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Old 03-20-2012, 06:44 AM
 
6,872 posts, read 8,392,073 times
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I was right nearby the one that hit Beltsville and College Park. At the time they said that a tornado in Maryland was a rare event. Which is why this ranking confuses me. It also confuses me because where I grew up, we had far more tornadoes and watches and warnings than we've ever seen here.
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Old 03-20-2012, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Huntingdon County, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkf747 View Post
I was right nearby the one that hit Beltsville and College Park. At the time they said that a tornado in Maryland was a rare event. Which is why this ranking confuses me. It also confuses me because where I grew up, we had far more tornadoes and watches and warnings than we've ever seen here.
A rare event? It doesn't feel that way in Southern Maryland. I honestly can't say how many actual tornadoes there have been, but I remember getting several dark green super-windy skies, the tv beeping tornado in a town nearby, with the big weather maps showing the major pressure spot, and then meeting at least one friend within the week who saw his neighbor's house destroyed, trees all down, or things generally wrecked. There are even huge public sirens for it in some towns.

The study also might be skewed because it's based on 10,000 square miles, and Maryland is less than 10,000 square miles land.
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Old 03-20-2012, 08:48 PM
 
Location: California / Maryland / Cape May
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
A rare event? It doesn't feel that way in Southern Maryland. I honestly can't say how many actual tornadoes there have been, but I remember getting several dark green super-windy skies, the tv beeping tornado in a town nearby, with the big weather maps showing the major pressure spot, and then meeting at least one friend within the week who saw his neighbor's house destroyed, trees all down, or things generally wrecked. There are even huge public sirens for it in some towns.

The study also might be skewed because it's based on 10,000 square miles, and Maryland is less than 10,000 square miles land.
I thought it was a rare event in MD, too. If you're in Southern MD and you're experiencing them there, perhaps that's why I'm not seeing them (other than the one that almost took me out) where I've been in MD. I've never even heard a siren for one. Perhaps the data is accurate after all, as I was wondering where their numbers were coming from.
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Old 03-21-2012, 04:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tezcatlipoca View Post
A rare event? It doesn't feel that way in Southern Maryland. I honestly can't say how many actual tornadoes there have been, but I remember getting several dark green super-windy skies, the tv beeping tornado in a town nearby, with the big weather maps showing the major pressure spot, and then meeting at least one friend within the week who saw his neighbor's house destroyed, trees all down, or things generally wrecked. There are even huge public sirens for it in some towns.

The study also might be skewed because it's based on 10,000 square miles, and Maryland is less than 10,000 square miles land.
I've noticed that you get them in southern Maryland quite a bit more than in the northern parts of the state. Perhaps that is what I'm recalling?
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Old 03-21-2012, 03:17 PM
 
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I can make no sense of the Baltimore Sun article saying "Maryland ranks so high (for tornadoes) because of its population density." ?

An area's population density should have nothing whatsoever to do with causing tornadoes one way or the other. Oklahoma is certainly not densely settled.
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Old 03-23-2012, 07:44 AM
 
Location: California / Maryland / Cape May
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Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
I can make no sense of the Baltimore Sun article saying "Maryland ranks so high (for tornadoes) because of its population density." ?

An area's population density should have nothing whatsoever to do with causing tornadoes one way or the other. Oklahoma is certainly not densely settled.
If you recall back to statistics class, one can rank anything based on the parameters they put on the study. In this case, the Weather Channel was ranking states on tornado activity in relation to population. They're entitled to do so. Also, most humans tend to care more about something as it relates to them, so ranking which states a natural disaster happens in more, by population, while just one way of looking at something, is a way that perhaps more humans would be interested in seeing the numbers. If you don't prefer the numbers that way, there are many other lists to reference.
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Old 03-26-2012, 11:18 PM
 
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Very odd! I have lived here for 10 years and have yet to have a tornado do any damage around my area??
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Old 03-27-2012, 05:57 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Njrover0216 View Post
Very odd! I have lived here for 10 years and have yet to have a tornado do any damage around my area??
That should be something to be glad about.
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Old 03-27-2012, 01:56 PM
 
Location: California / Maryland / Cape May
1,548 posts, read 1,097,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drs72 View Post
Ahh! You beat me to it! Crazy story though. I was just a scared, little five year old huddled in the corner of my basement. I remember it pretty vividly though.
How did I miss this post? Aww, you poor thing! So glad you made it through that.
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Old 03-29-2012, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Edgemere, Maryland
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We've had quite a few in the Edgemere-Essex area over the past 10 years or so. Very small, but reported with damage... and especially a couple of years ago when a guy's house was crushed in Essex by trees downed by the tornado. Waterspouts and funnel clouds are very common, too along these coastal communities. As someone mentioned, I think these things are fed by moisture from the Bay and temperature clashes.
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