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Old 04-02-2012, 09:50 PM
 
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Cumberland (pop. 20,859) is the seat of Allegany County (pop. 75,087) in Western Maryland, and is located essentially haflway between Pittsburgh 115 miles to the northwest and Baltimore/Washington 130 miles to the southeast. Cumberland has an urbanized area population of 51,899 and is the hub of the Cumberland MD-WV Metropolitan Area, which numbers 103,299 (ranking 339th nationally).

Located along I-68 (the elevated highway blasts right through the center of town) in Western Maryland's Ridge and Valley region, Cumberland is situated along the Potomac River. The mountainous terrain dominates Cumberland's urban form, as its neighborhoods twist around narrow valleys and scale steep hillsides. A dramatic and spectacular cityscape full of architectural interest hearkens to an important past.

Fort Cumberland was established by the British Army in the 1750s along what was then British America's western frontier. It was from Fort Cumberland that the British Army launched two unsuccessful attempts to dislodge French forces from Fort Duquesne at the present site of Pittsburgh. In 1754, a 22-year-old George Washington led a force northwest into the highlands near Uniontown, PA... they encountered French forces at the Battle of Jumonville Glen... which would be the opening engagement in the French & Indian War (which would escalate into the Seven Years' War). This was followed by the battle of Fort Necessity. In 1755, General Braddock (accompanied by Washington) led the British Army to a disastrous defeat upriver from Fort Duquesne at the Battle of the Monogahela.

In 1794, President George Washington returned to Cumberland to lead a militia force to quell the Whiskey Rebellion, a response amongst frontier farmers to an excise tax on whiskey.

The City of Cumberland was established in 1787, and it soon became a key transportation hub connecting the East Coast to points west as the National Road (or Cumberland Road... today's U.S. 40), C&O Canal and B&O Railroad all converged on the city. Cumberland grew as a mining and timber hub, and spawned heavy industry. The city was a major producer of glass, tires and paper... but in the latter half of the 20th century... most industrial plants closed. Cumberland and its region spiraled into long-term economic and population decline. The city is trying to leverage its impressive assets as a destination for historical, cultural and outdoors recreation tourism.







Wills Mountain as seen while squeezing through the Cumberland Narrows just west of Cumberland


Downtown




whoa


The main drag Downtown is a pedestrian street... I don't know what the history behind this one is... but these things don't usually pan out as planned... it's a really gorgeous street... big beautiful buildings lining a rather narrow corridor... but there weren't a ton of people about... and the plastic chairs everywhere were kinda ugly

so much bad street furniture


lovely view... but the kiosk is hideous








Cumberland almost has an "Olde Europe" skyline... dominated by steeples amidst the lush mountains


downtown fashion






that storefront sells Maryland-related gifts... it was interesting to see so much Maryland Pride in Cumberland... I thought perhaps due to their isolation geographically and culturally from 99% of Maryland that there might be less of a Maryland self-identification... but homes flew the distinctive Maryland flag and social clubs advertised crab bakes... Cumberland does fly the flags of West Virginia and Pennsylvania in addition to Maryland on this street, however.






crossing Wills Creek... joggers on the Great Allegheny Passage... which leads to Pittsburgh




heading into the West Side of Cumberland... Washington Ave. is full of historic mansions


The Richardsonian Romanesque Allegany County Courthouse (1893) looms over the city from its hilltop perch












i love this apartment building
































the incredible lushness of Cumberland


hilly cities are my favorite


the topography, architecture and neighborhoods result in a dramatic urban environment... Cumberland may be small in population... but it is endlessly fascinating






Urban Appalachia




Canal Place is an urban redevelopment at the western terminus of the C&O Canal... it features shops, restaurants, parkland, museums and trails... it seemed pretty lively but was overrun by ill-tempered teenaged stunt bikers
[IMG=3]http://i531.photobucket.com/albums/dd360/pittsburghrules/cumberland/245.jpg?t=1248816401[/IMG]



bridge crossing the Potomac




Country roads... take me home


one of GW's HQs during the Whiskey Rebellion




This street gave me a Wheeling (WV) feeling




north of downtown... I wish I had more time to explore this working class neighborhood north of downtown... but alas...





...



Frostburg (pop. 9,002) is located 8 miles west of Cumberland on the eastern side of Big Savage Mountain. Located about 2,000 feet above sea level, Frostburg is the highest city in Maryland. I can only assume its name comes from its frosty winters... which are long and cold and average over 100 inches of snow. Its summers are cool too... while it was eveningtime... it definitely felt significantly cooler in Frostburg than nearby Cumberland. Frostburg is home to Frostburg State University (5,215 students).



rolling into Frostburg was really impressive... with its main street climbing a hill and twisting around a bend (two things I love in a main street)
























houses


I forget the name of this small village near the Pennsylvania border just south of Wellersburg, PA
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Old 04-02-2012, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Macao
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I love the topography....houses set up in hills....as well as houses built on a slant. It does have a very Pittsburgh-esque quality.
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Old 04-03-2012, 04:09 AM
 
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Thanks for posting.
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Old 04-03-2012, 08:17 AM
 
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nice. i've always thought cumberland was the most picturesque town in the state.
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Old 04-03-2012, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Cumberland
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The town you photographed south of Wellersburg is Barrelville.

Also, Frostburg wasn't named because of the weather. It is named after Meshach Frost, an early settler who set up an Inn when the National Road was being built through town.

Other than that, nice work.
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:17 AM
 
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Thanks, westside boy. I've enjoyed reading your posts on Western Maryland. I hope to visit Pumpkin Center someday.
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Old 04-03-2012, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Cumberland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Evergrey View Post
Thanks, westside boy. I've enjoyed reading your posts on Western Maryland. I hope to visit Pumpkin Center someday.
You saw the highlights of the city and took some great pictures. The Eastern End of the County is very scenic too. To get to Pumpkin Center I would recommend going out of town on Williams Rd., then take Oliver Beltz Rd. to Bear Hill Rd. Left on Bear Hill up to Pumpkin Center, continue on Upper Town Creek Rd. to Flintstone....I would Mapquest that too, just in case I missed a turn.

It isn't the shortest way, but very scenic.
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Old 04-03-2012, 01:04 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Great shots. I'll show them to my wife as part of another futile attempt to move to Cumberland.
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Old 04-04-2012, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Great photos! As a local, I really appreciate this thread as it will give other Marylanders living downstate the chance to see what our part of the state is really like. Hey, Evergrey, would you mind if I contributed some photos? I'm thinking about taking some snapshots while I'm home this weekend.
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Old 04-04-2012, 02:23 PM
 
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Sure. I really loved exploring Allegany County. Next time I'm in the area, I'd like to try some of this "seasoned lettuce" westsideboy was talking about!
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