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Old 12-26-2008, 10:56 PM
 
4,246 posts, read 8,763,787 times
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I am inspired to post this due to another thread. I think people who would suggest not to get too involved with someone with mental illness (or as I prefer - mental health issues) simply propagate this stigma and prejudice, which just causes more suffering to those who have already been dealt a "challenge" in the first place. Let's see a list of people who had or have bipolar disorder:

Buzz Aldrin, astronaut
Lionel Aldridge
Hans Christian Andersen, writer
Ned Beatty, actor
Robert Boorstin, writer, assistant to Pres. Clinton,
Arthur Benson, writer
E F Benson, writer
William Blake (1757-1827), poet
Ralph Blakelock, artist
Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), general
Tadeusz Borowski
Art Buchwald, writer, humorist
Tim Burton, artist, movie director
Robert Campeau, financier (Canada)
Drew Carey, actor
Jim Carrey, actor
Dick Cavett, writer, media personality
C.E. Chaffin, writer, poet
Agatha Christie, mystery writer
Winston Churchill, 1874-1965- British Prm Mnstr
John Clare, poet
Rosemary Clooney, singer
Garnet Coleman, legislator (Texas)
Francis Ford Coppola, director
Patricia Cornwell, writer
Richard Dadd
John Daly, athlete (golf)
John Davidson, poet
Edward Dayes, artist
Ray Davies, musician
Emily Dickinson
Kitty Dukakis, former First Lady of Massachusetts
Patty Duke (Anna Duke Pearce), actor, writer
Thomas Eagleton, lawyer, former U.S. Senator
T S Eliot, poet
Ralph Waldo Emerson, essayist
Robert Evans, film producer
Carrie Fisher, writer, actor
Edward FitzGerald
Robert Frost
F Scott Fitzgerald, author
Larry Flynt, magazine publisher
Connie Francis, actor, musician
Sigmund Freud, physician
Cary Grant, actor
Kaye Gibbons, writer
Shecky Greene, comedian, actor
Linda Hamilton, actor
Kristin Hersh, musician
Victor Hugo, poet
Jack London, author
Robert Lowell, poet
Marilyn Monroe, actress
Mozart, composer
Jay Marvin, radio personality, writer
Cara Kahn, mtv's 'real world'
Kevin McDonald, comedian, actor
Kristy McNichol, actor
Dimitri Mihalas, scientist
Kate Millett, writer, artist
Spike Milligan, comic actor, writer
John Mulheren, financier (U.S.)
Robert Munsch, writer
Napoleon, general
Ilie Nastase, athlete (tennis), politician
Isaac Newton, scientist
Margo Orum, writer
Nicola Pagett, actor
J C Penney
Plato, philosopher, according to Aristotle
Edgar Allen Poe, author
Jimmie Piersall, athlete, sports announcer
Charley Pride, musician
Mac Rebennack (Dr. John), musician
Jeannie C. Riley, musician
Phil Graham, owner, Washington Post
Graham Greene, writer
Peter Gregg, team owner and manager, race car driver
Abbie Hoffman, writer, political activist
Lynn Rivers, U.S. Congress
Francesco Scavullo, artist, photographer
Lori Schiller, writer, educator
Frances Sherwood, writer
Scott Simmie, writer, journalist
Alonzo Spellman, athlete (football)
Muffin Spencer-Devlin, athlete (pro golf)
Gordon Sumner (Sting), musician, composer
St Francis
St John
St Theresa
Rod Steiger, film maker
Robert Louis Stevenson
Liz Taylor, actor
J.M.W. Turner
Mark Twain, author
Alfred, Lord Tennyson, poet
Ted Turner, entrepreneur, media giant
Jean-Claude Van Damme, athlete, actor
Vincent van Gogh
Mark Vonnegut, doctor, writer
Sol Wachtler, judge, writer
Tom Waits, musician, composer
Walt Whitman, poet
Tennessee Williams, author
Brian Wilson, musician (Beach Boys), composer, arranger
Jonathan Winters, comedian, actor, writer, artist
Luther Wright, athlete (basketball)
Margot Kidder, actor
Robert E Lee, soldier
Bill Liechtenstein, producer (TV & radio)
Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), US President
Daniel Johnston, musician
Samuel Johnson, poet
Burgess Meredith, 1908-1997, actor, director
Kay Redfield Jamison, psychologist, writer
**************************
Wow, I am in good company. Pretty impressive list.

My point is that until people stop thinking that those with mental illness are crazy or to be avoided, things are not going to improve for those with mental illness, as they could, were people more accepting of the condition. It's tough to be in the closet, especially since this condition is not what someone would "choose."

I address bipolar in this thread as it seems to be the latest Dx and one that gets a bum rap. Plus, I've been diagnosed with it myself (bipolar depressive). And I am not crazy although things might be more difficult for me than for someone who does not have this "issue."
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Old 12-27-2008, 12:23 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,657 posts, read 6,702,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by movin'on View Post
I address bipolar in this thread as it seems to be the latest Dx and one that gets a bum rap. Plus, I've been diagnosed with it myself (bipolar depressive). And I am not crazy although things might be more difficult for me than for someone who does not have this "issue."
You've done the best thing in being diagnosed and seeking treatment; I wish you the best in stabilizing your illness.

