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Old 12-28-2017, 08:51 PM
 
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^My greater point is not to defend Hopkinton. But, at $600k, if you don’t like those towns, maybe this area is not for you. You're certainly limited at that price point a bit.

All of those towns listed above will be cheaper than teir 1 suburbs here. From an aesthetics stand point, probably a good deal. But, I’m not trading Philly/PA for Boston/MA. Nope no chance. Now NYC suburbs? That’s something I’d consider if I needed to.

As for the Stamford parade comment.. huh? Are you insinuating towns in MA don't have parades? You'll be happy to know both of my reccomendstions, Andover and Concord, have xmas parades and tree lighting events. Both have nice farmers markets, town runs, etc.

Again, this sounds like a you and your friends/family issue. Either that, or you're terrible at choosing towns that suit your liking. You said you don't think there are many nice suburbs around Boston, regardless of price, right? That there simply aren't a lot. Winchester, Lexington, Belmont, Wellesley, Weston, Newton, Needham, Manchester by the Sea, Marblehead, Hingham, Duxbury, Concord, Andover are all wonderful. Do you disagree?

Last edited by mwj119; 12-28-2017 at 09:06 PM..
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Old 12-28-2017, 09:35 PM
 
Location: North Quabbin, MA
901 posts, read 1,118,542 times
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One nice thing about the 21st century's unimaginable levels of metropolitan gentrification and COL is that it's gotten so out of hand that many smaller cities and towns, forgotten in past decades, are quietly beginning to come back to life as people working in fields without the amazing salaries that mwj119 takes for granted as a millennial birthright for happening to have the right professional proclivities, move to farther-out places that a "civilized" middle class Massahole didn't have to consider back a couple decades when houses in Cambridge cost $150k, and undertake interesting business and cultural ventures. In Mass - smaller places like Lowell, New Bedford, Easthampton, Greenfield, Gloucester, Plymouth, Hudson, Maynard, and even Worcester come to mind as experiencing some socioeconomic boost and arts and cultural renewal, places formerly uniformly gritty, without being gentrified quite yet as they fill up with wayward $40-$70k salary scumrats seeking relief. Often drawing people interesting enough to look beyond semi-hollow suburban hand-wringing factors like school "quality." As mwj points out, Malden and Chelsea soon to follow the Somerville pattern too.

Last edited by FCMA; 12-28-2017 at 10:00 PM..
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Old 12-28-2017, 09:42 PM
 
649 posts, read 596,889 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
This idea that the only people that agree or can live in Boston are in their 50s is just ridiculous. You sound so old and bitter and stale. I’m a millennial- Hi! Living amongst all of my peers who grew up here. We had a blast in Boston. I left to try something new, and came back because I love it. As did they. Millennials in tech or consulting, for example, deal with the high cost of living because it’s the tech hub of the east coast. It’s tough to complain when you’re selling a SaaS solution, work 4 days a week, and make $250k at 28. It’s great that they can bounce between sub areas, like travel tech to cyber security. For consultants, a strong private sector is opportunity. BCG and Bain aside, Boston hosts a ton of Big 4 advisory and all sorts of alternative consulting companies- IT or management related. Again, huge amounts of young folks pulling in $150k at 25-35 years old.

Add all of the cities nurses and doctors, all of the brain power that MIT/Harvard/BC is pumping our, the research and development, etc etc. Plenty of young people call it home, and will never have to leave due to high COL. They’ll either tolerate it, or they’ll make big wages in the sectors that offer it. That will manifest itself.

As someone who was once you I completely get that you think this, but it is not true. I was making $250k a year at 30 in Boston in tech years ago. I have lived the "dream." It is not sustainable, but you don't know that yet.
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Old 12-28-2017, 10:01 PM
 
3,037 posts, read 1,663,637 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FCMA View Post
One nice thing about the 21st century's unimaginable levels of metropolitan gentrification is that it's gotten so out of hand that many smaller cities and towns, forgotten in past decades, are quietly beginning to come back to life as people working in fields without the amazing salaries that mwj119 takes for granted as a millennial birthright for happening to have the right professional proclivities, move to farther-out places that a "civilized" middle class Massahole didn't have to consider back a couple decades when houses in Cambridge cost $150k, and undertake interesting business and cultural ventures. In Mass - smaller places like Lowell, New Bedford, Easthampton, Greenfield, Gloucester, Plymouth, Hudson, Maynard, and even Worcester come to mind as experiencing some socioeconomic boost and arts and cultural renewal without being gentrified quite yet as they fill up with wayward $40-$60k salary scumrats. As mwj points out, Malden and Chelsea soon to follow the Somerville pattern too.
I'm confused. I make a good salary? I like tech?

