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Old 04-29-2015, 03:24 PM
 
Location: DC
2,037 posts, read 2,140,287 times
Reputation: 1773

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeyserSoze View Post
Baltimore and Washington aren't geographically northern, they're right in the middle of the Eastern Seaboard. People in this area refer to it as the Mid-Atlantic, which in this area tends to mean a mix between Northeast and Southeast, because they really don't consider themselves either (or maybe they consider themselves both) and characteristics of both regions are noticeable, one moreso than the other depending on what part of the state you are in (though I tend to question the "Northeasterness" of the state and if it's really being confused with the "General Standard American" that seems to be so prevalent today in this country).

Some say that Baltimore is like Philadelphia, and there are some similarities, but I wouldn't say they're very similar. Philadelphia is old, larger and has more of a Northeast "urban" wordly feel and mindset. Baltimore is old, large and urban, and in parts it looks Northeastern, but compared to Philadelphia it's smaller and has a "local" feel and mindset and has this very, very subtle Southern undercurrent to it. Philly has the "local" feel too, but it doesn't define the city or the feel of it the way it seems to do for Baltimore. Some say it's a big town with a small-town mindset -- "Smalltimore" -- and I certainly get that feeling. More than its look, Philadelphia feels Northeastern while Baltimore is dubious. I think Baltimore is just very quintessentially Maryland or Mid-Atlantic -- whatever that may be. I don't know if you could or couldn't say if Baltimore's suburbs are like the Philly suburbs, but I've noticed that the Baltimore suburbs vary differently depending in what part of the metro you're in. Some suburbs feel very "Baltimore", some suburbs feel very bland and generic, and some suburbs also have ties to DC.

The Washington DC area is kind of like the Raleigh area with a small, small touch of Atlanta. New, modern, in-demand, booming, and sprawling with legions of transplants and similar economies. It's not so much a city as its a general area. Moreso than the Baltimore area, you'll notice that the DC part of Maryland has slightly more of a Southern undercurrent to it, especially when you get outside of the Beltway and into the suburbs of PG, Charles and Calvert counties (Anne Arundel, too). You could also make the argument that Washington DC itself is like New York in the sense that its a world class city where people from all over the world come to live and visit, but DC is different from NYC.

You'll notice that there are people from NC and GA live in the DC area and there are some who live in the Baltimore area, as well. But you'll also notice people from PA and NY who live in the Baltimore area, and in the DC area, too.
I would not compare DC to Atlanta at all, people try to but the cities cannot be more different, it share almost nothing. For one it is a dense walkable city, though a very small one. From an urban planning perspective it's closest analog is not Atlanta, but BOSTON.

Both Raliegh and Atlanta are far to spread out to be compared to DC, or for that matter Baltimore.

The density of cities falls off considerably once you get past Washington, DC. But the ENTIRE BosWash corridor the cities share more with each other than they share with cities outside the corridor.

My advice, quit trying to compare DC with southern cities. It's less religous, better educated, more dense, with better public transit infrastructure. Our inner suburbs are more dense than many of these southern cities.
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Old 04-29-2015, 03:26 PM
 
Location: DC
2,037 posts, read 2,140,287 times
Reputation: 1773
Quote:
Originally Posted by the resident09 View Post
I don't understand where these Raleigh, Charlotte, Atlanta topics come from, none of them remotely remind me of anything to do with DC or Baltimore, not even an inch.

Even Richmond is much different than those three.
I have no clue where the comparisons come from. The reality is DC has more in common with western coastal cities of Portland and San Francisco than it does to these southern cities.

The mid-atlantic designation fits (and philly is part of it as well), because these cities are identifiably different than southern cities which are largely just downtown offices and surrounded by suburban housing. DC and Philly both fall into the category of walkable urban. Baltimore would if it didn't have so much blight breaking up walksheds. Calling DC or Baltimore southern though, is kind of an insult, which is why they are definitely NOT southern. Active dislike of the south is pretty present in both cities with both the white and black populations. A city such as DC which passed gay marriage early has more in common with Boston or SF than it does with any backwards bible beating bigoted southern anything.
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Old 04-29-2015, 04:21 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 2,996,910 times
Reputation: 1605
Southern cities are more suburban, and not as dense. This is definitely one of the biggest differences between cities like Raleigh and DC. Richmond is pretty dense, but I'd say Richmond is a transition zone between the South and Mid-Atlantic. The history in Richmond is undeniably southern.
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Old 04-29-2015, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,626 posts, read 24,848,602 times
Reputation: 11190
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictSonic View Post
The mid-atlantic designation fits (and philly is part of it as well), because these cities are identifiably different than southern cities which are largely just downtown offices and surrounded by suburban housing.
"Mid-Atlantic" means next to nothing in the Delaware Valley. Nobody there says "I'm from the Mid Atlantic." Note the difference among the Wiki pages.

Quote:
Located in the Northeastern United States at the confluence of the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers, Philadelphia is the economic and cultural center of the Delaware Valley.
Philadelphia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
Founded in 1729, Baltimore is the second largest seaport in the Mid-Atlantic United States and is situated closer to Midwestern markets than any other major seaport on the East Coast.
Baltimore - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
Washington, D.C., is located in the Mid-Atlantic Region of the U.S. East Coast.
Washington, D.C. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
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Old 04-29-2015, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
27,626 posts, read 24,848,602 times
Reputation: 11190
Quote:
Originally Posted by DistrictSonic View Post
I would not compare DC to Atlanta at all, people try to but the cities cannot be more different, it share almost nothing. For one it is a dense walkable city, though a very small one. From an urban planning perspective it's closest analog is not Atlanta, but BOSTON.
He said "Washington, DC area" not Washington, DC. Most of the "DC" posters live in the Washington, DC suburbs, which is where 89% of the people in the region live (the suburbs). And the suburbs, NOVA especially, ain't that different from the Atlanta burbs. There's also a great deal of similarity between PG and Dekalb Counties.
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Old 05-01-2015, 03:04 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
20,538 posts, read 25,753,572 times
Reputation: 8171
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
"Mid-Atlantic" means next to nothing in the Delaware Valley. Nobody there says "I'm from the Mid Atlantic." Note the difference among the Wiki pages.



Philadelphia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Baltimore - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Washington, D.C. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
In the 40+ years that I lived in the Delaware Valley I didn't know a soul who didn't identify as MidAtlantic.
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