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Old 08-17-2007, 05:41 AM
 
12 posts, read 40,586 times
Reputation: 10
I think MovingForward: you are either board - or childish. I've gotten the information I came here for - time being anyway. You are more than welcome to not read or participate in any post. I wish you all the best!

 
Old 08-17-2007, 05:44 AM
 
639 posts, read 2,408,039 times
Reputation: 491
Good morning Providential Man,

What a forum thread THIS one turned out to be! So much controversy with it all, my my my!

What about looking for a place to live with that many acres in Spain or France? Did you ever consider checking there? My brother in law's mother lives in Spain part of the year and she's British; right from London most of her life. It always amazed me that you can go from one country to the next in Europe to live and you can travel there in no time. I think that is so wonderful. She's actually in the northeast corner of Spain and she has told us many many times that there's thousands upon thousands of acres of vast land with stunning scenery there and huge amounts of older type properties, alot for sale or else vacant land waiting for developers to come along. It's certainly some place else to consider.

What decisions you have.

I hope that now that you're getting your rude awakening from a few of us "rude American posters" in city-data, that by now you know that New England is very similar to Great Britain when it comes right down to it, in a lot of ways. For instance, did you know that we have quite a lot of towns and cities that were named after places in England? My cousins live in Exeter, New Hampshire, which is also in England. There's quite a lot of towns and cities that are sister towns to places in the UK. Arlington, Massachusetts? You have Portarlington, am I correct? Cambridge, MA. and Cambridge, England and there's Taunton, MA. and Taunton, England; Worcester, MA. and Worcester, England. I'm sure the list could go on. I know there's a Newmarket, New Hampshire and a Newmarket, England too!

Cheers!

Last edited by CityGirl52; 08-17-2007 at 06:27 AM..
 
Old 08-17-2007, 07:08 AM
 
3,033 posts, read 5,815,495 times
Reputation: 777
How about Marblehead Neck? I know someone there who cashed in on all his Texas Instruments stock and options, made millions and retired there. Only very wealthy people live there--it's very exclusive.

Not sure about the 15,000 sq ft though. Sheesh, who'd want to clean all those bathrooms? LOL
 
Old 08-17-2007, 08:29 AM
 
967 posts, read 3,163,386 times
Reputation: 237
Harvest House Tour scheduled for Sept. 16
Four prominent Sherborn properties representing the unique history and character of Sherborn will be featured on the second annual Harvest House Tour. The tour, scheduled for Sept. 16 from 1-5 p.m., will benefit the Sherborn Library.

The tour features a sprawling 55-acre estate complemented by Olmsted brothers-designed grounds, an in-ground pool set in the walls of an English garden, and an antique potting shed. The 18-room colonial residence, which is sited above a rolling hillside and overlooks a landscape of hayfields, forest, streams, pond and meadow, was designed by a renowned Boston architect in the 1920s.

Another estate features an elegant 1939 whitewashed brick colonial with French garden beds adjoining its multi-level terrace. The terrace is graced with a wisteria-laced pergola and looks out onto the property’s 26 sloping acres. The homeowner’s collection of vintage race cars will be on display on the day of the tour.

Complementing these estates will be two properties that figure prominently in the history of Sherborn. A former dairy farm surrounded by stone wall bordered fields and pastures includes both an original 18th-century residence and a 19th-century Italianate-style home. The current owners have added an equestrian riding facility and use the property’s antique barn to house its five thoroughbred horses.

A former tavern dating back to the Revolution whose second-floor ballroom once hosted Sherborn Town Meetings will also be showcased on the tour. The original house has been enlarged and renovated with an eye towards preserving its historic character.

Tickets for the Harvest House Tour fundraiser will go on sale at the Sherborn Library starting on Sept. 1. Ticket prices are $35 in advance and $40 on the day of the house tour. Tickets will be sold at the library on the day of the tour.

Each home will feature the work of local florists, including the Boggestow Garden Club, the Sherborn Garden Club, Farmer Braun and Plants & Design, and area caterers, such as the Sherborn Inn, That Hits the Spot, Big Fresh and Legal Sea Foods.
 
Old 08-17-2007, 10:23 AM
 
7,352 posts, read 6,005,011 times
Reputation: 1849
Well, I am bored, but not childish. You've told so many lies in your posts, it's amazing. How is it possible for someone to have visited Boston and not know that they weree in New England? You're either a moron or a liar. No matter. I'm done here.
 
