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Old 10-22-2018, 09:28 AM
 
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Ayer.

Home prices and income are up, but a town with a commuter rail station which is sandwiched between moneyed 'old guards' Groton, Harvard, and Littleton should be doing a lot better. Even with the improvements and investments made at Deven's, the town still feels like a transient military backwater.

There's been some minor improvements such as Union Coffee, but it appears to be stagnating when compared to more savvy revitalizations like Hudson.
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Old 10-22-2018, 10:33 AM
 
18,236 posts, read 10,279,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrewsburried View Post
I wouldn't be surprised if Worcester supersedes Providence as the second-tier darling in greater Boston over the next decade+. I love Providence, but the city's fiscal/credit standing is dismal and much of it's 'renaissance' came via public investment, where as Worcester has maintained a better mix of public and private investment. Additionally, Worcester is not dogged by an under performing job market.

Providence has an Ivy, is a state capital, and sits on the Northeast Corridor. It has a large-ish regional airport with service to all the east coast hubs, the two Chicago hubs, and all the Florida leisure nonstops. I don't think Worcester gets to #2 despite the chronic Rhode Island problems.


I don't see how a city with only 29.4% of the workforce with a college education ever becomes significant without an enormous pile of public investment that isn't going to happen since the money has to be spread out among a pretty long list of struggling mill cities. You don't have the skill in the local workforce for employers to want to locate high paying there and that education level puts a huge drag brake on the public school system. The high wage jobs remain on the 495 belt.
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Old 10-22-2018, 11:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Well, just about any former mill town. I wouldn't even know where to begin, maybe with Ware. Neighboring Palmer is not as bad, but still mostly a ghost town. Palmer will be getting a water park so finally, FINALLY, they have some hope for jobs and some sort of activity besides a few run down bars.

Both of these towns were adversely affected by the construction of the Quabbin Reservoir, Ware especially. It was cut off from its own county seat of Northampton by the gigantic reservoir that was previously just a river. At least it still had factories, but then those died off. The location is isolated. Too far west of Worcester, too far from anything. But if Palmer makes a comeback, next door neighbor Ware could ride in on its coat tails.

The running joke, "Where's Ware?" may no longer apply if it gets back on the map. But as it now stands, it's the number one drug hellhole in the state, median house or condo value is $171,766 and median gross rent is only $761.

http://www.city-data.com/city/Ware-Massachusetts.html

Main Street in Northampton and Main Street and Ware are both route 9. On a map downtown Ware is south of The Quabbin. Those factories were going to close anyway.
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Old 10-22-2018, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
10,062 posts, read 10,574,750 times
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What prompted me to ask my question about Massachusetts was this column:
https://www.creators.com/read/marc-d...for-fall-river

Chef Emeril Lagasse is a Fall River native. He became famous working in New Orleans, preparing Creole/Cajun cuisine. I think some people assumed he was a native of New Orleans because of his name and accent. But he is of French Canadian-Portuguese descent. Is Portuguese a common language in Fall River?
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Old 10-22-2018, 12:11 PM
 
Location: East Boston, MA
9,617 posts, read 17,611,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
What prompted me to ask my question about Massachusetts was this column:
https://www.creators.com/read/marc-d...for-fall-river

Chef Emeril Lagasse is a Fall River native. He became famous working in New Orleans, preparing Creole/Cajun cuisine. I think some people assumed he was a native of New Orleans because of his name and accent. But he is of French Canadian-Portuguese descent. Is Portuguese a common language in Fall River?
Fall River is a rough spot. And it's not far off from a number of other similar towns, larger (Springfield), or smaller (Ware, Fitchburg, Holyoke, etc.). Boston and its suburbs make up a disproportionate amount of Massachusetts which is a tiny state physically speaking. So it's easy to see that the view of Massachusetts from outside of the region is that it's this hyper-educated, preppy, wealthy region. Make no mistake about it, lots of Massachusetts is like that (again, largely around Boston). But there's a lot of the state that bares a striking resemblance to the Rust Belt. Old industrial and mill towns that have seen the blue collar trades disappear and nothing has taken their place. Bourdain, before he passed, did a good episode of Parts Unknown that gives you an idea of what the non-Boston side of Massachusetts. Poverty, unemployment, urban decay, drug and alcohol abuse... it's all here.

