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Old 11-03-2018, 01:39 PM
 
13,510 posts, read 11,165,411 times
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Watch the video below. Apparently problematic aggregate was used in the concrete in the foundations of tens of thousands of houses in MA and CT. After about twenty years, moisture starts to bread down the aggregate and the concrete crumbles.

Now if this has been used in houses, where else has it been used. Skyscrapers in Boston? The Big Dig bridges and tunnels? Who knows.

https://youtu.be/vAcGmB-VYtE
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Old 11-03-2018, 02:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
Watch the video below. Apparently problematic aggregate was used in the concrete in the foundations of tens of thousands of houses in MA and CT. After about twenty years, moisture starts to bread down the aggregate and the concrete crumbles.

Now if this has been used in houses, where else has it been used. Skyscrapers in Boston? The Big Dig bridges and tunnels? Who knows.

https://youtu.be/vAcGmB-VYtE

I believe much of this issue is restricted to a few concrete companies. Seems to have been much more prevalent in CT.

There has been an active multi year thread on the CT forum on this matter:
Crumbling Foundations
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Old 11-03-2018, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts & Hilton Head, SC
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This has been known for a few years. I think it is confined to Western Ma.
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Old 11-03-2018, 03:39 PM
 
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Yeah, its the presence of pyrrhotite that will cause this kind of deterioration. Connecticut and Massachusetts governments are both aware of this issue and have passed relief bills accordingly. I don't think this was an issue for the Big Dig, but a company, Aggregate Industries, was indicted in a criminal court (and ordered to pay near $50 mil in compensation) for providing inferior/faulty concrete, so stay tuned on how that is eventually handled.

CT Relief bill:
https://ctmirror.org/2018/05/05/ct-h...g-foundations/
MA Relief bill:
https://www.masslive.com/business-ne...omeowners.html
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Old 11-05-2018, 10:59 AM
 
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From what I understand CT estimates about 35,000 homes. In Mass it is about 10,000 but as mentioned it is mostly western Mass.

Without naming names I brought this up with someone with some significant influence in the region..Mass isn't doing anything yet.

This is almost like a building version of a STD as weird as that sounds. You have to test first to determine the extent. After testing then there's the claims.

Some of the problems though is some don't want to admit to this and as a result they rather watch things fall apart. Local governments are scared because you cannot tax these buildings as homes. It's one thing to not add to housing inventory but it's another to lose these. On the CT side alone this could cost easily billions. 35,000 homes at a fix of 75,0000 is more than 2 billion right there. Now if you are talking 100K or more to fix we're talking 3.5 billion. I don't think the bailout is coming. CT can kinda help a bit but this is going to take over a decade. Even if your house is ok if your neighbors isn't that can cause your house to drop. Banks will walk away from refinancing as equity is nil. No bank will lend if testing isn't performed first.

That's why I say ultimately this going to make housing increase in Springfield and Hartford. If a house is in the surrounding suburbs and isn't publicly saying they have been tested buyers will be reluctant. But you do know that in other areas with more historical districts that the construction was before this concrete was used. There's housing stock in both cities that were made generations beforehand.

35,000 homes in CT, 10,000 in Mass that's 45,000. Assume at least a family of three per home now 135,000 people looking for a place to live. It's not like there's a huge amount of new housing development (either side) to counteract this. But again they are empty lots waiting to be developed in both cities and a fair amount of new development to begin with. It wouldn't surprise me if in another 10 to 20 years we see tens of thousands of more people living in both cities and areas between.
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