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Old 04-16-2017, 03:49 PM
 
306 posts, read 158,573 times
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Milton is on the Mattapan Trolley that connects in at Ashmont.
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Old 04-17-2017, 07:38 AM
A02
 
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Natick is really growing into a nice, diverse town that really has pride in it's older downtown area. It's super convenient to shopping and access to the Pike and commuter rail.

That said, commuting to Cambridge from the Framingham/Worchester commuter rail can be maddening. Switching to - and riding - the Red Line is the wildcard. A lot of times, the Red Line can be delayed, slow, full etc. There were times where getting from Central Square to South Station took LONGER than my commuter rail trip from South Station to Wellesley Square. Certain trains express to Natick though which could be a lifesaver in terms of time.

Where in Cambridge are you working? Kendall?
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Old 04-17-2017, 11:52 AM
 
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How about Millis? It only has 7000 people in the town so you are very likely to find roads that aren't busy. For some odd reason the housing prices are cheaper but I do think that is changing.

Also, it is 5 minutes to the Franklin line. As someone who used to take the Framingham line I highly recommend the Franklin line. It is almost aways on time and there is just TONS of parking at the Norfolk and Walpole stations. Also Holliston, Sherborn, Dover, and Norfolk (though not sure how the schools are). It is also not too far from the Framingham / Needham line so if say you have go in at off hours due to a doctors appointment etc... you can just take an extra 15 minutes.

Last edited by EmilyFoxSeaton; 04-17-2017 at 12:00 PM..
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Old 05-07-2017, 07:13 AM
 
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Hello Friends,
We thought we nailed one condo ($800K) in Arlington, MA. But after inspection, several issues came up. Scariest of all is the high presence of radon (>6.5cPi/L) in the basement. I assume radon will be in the soil, carpet, wall, water and everywhere- any remedial measure to get rid off radon permanently? If permanent removal is not possible, how frequently this radon removal should be carried out after first stage of radon removal? With a little one with us, we are very concerned whether we should go for this house. Please advise.
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Old 05-07-2017, 07:23 AM
 
5,000 posts, read 4,985,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buddies43 View Post
Hello Friends,
We thought we nailed one condo ($800K) in Arlington, MA. But after inspection, several issues came up. Scariest of all is the high presence of radon (>6.5cPi/L) in the basement. I assume radon will be in the soil, carpet, wall, water and everywhere- any remedial measure to get rid off radon permanently? If permanent removal is not possible, how frequently this radon removal should be carried out after first stage of radon removal? With a little one with us, we are very concerned whether we should go for this house. Please advise.
It's very common in the area. Typically, a radon mitigation system is installed. I would expect $1,000-$2,000 for this. But where you want to worry most, are levels in the bedrooms where you spend the most time (particularly at the height of your beds).
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Old 05-07-2017, 07:42 AM
 
Location: East Coast
1,703 posts, read 810,411 times
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Radon mitigation is very easy. Radon is common in the northeast. It's not expensive to remediate. Really, people should re-test occasionally, but most people don't.

I wouldn't pass on a home with high radon, because it's everywhere and any house can have it. Our last house, that we bought in Pennsylvania had high radon. Sellers remediated it, and we didn't have a problem. Radon was still low when we sold it 13 years later.
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Old 05-07-2017, 07:45 AM
 
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Thanks. Actually, that level of radon is found in one of the bedrooms that is in the basement.
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Old 05-07-2017, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Needham, MA
5,833 posts, read 7,537,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buddies43 View Post
Hello Friends,
We thought we nailed one condo ($800K) in Arlington, MA. But after inspection, several issues came up. Scariest of all is the high presence of radon (>6.5cPi/L) in the basement. I assume radon will be in the soil, carpet, wall, water and everywhere- any remedial measure to get rid off radon permanently? If permanent removal is not possible, how frequently this radon removal should be carried out after first stage of radon removal? With a little one with us, we are very concerned whether we should go for this house. Please advise.
I've never heard of anyone saying that radon "gets into things." A mitigation system will likely take care of your issue. If you disclose to the seller that the radon level is above 4.0 this is now a known defect that they are required to disclose to other buyers. So, most sellers will install a mitigation system at their own expense rather than having to start over and hope that they find a buyer who won't mind the radon.

I've been in a lot of houses and a properly installed mitigation system always seems to do the job. I always write into my contracts that the radon needs to be tested again after installation of the system and that it needs to come in at under 4.0 just to add a little additional protection for the buyer.
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Old 05-07-2017, 08:42 AM
 
Location: East Coast
1,703 posts, read 810,411 times
Reputation: 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buddies43 View Post
Thanks. Actually, that level of radon is found in one of the bedrooms that is in the basement.
Basements always have the highest levels. It seeps in through the rocks/ground.
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Old 05-07-2017, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Needham, MA
5,833 posts, read 7,537,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
Basements always have the highest levels. It seeps in through the rocks/ground.
Yes. The gas is created during the decomposition of certain minerals in the soil. Granite is actually a source of radon.
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