Marc Dion is an oddball (writes for the Fall River Herald and Fall River Reporter too), and tends to go off the rails a bit. But he's not far off the mark here. Fall River is forgotten. I grew up in the area, and while it's not too far away (an hour with no traffic), it looks and feels like a different world from Boston. People up here don't really acknowledge its existence other than the odd news coverage (usually related to overdoses, Lizzie Borden, or now, the Mayor's arrest). It's not hard for people in the Boston area to forget about the Fall Rivers (or Springfields, Holyokes, Lawrences, or Brocktons) of the world since there is such a chasm between the two areas, even though they're not far from each other.

Portuguese is fairly common in Fall River, though Spanish is poised (or already has) overtaken it. I grew up in the Fall River area. I have very close friends who still list Portuguese as their primary language. A lot of of my friends have parents that speak no other language.
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Old 10-22-2018, 12:16 PM
 
798 posts, read 688,543 times
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Absolutely not. Each and every municipality in our great state is at the very forefront of economic development.
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Old 10-22-2018, 01:21 PM
 
1,643 posts, read 1,014,127 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Fall River is a rough spot. And it's not far off from a number of other similar towns, larger (Springfield), or smaller (Ware, Fitchburg, Holyoke, etc.). Boston and its suburbs make up a disproportionate amount of Massachusetts which is a tiny state physically speaking. So it's easy to see that the view of Massachusetts from outside of the region is that it's this hyper-educated, preppy, wealthy region. Make no mistake about it, lots of Massachusetts is like that (again, largely around Boston). But there's a lot of the state that bares a striking resemblance to the Rust Belt. Old industrial and mill towns that have seen the blue collar trades disappear and nothing has taken their place. Bourdain, before he passed, did a good episode of Parts Unknown that gives you an idea of what the non-Boston side of Massachusetts. Poverty, unemployment, urban decay, drug and alcohol abuse... it's all here.

Marc Dion is an oddball (writes for the Fall River Herald and Fall River Reporter too), and tends to go off the rails a bit. But he's not far off the mark here. Fall River is forgotten. I grew up in the area, and while it's not too far away (an hour with no traffic), it looks and feels like a different world from Boston. People up here don't really acknowledge its existence other than the odd news coverage (usually related to overdoses, Lizzie Borden, or now, the Mayor's arrest). It's not hard for people in the Boston area to forget about the Fall Rivers (or Springfields, Holyokes, Lawrences, or Brocktons) of the world since there is such a chasm between the two areas, even though they're not far from each other.

Portuguese is fairly common in Fall River, though Spanish is poised (or already has) overtaken it. I grew up in the Fall River area. I have very close friends who still list Portuguese as their primary language. A lot of of my friends have parents that speak no other language.

Yes I usually walk from Fall River to Springfield.
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Old 10-22-2018, 02:01 PM
 
Location: East Boston, MA
9,617 posts, read 17,611,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_General View Post
Yes I usually walk from Fall River to Springfield.
Thanks. I meant it's "not far off" in terms of lagging economically.
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Old 10-22-2018, 02:18 PM
 
2,164 posts, read 3,872,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Fall River is a rough spot. And it's not far off from a number of other similar towns, larger (Springfield), or smaller (Ware, Fitchburg, Holyoke, etc.). Boston and its suburbs make up a disproportionate amount of Massachusetts which is a tiny state physically speaking. So it's easy to see that the view of Massachusetts from outside of the region is that it's this hyper-educated, preppy, wealthy region.
I thought Connecticut was the NE state people think of as preppy and WASPy and Massachusetts rather as full of people who hold up banks and drive like Eddie Coyle.
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Old 10-22-2018, 02:38 PM
 
5,627 posts, read 6,024,028 times
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Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
How about Worcester?
There are many other towns that have fallen more behind that Worcester. Relative to those, it is not doing bad at all.
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