Old 08-17-2007, 10:49 AM
 
Location: in a house
5,852 posts, read 1,358,424 times
Reputation: 4890
Quote:
Originally Posted by Providential Man View Post
I think MovingForward: you are either board - or childish. I've gotten the information I came here for - time being anyway. You are more than welcome to not read or participate in any post. I wish you all the best!
Mr. PM, I would very much like to know precisely what it is that you do in the "medical field' that affords you such a luxuriously expensive piece of land in an area that any one with any intelligence would have advisors to help him with his purchasing power and would have done extensive research on a more professional level before persuing advice from a site on the net from complete strangers. I have always associated wealth with a well educated individual that has made wise financial choices or someone that inherited it but usually has had an extensive education to complete their future. I have to wonder when someone who is wealthy enough to buy a $10,000,000 property (in an area that he is totally unfamiliar with) cannot so something as simple as knowing how to spell. Just makes one wonder????? Just make sure that you have someone that can look over the fine print of your impending mortgage. Oh, and why rent a car if you visit Boston when you can hire a chauffer that knows the area??
 
Old 08-17-2007, 12:28 PM
 
967 posts, read 3,163,386 times
Reputation: 237
Puf, I'm really surprised at you for being so harsh. You've asked for tons of advice on the list and been welcomed, yet now because someone is new to the area, has an unusual story, and misspells something he's a pariah? Perhaps English isn't his first language. Or perhaps he's in a rush. I don't care if P'Man is for real or a 13-year-old kid playing games, if someone's on the list and asks a question one can choose to answer it or not. He's been polite and grateful for the advice, and I hope that as an online community we can remain kind and welcoming to one another.
 
Old 08-17-2007, 12:35 PM
 
Location: in a house
5,852 posts, read 1,358,424 times
Reputation: 4890
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarletfire View Post
Puf, I'm really surprised at you for being so harsh. You've asked for tons of advice on the list and been welcomed, yet now because someone is new to the area, has an unusual story, and misspells something he's a pariah? Perhaps English isn't his first language. Or perhaps he's in a rush. I don't care if P'Man is for real or a 13-year-old kid playing games, if someone's on the list and asks a question one can choose to answer it or not. He's been polite and grateful for the advice, and I hope that as an online community we can remain kind and welcoming to one another.
Yes, I have asked for tons of advice, but I have also taken the time to do my own research before asking questionable questions. Guess it's my cynical side coming out....I just don't like a possible poser putting on the nice people that have helped me. If I am wrong about my feeling, then I am truly sorry to offend, but it seems from other posts that others have their doubts too.
 
Old 08-17-2007, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
3,822 posts, read 5,533,749 times
Reputation: 2874
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarletfire View Post
Puf, I'm really surprised at you for being so harsh. You've asked for tons of advice on the list and been welcomed, yet now because someone is new to the area, has an unusual story, and misspells something he's a pariah? Perhaps English isn't his first language. Or perhaps he's in a rush. I don't care if P'Man is for real or a 13-year-old kid playing games, if someone's on the list and asks a question one can choose to answer it or not. He's been polite and grateful for the advice, and I hope that as an online community we can remain kind and welcoming to one another.
I dont understand some of the hostility myself. I've seen stranger posts on this forum. The moderators might as well link this to the "People in Massachusetts are rude" thread.
 
Old 08-17-2007, 01:19 PM
 
Location: Mebane, NC
143 posts, read 311,410 times
Reputation: 179
FWIW: As a transplanted born-and-raised New Englander (now happily living in the South), I've never heard a native New Englander use the term "freeway"- which is a more West Coast expression. ;-) "Expressway" is most frequently used (Northeast Expressway, etc.) for limited-access highways (or "Interstate"). Most places (not all) in the northeast that are called "Turnpike" are toll roads (Mass. Pike, Everett Turnpike, Maine Turnpike, etc.) (Of course, there are very old roads, such as the Middlesex Turnpike, that USED to be toll roads over 100 years ago!) Most of the interstates are known only by their numbers (i.e, "495" for I-495, or "Route 495"). Verbal distinctions in road descriptions are not frequently made in the area by natives. Thus, it becomes a little confusing to non-natives when someone refers to "Route 3" to know what its "layout" is like (mostly limited-access, in this case).
Interstates are equivalent to dual carriageway Motorways;
US Highways are part of the older, pre-Interstate system and are probably closest to the "A" roads in the UK;
State Highways are usually, but not always, of fewer lanes and less-traveled and roughly equivalent to the "B" roads (if memory serves -- it's been 10 years since I've driven in the UK!). Sometimes, they grow bigger than their original size (Rte. 2 comes to mind).
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