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Old 08-14-2019, 09:48 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
That is white though. Certainly not Latino.

Mixed, generally. Particularly in the eastern islands. Most of the South Coast immigrants come from Sao Miguel. Madeira is even more mixed race. Brazilian also gets omitted from the Hispanic category by the US Census.
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Old 08-14-2019, 09:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Cross what?

Asians > Blacks in Avon. I'd guess that will be in the 2030 census.
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Old 08-14-2019, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
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Maybe. I dont think so though. Avon pretty ugly and cheap. I think the median HH income represents a dad making 50 k and a mom making 30k. With little in the way of assets. Asians never surpassed blacks in Randolph, so I dont really see it happening in Avon, because i get the vibe Avon is more of an extension of Brockton than Randolph. And Brockton has a negligible Asian population. Maybe in a town that borders Quincy or is nearer to Quincy like Braintree/Weymouth or a more expensive town similar to Sharon.

Asians will grow faster than black as a population no doubt but I think it will be concentrated in MetroWest. Blacks will be growing faster in MA than nationwide due to increasing immigration from Africa and the Carribbean so it wont be that easy to surpass a black population in an area of blacker than average towns.
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Old 08-14-2019, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
6,410 posts, read 2,721,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Mixed, generally. Particularly in the eastern islands. Most of the South Coast immigrants come from Sao Miguel. Madeira is even more mixed race. Brazilian also gets omitted from the Hispanic category by the US Census.
Oh cool. I know nothing about the Azores.

Brazilians are Latino but not Hispanic and the Census categories are self identifiable. So if a Brazilian identifies as Latino -then they are. Many Brazilians select "White Hispanic". I dont believe white Hispanic will be an option on the 2020 census though-due to equity issue (why cant people identify as Black Hispanic? You get the idea). I think many Brazilians and some Portuguese select 'Other'. But Mainland Portuguese is undoubtedly white just like Italians Spaniards and Greeks.

"According to the Smithsonian Institution, the term "Latino" includes peoples with Portuguese roots, such as Brazilians, as well as those of Spanish-language origin. In the United States, many Hispanics and Latinos are of both European and Native American ancestry (mestizo)."
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Old 08-14-2019, 12:23 PM
 
3,320 posts, read 2,574,933 times
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Got some new interesting stats!

x% of white people in Greater Boston live in a town or city that is

25.8% ................ >90% white.
50.9% ................ >80% white.
73.8% ................ >70% white.
82.4% ................ >60% white.
85.6% ................ >50% white.


x% of black people in Greater Boston live in a town or city that is

7.9% .................. >40% black.
10.6% ................ >30% black.
45.6% ................ >20% black.
68.1% ................ >10% black.
87.8% ................ >5% black.


x% of Latino people in Greater Boston live in a town or city that is

13.7% ................ >50% Latino.
23.7% ................ >40% Latino.
30.7% ................ >30% Latino.
50.3% ................ >20% Latino.
80.4% ................ >10% Latino.
91.0% ................ >5% Latino.


x% of Latino people in Greater Boston live in a town or city that is

8.5% ................... >25% Asian.
20.1% ................. >20% Asian.
31.8% ................. >15% Asian.
44.9% ................. >10% Asian.
86.3% ................. >5% Asian.
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Old 08-14-2019, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Dripping Springs, Texas
153 posts, read 45,033 times
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I don't see an honorable purpose for this kind of head counting. As an exercise, I'd be interested in knowing, for example, in a particular town how many of the minority families that are there are multi-generational property owners or how many are newcomers.

Take a town like Wendell where there is one black family and the patriarch was the Chief of the Fire Department and there's a town pond named after them, as compared to the next town over, New Salem, which had one black family who only lasted a year before they escaped.

When there are multi-generational minority homeowners in a town such as Oak Bluffs, Hingham, or Wendell it tells you something different and more important than a simple headcount. I'm uncomfortable with a bunch of (mostly) white people counting minority faces and what purpose that serves historically in real estate decisions.
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Old 08-14-2019, 03:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RBThescot View Post
I don't see an honorable purpose for this kind of head counting. As an exercise, I'd be interested in knowing, for example, in a particular town how many of the minority families that are there are multi-generational property owners or how many are newcomers.