Man, feels like we're getting to really know each other. Funny though, as I haven't told you a single thing about myself. I merely pointed out that millennials can and will continue to live and work in and around Boston as we trend upward and onward. The OP can't get his utopia- nice town, good schools, mature and thin tree lined streets, neighborly, no chain resatatunts, etc.- close to Boston for that price point. Everyone in the country wants that. And renters, as a result of this 21st century metropolitan gentrification, need to look elsewhere to cities and neighborhoods that are not yet infiltrated. Hence the expansion into the towns and cities you described.

What do I have to do with that narrative? I'd love to buy a place in Cambridge or Winchester, but I can't afford it. So a town like Stoneham will suffice. I'm perfectly fine with Stoneham, or Hopkinton. It's the posters on here that are not ok with the Stonehams that seem to be struggling.

Anyways, the idea that only 50 year olds or folks that bought a place decade back can live in Boston is nonsense. Plenty of entry level workers living in Dorchester, Allston, JP. Just because we can't live in a Back Bay brownstone doesn't mean the entire city is off limits. Same thing with Winchester vs. Hopkinton.
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Old 12-28-2017, 10:55 PM
 
27 posts, read 29,385 times
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[quote=West-Bost-West;50531266]
From here, after all this and reading other forums and Redfin, Haddonfield looks pretty good. Maybe Morristown, Ardmore, Tarrytown, Armonk, or Media. Ridgefield would be nice. Hell, even Stamford has a Thanksgiving Day parade![/

Having just moved to Needham from Tarrytown this summer I can assure you that Needham is much more affordable comparing almost apples to apples housing. I say almost because the schools don't really compare (favorable to Needham). The home prices will look similar but the taxes are at least 1/3 lower in Needham and the single family homes in NY generally need a lot more work. You will likely pay north of $18,000 on a $600k SFH (especially after the Greenburgh reassessment last year) and the overall COL is higher in NY e.g. commuting, heat/electric bills again 1/3 to 1/2 higher than Needham, the list goes on...

That said, Tarrytown was awesome and we really miss it. But so far we enjoy Needham, it reminds us of many parts of Westchester with walkable train stations, mom and pop shops, sidewalk lined neighborhoods, and family friendly community events/activities. Plus you can almost always find parking and it doesn't cost a fortune.

Morristown, Armonk, and Ridgefield will be comparable in cost to the area that I think people refer to as Metro-West, with Ridgefield being less pricey due to lower CT taxes and super long and indirect commute to NYC. Armonk is also pretty rural, relative to lower Westchester. NY metro is definitely not going to get you what I think you want for $600k, unless you are willing to consider Putnam or Rockland Counties, or South Jersey.
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Old 12-29-2017, 06:03 AM
 
5,554 posts, read 3,119,503 times
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Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
As for the Stamford parade comment.. huh? Are you insinuating towns in MA don't have parades? You'll be happy to know both of my reccomendstions, Andover and Concord, have xmas parades and tree lighting events. Both have nice farmers markets, town runs, etc.
Here in Burlington, we have an Independence Day parade, fireworks during Celebrate Burlington Day, Tree Lighting on the Common with fireworks, Memorial and Veterans Day ceremonies supported by the high school band, Scouts, town and private organizations. Quite a few 5K's, a weekly farmer's market, lots of rec department activities including weekly concerts and movies on the common.

Yeah we don't have a walkable downtown and the retail is a bit intense, but those businesses step up when needed. How many places can call one business and get a high four figure donation to pay for the marching band to go see the Cirque de Soleil performance that inspired their halftime show? When you get across 3A it's a suburban town with lots of great people and things to do with quite a few local restaurants and businesses.
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Old 12-29-2017, 06:10 AM
 
2,190 posts, read 1,058,449 times
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Originally Posted by SalamanderSmile View Post
I totally get where you are coming from. I am from Ohio and married into a Boston townie family and it is like nothing even exists south of the cape or west of Northampton. Literally every year of DHs life the only place they went was the cape. His mother went to Florida for the first time at 70.
.
Do you think you guys may just know terrible people? I know plenty of people from here that travel well, are articulate, smile, like or love their lives.
Maybe its not a new location you should be seeking, but a new herd to run with?
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Old 12-29-2017, 06:54 AM
 
755 posts, read 974,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
The OP can't get his utopia- nice town, good schools, mature and thin tree lined streets, neighborly, no chain resatatunts, etc.- close to Boston for that price point. Everyone in the country wants that. And renters, as a result of this 21st century metropolitan gentrification, need to look elsewhere to cities and neighborhoods that are not yet infiltrated. Hence the expansion into the towns and cities you described.
Exactly. The OP is no different in that respect than others who've posted here wondering the same thing. The difference is attitude, and the OP's is glaring.

