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Old 04-26-2011, 06:00 PM
 
278 posts, read 320,436 times
Reputation: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmlacysr View Post
If they would have spoken the language of the United states, they wouldn't have to endure my attempt at speaking a foreign one.

It's not a good sign when the top icon on my phone is google translate and I feel the need to use it, just for the public facilities in my own country. Maybe I should have asked for a cup-o.

I didnt know FLO-RI-DA was a former British colony.

I always thought it was the Spanish Europeans the ones that colonizad Florida (21 years before the english arrived up North in the 1500's).

 
Old 04-26-2011, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Delray Beach
911 posts, read 849,608 times
Reputation: 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Optional Angel View Post
The United States doesn't have a language.
Hablamos lo que nos de la gana.

Remember that you have to share "your" country with another 300 million people, over 10% of which e-speak e-spanish.
90% speak mine. If I only encountered 1 out of 10 people in Miami that could not speak English, I would have no problem.

English is the de facto national language. Although there is no official language at the federal level, some laws—such as U.S. naturalization requirements—standardize English. In 2007, about 226 million, or 80% of the population aged five years and older, spoke only English at home. Spanish, spoken by 12% of the population at home, is the second most common language and the most widely taught second language.[139][140] Some Americans advocate making English the country's official language, as it is in at least twenty-eight states.[5] Both Hawaiian and English are official languages in Hawaii by state law.[141]
While neither has an official language, New Mexico has laws providing for the use of both English and Spanish, as Louisiana does for English and French.[142] Other states, such as California, mandate the publication of Spanish versions of certain government documents including court forms.[143] Several insular territories grant official recognition to their native languages, along with English: Samoan and Chamorro are recognized by American Samoa and Guam, respectively; Carolinian and Chamorro are recognized by the Northern Mariana Islands; Spanish is an official language of Puerto Rico.
 
Old 04-26-2011, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Miami, FL
780 posts, read 794,505 times
Reputation: 565
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmlacysr View Post
90% speak mine. If I only encountered 1 out of 10 people in Miami that could not speak English, I would have no problem.

English is the de facto national language. Although there is no official language at the federal level, some laws—such as U.S. naturalization requirements—standardize English. In 2007, about 226 million, or 80% of the population aged five years and older, spoke only English at home. Spanish, spoken by 12% of the population at home, is the second most common language and the most widely taught second language.[139][140] Some Americans advocate making English the country's official language, as it is in at least twenty-eight states.[5] Both Hawaiian and English are official languages in Hawaii by state law.[141]
While neither has an official language, New Mexico has laws providing for the use of both English and Spanish, as Louisiana does for English and French.[142] Other states, such as California, mandate the publication of Spanish versions of certain government documents including court forms.[143] Several insular territories grant official recognition to their native languages, along with English: Samoan and Chamorro are recognized by American Samoa and Guam, respectively; Carolinian and Chamorro are recognized by the Northern Mariana Islands; Spanish is an official language of Puerto Rico.
I'm sure there are tons of places in the US where over 88% speak English. If I encountered 1 out of 10 people in Beckley, West Virginia that could speak Spanish, I would be happy.
 
Old 04-26-2011, 06:24 PM
 
Location: West Kendall
4,741 posts, read 4,589,988 times
Reputation: 1090
Speak English or die!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Old 04-26-2011, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Delray Beach
911 posts, read 849,608 times
Reputation: 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Venezuelan View Post
I didnt know FLO-RI-DA was a former British colony.

I always thought it was the Spanish Europeans the ones that colonizad Florida (21 years before the english arrived up North in the 1500's).
I don't give a damn if the Chinese colonized Florida. What's with you people?

That's you're excuse for not learning English when you come here, something that happened 500 god damn years ago? If you want to get technical, we should speaking the language of the Tequesta.
Tequesta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Is there a single public school that teaches Spanish as a first language in the USA? How about Florida? How about Miami? How about Hialeah? Where?
 
Old 04-26-2011, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Delray Beach
911 posts, read 849,608 times
Reputation: 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by WINTERFRONT View Post
Speak English or die!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
No, speak English or don't lock the bathroom door.
 
Old 04-26-2011, 06:44 PM
 
278 posts, read 320,436 times
Reputation: 163
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmlacysr View Post
I don't give a damn if the Chinese colonized Florida. What's with you people?

That's you're excuse for not learning English when you come here, something that happened 500 god damn years ago? If you want to get technical, we should speaking the language of the Tequesta.
Tequesta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Is there a single public school that teaches Spanish as a first language in the USA? How about Florida? How about Miami? How about Hialeah? Where?
Me, myself, and the other 97% of Miamians are Bilingual.

You are just someone, who doesnt even know about US history.
 
Old 04-26-2011, 06:49 PM
 
Location: West Kendall
4,741 posts, read 4,589,988 times
Reputation: 1090
Miami doesn't exist.
 
Old 04-26-2011, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Delray Beach
911 posts, read 849,608 times
Reputation: 395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Venezuelan View Post
Me, myself, and the other 97% of Miamians are Bilingual.

You are just someone, who doesnt even know about US history.
Answer the question.
Is there a single public school that teaches Spanish as a first language in the USA? How about Florida? How about Miami? How about Hialeah? Where?
 
Old 04-26-2011, 07:07 PM
 
Location: West Kendall
4,741 posts, read 4,589,988 times
Reputation: 1090
I was taught in spanish here in Miami, but the material was in english... and that doesn't count. I just say that in case someone wants to answer you with that.
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