U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-10-2013, 12:08 PM
 
334 posts, read 1,325,352 times
Reputation: 97

Advertisements

We are moving to Maryland next month, and I have noticed several homes say they have heat pumps. Are they more expensive to use than say natural gas or electric? Does someone deliver fuel for the pump, or do you get it yourself.

Would it also cool a house?

Thank you for any help.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-10-2013, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,759 posts, read 4,267,022 times
Reputation: 1192
Most are gas or electric so there is no fuel delivery per se. Basically it's a system that works well in some climates and not as well in Maryland's climate. It heats and cools the house.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_pump
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 12:45 PM
 
334 posts, read 1,325,352 times
Reputation: 97
So are you saying you wouldn't recommend one? Are they more costly than forced air gas furnaces?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 12:50 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
26,894 posts, read 57,997,675 times
Reputation: 29341
Quote:
Originally Posted by diamondgirl45 View Post
...I have noticed several homes say they have heat pumps.
That's code for not having natural gas to run a furnace (or water heater or stove) with.

Thirty years ago the builder would have installed an oil burner.
Instead... these homes get to use a lot of electricity instead.
Especially so on the coldest days (when the built in electric heaters need to be used).

Quote:
Would it also cool a house?
Yes. They are in fact a type of AC and use the same equipment and duct etc.
That is the ONLY good thing going for them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by diamondgirl45 View Post
So are you saying you wouldn't recommend one?
I'm saying I wouldn't buy a house that doesn't have natural gas available.
If the house you positively must have has no other choice... it's better than having to deal with fuel oil.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 01:07 PM
 
3,137 posts, read 7,893,613 times
Reputation: 1946
Depends on how warm you like your house in the winter and also depends on how cold it gets. The efficiency of a heat pump is dependent on the difference between the outside temperature and the desired inside temperature.

They're a good solution for people who live in warmer climates and/or like their house cooler in the winter. I have one and live in a similar climate to MD (I'm in VA). I've found it to be pretty cheap, but I also like my house fairly cool in the winter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
9,397 posts, read 13,249,271 times
Reputation: 6219
Quote:
Originally Posted by diamondgirl45 View Post
So are you saying you wouldn't recommend one? Are they more costly than forced air gas furnaces?
It depends. These types of heating systems are popular in the South where it usually doesn't get that cold. Up North, gas and heating oil are more popular.

Since Maryland is in the weird North/South buffer zone, I don't think heat pumps are much more expensive than gas furnaces.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Sneads Ferry, NC
11,094 posts, read 18,656,197 times
Reputation: 4996
Quote:
Originally Posted by HurricaneDC View Post
Since Maryland is in the weird North/South buffer zone, I don't think heat pumps are much more expensive than gas furnaces.
The availablity of natural gas follows strange patterns also. For example, most of Ellicott City has natural gas, but there places where there is no alternative but a heat pump. On the whole, I would prefer natural gas, as the air feels warmer out of the vents.

What the OP should really avoid are those electric baseboard heaters. Some cheap, older homes have them, and they are more expensive to run than heat pumps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 02:22 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,168 posts, read 39,263,926 times
Reputation: 40670
A heat pump is really efficient as an air conditioner but, as mentioned, not so good in MD as heat. Many people supplement with propane/natural gas, oil or some form of wood heat.

The heating function can really hike your bill when outside temperatures fall much below 35F, that usually triggers the backup system in the unit which is electric resistance heat.

The key to heat pumps is to set the temperature and leave it alone. Knocking it back at night then raising it in the morning really uses the kilowatts.

Heating with a heat pump is usually quite a bit more expensive than natural gas or oil and a bit more than bottled propane.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 04:54 PM
 
334 posts, read 1,325,352 times
Reputation: 97
Well that is a lot to consider. We are looking at rentals right now. I am glad I asked this before buying a house though.
Our house is usually around 71 degrees (I would have it at 68 if everyone else would let me). I am moving from Michigan, which tends to be cooler than Maryland, so I don't know hoe heating bills will compare.
Thanks for your help.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-10-2013, 05:38 PM
 
342 posts, read 1,294,639 times
Reputation: 213
My heat pump heats my house in the southeastern suburbs of Baltimore. It gets pretty cold at times where the heat pump runs continuously but I've never seen the backup electric heat kick in during a normal heating cycle, only during the defrost cycle. Sometimes, in cold weather the compressor time delay will hold the compressor out for five minutes at the beginning of the cycle during which time the indoor fan recirculates room air which is where the bad rap of heat pumps blowing cold air comes from. Otherwise, it does blow warm air. I think there are people who will misuse a heat pump, that is, use the electric back-up or emergency heat as the primary heat in the winter. It's not designed for that use. If the OP found a place she liked I wouldn't rule it out because it had a heat pump.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top