I'll throw in my $.02: We have friends who moved up here after losing a house during the downturn and gaining a job in a particular field after 1+ year's of looking. They did no homework whatsoever before moving here. I reckon if they had, they would've turned down that job and somehow made it work where they were. They didn't particularly like where they were, but the COL was in their *comfortable* ballpark. In the 3-4 years since they've been here they've had to move 2-3 times, each time further out from the metro Boston area, simply because they cannot afford the median rent. Right now they're living outside the Twin Cities area. The job situation right now is tenuous. What happens if something happens with that job? What happens if they have to move again?

Quote:
Anyways, the idea that only 50 year olds or folks that bought a place decade back can live in Boston is nonsense. Plenty of entry level workers living in Dorchester, Allston, JP. Just because we can't live in a Back Bay brownstone doesn't mean the entire city is off limits. Same thing with Winchester vs. Hopkinton.
One thing which hasn't been mentioned in this thread is how real estate is very much an inheritable thing around here, especially in the metro area. In my neighborhood alone, I'd say over half of us inherited our houses. We never could afford to stay here and raise our families otherwise.
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Old 12-29-2017, 07:16 AM
 
Location: East Coast
3,857 posts, read 2,406,529 times
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[quote=J1NL1;50532039]
Quote:
Originally Posted by West-Bost-West View Post
From here, after all this and reading other forums and Redfin, Haddonfield looks pretty good. Maybe Morristown, Ardmore, Tarrytown, Armonk, or Media. Ridgefield would be nice. Hell, even Stamford has a Thanksgiving Day parade![/

Having just moved to Needham from Tarrytown this summer I can assure you that Needham is much more affordable comparing almost apples to apples housing. I say almost because the schools don't really compare (favorable to Needham). The home prices will look similar but the taxes are at least 1/3 lower in Needham and the single family homes in NY generally need a lot more work. You will likely pay north of $18,000 on a $600k SFH (especially after the Greenburgh reassessment last year) and the overall COL is higher in NY e.g. commuting, heat/electric bills again 1/3 to 1/2 higher than Needham, the list goes on...

That said, Tarrytown was awesome and we really miss it. But so far we enjoy Needham, it reminds us of many parts of Westchester with walkable train stations, mom and pop shops, sidewalk lined neighborhoods, and family friendly community events/activities. Plus you can almost always find parking and it doesn't cost a fortune.

Morristown, Armonk, and Ridgefield will be comparable in cost to the area that I think people refer to as Metro-West, with Ridgefield being less pricey due to lower CT taxes and super long and indirect commute to NYC. Armonk is also pretty rural, relative to lower Westchester. NY metro is definitely not going to get you what I think you want for $600k, unless you are willing to consider Putnam or Rockland Counties, or South Jersey.
This is a key point -- real estate taxes in both NY and NJ are higher than they are here. I don't see how OP will get what he wants in the NYC suburbs. But the Philly suburbs he's looking at may be what he wants. Haddonfield, which he mentioned as a top choice is a good place to look at. The Philadelphia metro area is the best bargain in the northeast.
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Old 12-29-2017, 07:25 AM
 
27 posts, read 29,385 times
Reputation: 46
[quote=chicagoliz;50533599]
Quote:
Originally Posted by J1NL1 View Post

This is a key point -- real estate taxes in both NY and NJ are higher than they are here. I don't see how OP will get what he wants in the NYC suburbs. But the Philly suburbs he's looking at may be what he wants. Haddonfield, which he mentioned as a top choice is a good place to look at. The Philadelphia metro area is the best bargain in the northeast.
Totally agree about Philly suburbs being a relatively good value for the Northeast. Also wanted to add to my comment that Stamford/Fairfield County home prices are higher to compensate for the lower property taxes. So it comes out to about the same in the end. The only marginally better values are to be had if you find a town away from a train line, greater than 90 min commute to NYC, or in a less desirable school district.
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