the country would know this though because most think New Orleans is Cajun or just southern accents. On the other hand not many people would think Maryland would have any southern influence either. Interesting what we learn isn't it?
There are pockets where the dialect is not considered SAE (Southern American English) one of them is Charleston and the other is New Orleans area. I dont know why they arent considered SAE, but I have an inkling is due to the creole/cajun being french based. As for why Charleston isnt included is beyond me, but there is a high occupation there/in that area.

As for Maryland being a clash of cultures, thats to be expected in the border states. Youll notice in KY, WV, MD, MO and DE(to a much lesser extent) that the states will exibit a bit of each. Its literally impossible to border a northern state and not have some of its traits near your border culturally, but again PA for the most part is so far different from the rest of the northeast we dont naturally have any northeast culture. The closest might be the northeast corner nearest to philly, but then again its nothing like I remember philly being.

Does Northeast culture exist in Maryland? Sure, but it was imported. Does PA culture exist in Maryland? You bet and it is actually native to the border areas.
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