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Old 12-14-2009, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Montgomery Village, MD
516 posts, read 777,349 times
Reputation: 220
Default What could be done about traffic

in this area and why is it not happening?

I often really wonder why in the world 270 hasn't been widened.. is there a reason or is it money related?
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Old 12-14-2009, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Montgomery Village
4,104 posts, read 1,759,380 times
Reputation: 1636
I see you were caught in the traffic this morning trying to get on to 270 as well. I dunno about traffic, but i would have been nicer if the metro was extended beyond shady grove. But thats just a dream.
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Old 12-16-2009, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
205 posts, read 516,150 times
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Traffic was abnormally bad on 100 late yesterday too. I have no idea what was wrong with people yesterday.

I don't think widening is going to help 270. What they need to do is add a highway that complements 270. Maryland's highway infrastructure is severely underdeveloped to serve the needs of the dense population in this area. Another option would be to extend multiple metro lines. Personally, I want to see the installation of some sort of elevated rail to better connect homes and businesses together so people don't have to rely so much on automotive transportation. Legislators in this area really need to get serious about the problem and put real money and effort behind projects instead of letting activists or special interest groups derail improving the area's transit options. Everyone has to go somewhere therefore these kinds of projects would be beneficial.
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Old 12-16-2009, 10:18 AM
 
Location: South Shore of Boston
771 posts, read 1,368,479 times
Reputation: 394
I agree that widening roads is not the answer, especially in the long run. The truth is that traffic is only going to get worse, much worse, as time goes on. And one can only widen a road so much.

The answer lies in better transit options, and more people telecommuting.
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Old 12-16-2009, 01:48 PM
 
3,063 posts, read 5,007,434 times
Reputation: 1875
Or redirecting development to areas of the country that sorely need it. The Fedgov could do a lot more to address sprawl vs. decline just with its own decisions. There's plenty of places in the USA where you could live like a king on a GS-12 salary. Move some more offices there!
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Old 12-16-2009, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
205 posts, read 516,150 times
Reputation: 160
The major problem we have right now is that there is commonly only one path to get to where you need to go. 270 and 695 west side are the perfect examples. More people are living around it and depend on it to get to where they need to go. There is no alternate highway to take. There is no parallel freeway to help distribute traffic. There is no mass transit option that doesn't rely on the same congested roads. There's a single point of failure creating a botteneck. Simply widening the bottleneck only allows it to serve more traffic at a time without addressing the buildup that causes the bottleneck area to fill to capacity. New highways, new rail transit, and new metro lines are the only solution at this point. I really wish they'd take some sort of elevated electric rail or monorail and put stations in major housing developments, shopping centers, and business parks so people could ride that around to get where they want to go rather than being forced to rely on automotive transportation. It really makes me sick how legislators talk about increasing gas taxes, vehicle taxes, registration, tolls, and so on because of how bad automobiles are yet they fail to actually provide an alternative.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
Or redirecting development to areas of the country that sorely need it. The Fedgov could do a lot more to address sprawl vs. decline just with its own decisions. There's plenty of places in the USA where you could live like a king on a GS-12 salary. Move some more offices there!
I don't see why the state government can't already do this on their own. The feds can only put their offices where there is sufficient infrastructure to support all the people who would work there. Builders prefer to build on inexpensive tracts of land near existing road infrastructure. Neither is going to go out random into the rural areas and put in a major development. If MD were to get serious about extending 32, 795, and constructing outer beltways around DC and Baltimore it would help distribute people. Non-road-based transit would be great too. The feds could come in and just build their own highways, but that's nearly impossible too because of states' rights, activist groups, and perceived favortism. The state really needs to get involved and stop passing the buck and upgrading just things in the cities.
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Old 12-16-2009, 03:38 PM
 
783 posts, read 1,517,070 times
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270 south of MV Ave has already been widened. I remember right after the widening, it was great. It ended with the HOV corridor. The only thing that can help traffic is if more people TCed. You have to get the cars OFF the street. Simple Ever notice how easy the commute is when the Feds have a holiday.
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Old 12-16-2009, 03:56 PM
 
3,063 posts, read 5,007,434 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDragon View Post
The feds can only put their offices where there is sufficient infrastructure to support all the people who would work there.
Plenty of areas have that, starting with, say, Detroit...
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Old 12-16-2009, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Montgomery Village, MD
516 posts, read 777,349 times
Reputation: 220
Yeah I totally agree that they need to move the gov jobs around a bit. HECK even moving them out to western MD would help a little
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Old 12-16-2009, 07:38 PM
 
3,063 posts, read 5,007,434 times
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Agreed, there definitely needs to be more white-collar work around Cumberland to save what should be a beautiful little city.
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