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Old 07-11-2010, 04:53 PM
 
19 posts, read 32,145 times
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Okay so I am planning a cross country move from Oregon to Mass. when I finish school and I was wondering if anyone could offer up any informaiton on the public transportation. I have two young kids and know that MA is one of the best places in the US as far as schools but they love the country life. The job available to me is in Framingham and I know alittle about the town but enough to know I need more country and less urban. How far out is the country from Framingham? or atleast smaller towns with alittle more room from the neighbors? I still would like the conviences of the grocery store and big box stores close but don't know what to expect when I go. I would like to ride the train out from town but how far does it go?
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Old 07-11-2010, 04:59 PM
 
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Welcome! There are quite a few towns nearby that are more rural than Framingham. Depending on how country you'd like, you could try Holliston (suburban but more country than Framingham), Sherborn (very quiet, very highly rated schools & also very expensive), and then further west Berlin and Bolton are very quiet and pretty towns with horse farms, apple orchards, and such. However, you'd really need to drive to any of them.

The Framingham train line does run through Grafton, which is quite pretty and rural in parts. That might be an option as well.

The Framingham train line runs from Boston through Framingham out to Worcester, but Worcester is a city and is definately not country. There are towns such as Holden that are nearby to Worcester that have more of a rural feel in parts, and the housing is less expensive than in the towns closer to Framingham, but the drive might be a hassle.

You can find more info about the trains at www.mbta.com. They also have a handy tool where you can type in an address and find the closest commuter rail stop to that location.

I hope that's helpful! :-)
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Old 07-11-2010, 11:50 PM
 
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Framingham is the big town in its vicinity, so many neighborhoods there are more densely populated than you'd find in a number of nearby towns. There are plenty of towns with less population density nearby. There are also commuter rail lines radiating out from Boston, so there is public transit well outside the city. The tricky part is that those rail lines spread farther apart the farther out you go, so you can be very close to a train station in some areas but have a bit of a drive to the nearest station from other areas. Of the towns Kmann-S. suggested, only Grafton has a commuter rail station right in town, though most of the towns suggested are adjacent to towns with train stations.

Your housing budget is another factor that will affect your choices. The area around Framingham is one of the more expensive sections of the Boston metro area for housing, so this could reduce the choices unless you have a very large budget for housing. Holliston and Hopkinton are two very nice towns, with good schools and fairly low population density, close to Framingham, which also generally have lower house prices than many towns in the area. From either of those towns you would have to drive to the next-door town of Ashland for the commuter train.

Natick, the next town east of Framingham, is a nice upper-middle-class town, with commuter rail service, which could work depending on how "country" you want your surroundings to be. Much of Natick is classic pleasant suburbia, lots of 1/4 to 1/3 of an acre. South Natick has larger lots and a more woodsy feel, but this also leads to generally higher property costs, and a bit of a trip to the train stations, which are located more toward the central part of town.
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Old 07-25-2010, 10:19 PM
 
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Curiosity begs me to ask this question but how high are the rents for a 4 bedroom house somewhere off the commuter line more country preferred and I am saying country in the sense that my neighbors aren't on top of me and there is some land, woods or whatever around?
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Old 07-25-2010, 10:27 PM
 
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I always considered Framingham a pretty small community. Anyways, you'll be able to find a pokey ruralish place to live not too far out. Public transit there may be an issue. The Commuter rail only makes one stop in Framingham, so you'd have to go at least a town over. Maybe Westborough or Ashland would be something like what you're looking for. Check out the places between Framingham and Worcester on the line: MBTA Commuter Rail > Framingham / Worcester Lines Schedules and Maps
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Old 07-26-2010, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Newton, Mass.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a113antonia View Post
Curiosity begs me to ask this question but how high are the rents for a 4 bedroom house somewhere off the commuter line more country preferred and I am saying country in the sense that my neighbors aren't on top of me and there is some land, woods or whatever around?
Be careful-although Framingham is served by the commuter rail, the commuter rail (as its name suggests) is mostly useful for commuting in to Boston. Thus most jobs in Framingham, in office parks out by the highways, are not near the Framingham train station. There's little point in taking the train if you're going to be stuck in downtown Framingham three miles from work with no easy way to get there.

There are plenty of towns near Framingham that are considerably more country or woodsy than Framingham itself. Some, such as neighboring Sudbury or Sherborn, are very expensive. Others, a bit farther away, are less expensive.

Rents really depend on the location, the size and condition of the house, etc. What is your preferred range?
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Old 03-10-2011, 09:45 PM
 
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I don't even know what the prices are :/ I have booked a flight for late September to come check out some of the towns suggested and make a decision. I am quite excited about the journey, thank you for all of the information that you all have offered.
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Old 03-14-2011, 01:40 PM
 
45 posts, read 151,338 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a113antonia View Post
Curiosity begs me to ask this question but how high are the rents for a 4 bedroom house somewhere off the commuter line more country preferred and I am saying country in the sense that my neighbors aren't on top of me and there is some land, woods or whatever around?
you can go boston.craigslist.org and run a quick search in the "apartments for rent" section. Just type in your town of interest (Say, Framingham, or Natick) and number of bedrooms, it'll give you an idea of price range, most ads have pictures.
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Old 03-14-2011, 01:47 PM
 
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Zillow has a new feature (as of last week, I think) that shows estimated rents for individual properties - it's obviously based on estimate for the property itself but it's fun for homeowners to see an estimate of what they could expect to get in rent should they decide to rent out the house.

generally speaking, houses in the suburbs of Boston are more spread out than they are in places like Portland or Beaverton (I don't know what part of Oregon you are coming from). there is relatively little tract housing in Massachusetts and even when houses are developed all at once they are placed further apart. I've always been struck by how close houses are to each other in Oregon (from what I've seen - certainly the vineyards in wine country are further apart. :-) ).
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