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Unread 09-02-2010, 10:10 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,147,331 times
Reputation: 919
Chelsa

You must distinguish modern Argentinean Tango, created at the San Telmo barrio of Buenos Aires some 130 years ago by the blacks and mulattoes living there (some left) and the rich people and low lifes that used to frequent the place.

Historical Tango and Tanguillos were created in Havana, Cuba some 250 years ago, and became extremely popular in Spain during the XVIII and XIX centuries (now part of the Flamenco music). Tangos and Tanguillos are still part of the repertoire of Flamenco music. Historical Tango was created in Havana by Andalusian blacks expelled by the Inquisition.

Argentinean Tango (120 years old) and Historical Tango are NOT related.

The same happens with Bolero. Bolero was an Andalusian dance created some 200 years ago not related with modern Bolero, created in Cuba 100 years ago.

 
Unread 09-02-2010, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Cooper City, by way of NYC
2,756 posts, read 3,806,422 times
Reputation: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manolón View Post
"Coger" (to take) is the sexual act in Argentina, but not in the rest of the Americas or Spain.
Right but I just started dating him and had no idea that it meant that and I was say "cojer" not "coger" - his family new it as well, but I still got a funny luck.
 
Unread 09-02-2010, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Cooper City, by way of NYC
2,756 posts, read 3,806,422 times
Reputation: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manolón View Post
Chelsa

You must distinguish modern Argentinean Tango, created at the San Telmo barrio of Buenos Aires some 130 years ago by the blacks and mulattoes living there (some left) and the rich people and low lifes that used to frequent the place.

Historical Tango and Tanguillos were created in Havana, Cuba some 250 years ago, and became extremely popular in Spain during the XVIII and XIX centuries (now part of the Flamenco music). Tangos and Tanguillos are still part of the repertoire of Flamenco music. Historical Tango was created in Havana by Andalusian blacks expelled by the Inquisition.

Argentinean Tango (120 years old) and Historical Tango are NOT related.

The same happens with Bolero. Bolero was an Andalusian dance created some 200 years ago not related with modern Bolero, created in Cuba 100 years ago.

Sweety, I don't need to distinguish either. I'm not really interested in the dance - I will learn about it as much as I can for my kids sake but it isn't a part of my culture so, I won't know all these details, nor am I looking them up. I am simply going on the behaviors of the family I have been involved with for almost 20 years. But I do thank you for the History lesson of sorts - I feel like you are trying to debate everything I am writing here (please tell me I'm wrong). Are you an Argentine Historian? Are you Argentinean? Did you grow up with them? I only ask because the statement you made about morocho seems to put a nicer spin on it than is intended - in my experience when an Argentinean says someone is morocho - they are not speaking very nicely about that person. Almost as if they are beneath them. Just my experience.
 
Unread 09-02-2010, 11:18 AM
 
163 posts, read 200,143 times
Reputation: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelsa1075 View Post
Logger - he is Mexican American - where did you read/hear that he was Puerto Rican?
You are right!! I always thought he was the mexican-looking Puerto Rican but that is Erik Estrada. Sorry about that
 
Unread 09-02-2010, 11:28 AM
 
163 posts, read 200,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manolón View Post
"Coger" (to take) is the sexual act in Argentina, but not in the rest of the Americas or Spain.
Coger (sexual act) is also used in Uruguay, Paraguay and most countries in Central America (it was consistently used that way in Costa Rica, Honduras and Nicaragua when I went there) and frequently in Mexico.
 
Unread 09-02-2010, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Cooper City, by way of NYC
2,756 posts, read 3,806,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loggerhead Shrike View Post
You are right!! I always thought he was the mexican-looking Puerto Rican but that is Erik Estrada. Sorry about that

Ha ha - you mean CHIPS LOL - I guess he could look Mexican - he looks more like un Jibaro to me but then again, I have always known him to be Puerto Rican so, in my mind he looks the part.

You know what kind of peeves me (my own dialect) when J-Lo who looks very hispanic in my opinion - plays the part of an italian girl or what ever - I don't get why she can't be an hispanic woman marrying a white man? Why do you think that is - is it taboo?
 
Unread 09-02-2010, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Cooper City, by way of NYC
2,756 posts, read 3,806,422 times
Reputation: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loggerhead Shrike View Post
Coger (sexual act) is also used in Uruguay, Paraguay and most countries in Central America (it was consistently used that way in Costa Rica, Honduras and Nicaragua when I went there) and frequently in Mexico.
Really, in Paraquay? Never would have thought - wonder what it is in guarani? Is it pronounced exactly the same! That is insanity - who would thunk it!
 
Unread 09-02-2010, 12:34 PM
 
2,940 posts, read 3,570,509 times
Reputation: 1301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loggerhead Shrike View Post
Coger (sexual act) is also used in Uruguay, Paraguay and most countries in Central America (it was consistently used that way in Costa Rica, Honduras and Nicaragua when I went there) and frequently in Mexico.
it must be the nicaraguans that made that word unpopular in Miami. I know most Hispanics know the double meaning

chelsa Manolon is the designated Miami historian. The only problem is that his postS are not 100% accurate as he lives in Spain and what he knows about Miami dates back to the 1950's-1970's.
 
Unread 09-02-2010, 12:37 PM
 
163 posts, read 200,143 times
Reputation: 98
Yes, the J-Lo thing bugs me sometimes but I guess that Hispanic actors might complain if they are placed in Hispanic roles only. Many non-hispanics also play Hispanics. I have seen plenty of Italians though that look very stereotypical "latino" though. Maybe J-Lo is carrying it a bit too far, she does look very Boricua to me.
 
Unread 09-02-2010, 12:50 PM
 
139 posts, read 188,870 times
Reputation: 84
it bothered me that some actresses would not play typical latina roles until i heard that it was because they didn't want to be typecast or just stereotyped as a "spicy latina", which i understand can be very irritating. if it's for the purpose of not perpetuating negative gender stereotypes, they have the right to refuse the latina label. sucks, though, that it has to be this way.

i'm always trying to avoid using "cojer" to mean "get" or "to get" something, but sometimes it slips and my in-laws just look at me funny.

only been married a year, so...
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