That list is impressive: people who dealt with this illness and achieved greatness, but that isn't really the point of the other post. I don't know what was behind the OP's POV in making the assertion, but it did raise the question of choices people make. Some of the answers people gave were from prejudice, others (like mine) are based on real experience. Absolutely, there are people - like those listed, and most likely yourself - who will be able to stabilize their problems, make good productive lives for themselves, and become excellent prospects for mates or companions - which is what the other thread is about. As another poster pointed out, one could be working alongside someone who is mentally ill, or be best friends with someone like that, and never know it. But we are talking about the choice to make the most intimate and closely-bonded relationship with someone. And if someone has reservations about doing that because of something like mental illness, then that's their choice and is more a reflection of, perhaps, past (and present, in my case) experiences. It's not going to be about an encompassing prejudice against that group of people as a whole, rather about the kind of relationship they choose to have with one particular person who is afflicted.

Now, I'm currently dealing with my bi-polar mother who is having one of her "bad spells" (her own choice. I confirmed with my sister that she's off her meds again) who has done her best to totally crap out my Christmas. She's also doing her damnedest to ruin my sister's joy in finally getting her heart's desire: her first granddaughter, born the day before Christmas. Our spouses are running interference - deleting messages off the phone and opening mail from her and reading it before it gets to us. People in our network of family and friends have said "you really ought to just cut her off". Well, yeah, easy for them to say and something that would make our lives a hell of a lot easier. But, we know that our mother didn't ask for this hell - though she could make it easier for herself if she wanted - and there are times when she needs us and we can't help but want to be there for her, like the bout of cancer she went through last year. And we know she isn't a bad person; in her rational periods (when she takes her meds) she wouldn't be acting the way she is right now. But we sure didn't sign up for this kind of life. If there is a G*d, I really don't appreciate that I got stuck with this family. Which makes me believe that, given the choice, I'm not up for risking a do-over.

As someone diagnosed with BPD you are going to deal with revealing this to prospective companions. I'll bet the odds are that it won't matter to most if you emphasize that it is being treated and point out the number of esteemed folks who've dealt with it. There aren't really a large number of people who've had to deal with it in the horrific manner of some of us. But if you do run across the shy number who hear what you have to say and then turn you down - hopefully explaining why - just keep in mind that some of us just don't want to go down that road. Being friends with a mentally ill person - so what; working with them - no big deal. Married to one? Well, they might want to sit down and really think that over.

Last edited by silverwing; 12-27-2008 at 12:36 AM..
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Old 12-27-2008, 12:29 AM
 
Location: southern california
53,432 posts, read 68,420,451 times
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your point is well put, however-- i would not include people in the list that did not have the benefit and accuracy of modern medicine for the diagnosis.
also bipolars do not always like to take their meds,
this can create major problems of health and safety issues for them and loved ones.
this can be managed but dangerous to ignore.
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Old 12-27-2008, 03:50 AM
 
4,246 posts, read 8,763,787 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
your point is well put, however-- i would not include people in the list that did not have the benefit and accuracy of modern medicine for the diagnosis.
also bipolars do not always like to take their meds,
this can create major problems of health and safety issues for them and loved ones.
this can be managed but dangerous to ignore.
Your points are well taken, but I think you might be overreacting just a bit. Can you share a personal experience with me where someone with BPD was a safety issue to someone else?
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Old 12-27-2008, 04:01 AM
 
4,246 posts, read 8,763,787 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverwing View Post
You've done the best thing in being diagnosed and seeking treatment; I wish you the best in stabilizing your illness.

That list is impressive: people who dealt with this illness and achieved greatness, but that isn't really the point of the other post. I don't know what was behind the OP's POV in making the assertion, but it did raise the question of choices people make. Some of the answers people gave were from prejudice, others (like mine) are based on real experience. Absolutely, there are people - like those listed, and most likely yourself - who will be able to stabilize their problems, make good productive lives for themselves, and become excellent prospects for mates or companions - which is what the other thread is about. As another poster pointed out, one could be working alongside someone who is mentally ill, or be best friends with someone like that, and never know it. But we are talking about the choice to make the most intimate and closely-bonded relationship with someone. And if someone has reservations about doing that because of something like mental illness, then that's their choice and is more a reflection of, perhaps, past (and present, in my case) experiences. It's not going to be about an encompassing prejudice against that group of people as a whole, rather about the kind of relationship they choose to have with one particular person who is afflicted.