Take a town like Wendell where there is one black family and the patriarch was the Chief of the Fire Department and there's a town pond named after them, as compared to the next town over, New Salem, which had one black family who only lasted a year before they escaped.

When there are multi-generational minority homeowners in a town such as Oak Bluffs, Hingham, or Wendell it tells you something different and more important than a simple headcount. I'm uncomfortable with a bunch of (mostly) white people counting minority faces and what purpose that serves historically in real estate decisions.
No problem RBT, when the town is 100% free of whites it will be acceptably diverse.

Last edited by ben young; 08-14-2019 at 03:49 PM..
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Old 08-14-2019, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
6,410 posts, read 2,721,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RBThescot View Post
I don't see an honorable purpose for this kind of head counting. As an exercise, I'd be interested in knowing, for example, in a particular town how many of the minority families that are there are multi-generational property owners or how many are newcomers.

Take a town like Wendell where there is one black family and the patriarch was the Chief of the Fire Department and there's a town pond named after them, as compared to the next town over, New Salem, which had one black family who only lasted a year before they escaped.

When there are multi-generational minority homeowners in a town such as Oak Bluffs, Hingham, or Wendell it tells you something different and more important than a simple headcount. I'm uncomfortable with a bunch of (mostly) white people counting minority faces and what purpose that serves historically in real estate decisions.
So I take it you’re uncomfortable with the Census too? Why do you have any more interest in multi generational homeowners? Seems kind of random. This shows settlement patterns, and can help give us a sense of regional differences within the state. It’s also useful for businesses, non-profits, folks looking to move to racially diverse areas, and advertisers. That’s why this data is collected in the first place. When you’re white you really don’t have to take these things into consideration as you move around-it’s with different for the rest of us.

It’s interesting information and raises question and were on city DATA forum.
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Old 08-14-2019, 08:41 PM
 
3,320 posts, read 2,574,933 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ben young View Post
No problem RBT, when the town is 100% free of whites it will be acceptably diverse.
Troll.

I’d report this post, but I don’t know if it’s heinous enough to get you banned from the site.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RBThescot View Post
I don't see an honorable purpose for this kind of head counting. As an exercise, I'd be interested in knowing, for example, in a particular town how many of the minority families that are there are multi-generational property owners or how many are newcomers.
That’s a good point, and an interesting piece of data that I’d love to try and track. The problem is: I don’t know where I’d go to look for it. A simple “headcount” is easy to do via data provided by the census, and it’s still pretty informative in metro Boston despite lacking nuance in Wendell or New Salem (neither of which were included in my definition of “Greater Boston”).

Last edited by Boston Shudra; 08-14-2019 at 10:02 PM..
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Old 08-15-2019, 08:10 AM
 
286 posts, read 357,486 times
Reputation: 440
I see what you've done here.

Very nice job with all of the data and charts.

You have posted demographic data without commentary or opinion and leave it up to others
to try to interpret what that means. It is interesting to read the comments and see
various interpretations about what it means.

One might consider race as a proxy for socio-economic status.
One might also consider race as a proxy for immigration.

I will add another point. I'm curious about how economic mobility as attained
through various means (college attainment, business, inheritance, etc.) might
factor into such statistics over time for this sort of data depicted in, 5 or 10 year increments.

It is interesting that some of those same towns, some 40 years ago weren't the expensive
"high cost entry point" communities they are today. I remember back in college, my
roommate's family had a small cottage on the cape. His family had been in the US
for 3 generations from Armenia where his grandparents emigrated to the US. They
were by no means wealthy rather solidly middle class and lived in Weymouth.
My housemate's father bought the cottage in the early 80's. That was very possible back then
versus now.

Another factor concerns the inter-generational transfer of wealth. When it works, families
that have been in the US for multiple generations have an opportunity to transfer wealth
(assets, property, etc.) to the next generation. This means that the asset has opportunity
to appreciate (or compound) over multiple lifetimes. A family doesn't have to be super
wealthy, rather something such as someone inheriting a house or getting help with
downpayment on a house can give relatively young person (i.e. next generation) a great
head start.

Mind you, when I talk about intergenerational transfer of wealth, I'm not saying it is
a good thing or a bad thing, but merely a thing.
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