Now, I'm currently dealing with my bi-polar mother who is having one of her "bad spells" (her own choice. I confirmed with my sister that she's off her meds again) who has done her best to totally crap out my Christmas. She's also doing her damnedest to ruin my sister's joy in finally getting her heart's desire: her first granddaughter, born the day before Christmas. Our spouses are running interference - deleting messages off the phone and opening mail from her and reading it before it gets to us. People in our network of family and friends have said "you really ought to just cut her off". Well, yeah, easy for them to say and something that would make our lives a hell of a lot easier. But, we know that our mother didn't ask for this hell - though she could make it easier for herself if she wanted - and there are times when she needs us and we can't help but want to be there for her, like the bout of cancer she went through last year. And we know she isn't a bad person; in her rational periods (when she takes her meds) she wouldn't be acting the way she is right now. But we sure didn't sign up for this kind of life. If there is a G*d, I really don't appreciate that I got stuck with this family. Which makes me believe that, given the choice, I'm not up for risking a do-over.

As someone diagnosed with BPD you are going to deal with revealing this to prospective companions. I'll bet the odds are that it won't matter to most if you emphasize that it is being treated and point out the number of esteemed folks who've dealt with it. There aren't really a large number of people who've had to deal with it in the horrific manner of some of us. But if you do run across the shy number who hear what you have to say and then turn you down - hopefully explaining why - just keep in mind that some of us just don't want to go down that road. Being friends with a mentally ill person - so what; working with them - no big deal. Married to one? Well, they might want to sit down and really think that over.
I can appreciate a lot of what you say, but I think far too often there are a lot of assumptions made based on evidence not in fact. The poster in the other thread referred to someone with BPD just up and disappearing. Wow, for all the men in my life who have done that - and presumably they did not have BPD.

When I was involved with an abuser (one who works in mental health - no less and is presumably just fine), everything was blamed on my condition. The abuser never took responsibility for anything he did or said - I was always having a BP moment. I guess that's why his repeated assertions that I was an "idiot" were made. This is a guy that would seem to be "normal" who acted this way. I was forbidden from ever mentioning dinner to him (as in going out to dinner) or he'd flip and start raging. One night he threw something at my dishwasher and shattered plates because I merely mentioned he had said we might go out to dinner. Why I put up with him for things to even get to that point was largely a function of the fact I'd been recently Dx'd with BPD and he worked in mental health. I was made to doubt myself constantly.

Unless one walks in these shoes, it's awfully hard to understand we are not crazy. Given to mood swings and other expressions - yes, crazy no. Unless one is of the manic variety and psychotic. Then I will say crazy applies in that state of mind. I don't know if you ever saw that movie "The Hours" with Nicole Kidman. In it, she played Virginia Woolf (who had BPD). I get that movie and I get her state of mind. If that is crazy, then "normal people" sure view life differently than I do.

Well, that's my two cents.
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Old 12-27-2008, 10:08 AM
 
Location: southern california
53,432 posts, read 68,420,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by movin'on View Post
Your points are well taken, but I think you might be overreacting just a bit. Can you share a personal experience with me where someone with BPD was a safety issue to someone else?
i dont think you would want me to do that but if you insist. you are right it was only a 25 caliber browning and even though all 7 shots hit none of them were to the head. you are right i tend to overreact.

Last edited by Huckleberry3911948; 12-27-2008 at 10:23 AM..
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Old 12-27-2008, 10:21 AM
 
4,246 posts, read 8,763,787 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huckleberry3911948 View Post
i dont think you would want me to do that but if you insist. you are right it was only a 25 caliber browning and even though all 7 shots hit none of them were to the head. you are right i tend to overreact. i have lots more did you want me to continue?
No, but I will share this...

Quote:
Mentally Ill are Often Victims of Violent Crime

A British study has joined earlier research is demonstrating that, contrary to media stereotypes and the rhetoric of forced treatment advocates, people with psychiatric disabilities are far more apt to be victims, not perpetrators of violent crime.
Mentally Ill More Likely to be Victims (http://www.namiscc.org/newsletters/December01/statistics.htm - broken link)
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Old 05-23-2013, 10:08 PM
 
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The list of people is interesting, but I dont know if its accurate, where does that information come from? There is no backup of the source its taken from.
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Old 05-23-2013, 11:12 PM
 
Location: earth?
7,288 posts, read 9,602,053 times
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I don't believe in labeling people and don't know why anyone would want to identify themselves by a pathological label. There must be some kind of payoff. Why wouldn't you rather think of yourself as a person with (whatever your talents are) instead of your socially assigned, made-up pathological labels?
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Old 05-24-2013, 12:24 PM
Status: ""Abortion Stops A Beating Heart!"" (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Kansas
18,370 posts, read 12,080,051 times
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Don't you believe though that people are referring to a lot of other personality issues as "mental illness"? That is what I have seen here too often since there is a very big difference between the two. I have seen complaints about emotional vampires as that is more an issue of one's personality than anything else. To me, mental illness is not that obvious. I used to walk and talk with a younger lady than myself and one day she told me that she was bi-polar but that made no difference but I know it would to some people. And, "depressed" is more than being bored or upset your boyfriend/girlfriend dumped you. I see people here being sucked in as a sounding board and that is difficult and I have cut more than one person out of my life like that. Mental illness is more like physical illness in that it requires treatment but if the person is refusing treatment, there is not a lot you can do by being there for them. Needing a mental health professional for mental illness is not the same is needing a friend to gripe to about your life or so I am convinced.
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