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Old 07-04-2012, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Miami/ Washington DC
4,836 posts, read 10,157,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WINTERFRONT View Post
It's immense... considering that barely 2 million people live here. 400,000 is still a low number for the city of Miami proper.
400,000 is a low number for an area of 35sqmiles??

You mention the distance between Florida City and Aventura, yes long but look how narrow the urban area is between Florida city and up to about the Zoo.
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WINTERFRONT View Post
It's immense... considering that barely 2 million people live here. 400,000 is still a low number for the city of Miami proper.
There are more than 2 million people in Miami-Dade county. The 2010 Census counted 2,496,435 residents.
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Old 07-04-2012, 03:22 PM
 
Location: West Kendall
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To make things more clear...

State the reasons why you think Miami Dade (populated area) is not an example of sprawl.
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Old 07-04-2012, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Miami/ Washington DC
4,836 posts, read 10,157,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WINTERFRONT View Post
To make things more clear...

State the reasons why you think Miami Dade (populated area) is not an example of sprawl.
Phoniex, Los Angeles, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, San Jose.
http://renewlv.files.wordpress.com/2...-on-travel.jpg

For a young sunbelt city it's not bad for a U.S. city. Compared to older cities espcially around the world Miami does have some sprawl. But the city has natural borders. In LA you can drive miles and miles and it's endless suburbs. Same in Atlanta, in Miami after 25mins of driving it stops and you are suddenly on the ocean or in the Evergaldes where it feels like you are in the middle of no where.
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Old 07-04-2012, 04:35 PM
 
Location: West Kendall
4,919 posts, read 8,522,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyMIA View Post
Phoniex, Los Angeles, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, San Jose.
http://renewlv.files.wordpress.com/2...-on-travel.jpg

For a young sunbelt city it's not bad for a U.S. city. Compared to older cities espcially around the world Miami does have some sprawl. But the city has natural borders. In LA you can drive miles and miles and it's endless suburbs. Same in Atlanta, in Miami after 25mins of driving it stops and you are suddenly on the ocean or in the Evergaldes where it feels like you are in the middle of no where.

That only mentions traffic due to sprawl, but it doesn't necessarily say that metropolitan areas around Riverside, Austin, Sacramento are not examples of sprawl. Yes, some are bigger than others, you have a point there as it was never thought otherwise, but if you are saying that there is no sprawl on the mentioned areas just because their circle is not that big on the given map, then, the way you are using your source is rather incorrect. Adding to this, it fails to explain why Miami is not considered an example of sprawl.

Sprawl is characterized by the style of development and land use...Low population density, car dependent developments, house subdivisions,, huge parking lots, shopping centers, the segregation of commercial and residential use, etc... are what make Miami what it is. That's sprawl,there is nothing more to it. There are far worse examples than Miami - Los Angeles - but that doesn't clean Miami off the guilt.
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Old 07-04-2012, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Miami/ Washington DC
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I agree Miami has sprawl, I agree with what you said. All I am saying ucompared to other cities it could be a lot worse. I think we both agree with that. Thankfully we started caring about the Everglades or Miami would be endless.
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Old 07-04-2012, 10:24 PM
 
Location: West Kendall
4,919 posts, read 8,522,662 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyMIA View Post
I agree Miami has sprawl, I agree with what you said. All I am saying ucompared to other cities it could be a lot worse. I think we both agree with that. Thankfully we started caring about the Everglades or Miami would be endless.
Yeah, good thing is that sprawl is becoming a thing of the past; little by little though. Densification is the new move:

Subdivisions go urban as housing market changes

Planned Densification

I encourage people to read: SPRAWL REPAIR MANUAL by Galina Tachieva.

Spoiler
Sprawl remains the prevailing growth pattern across the United States, even though experts in planning, economics and environmental issues have long denounced it as wasteful, inefficient, and unsustainable. Sprawl is a principal cause of lost open space and natural habitat as well as increases in air and water pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, infrastructure costs, and even obesity. It also plays a primary role in the housing meltdown plaguing the nation. But is it possible to repair sprawling suburbs and create more livable, robust, and eco-sensitive communities where they do not now exist? This new book answers with a resounding "yes" and provides a toolbox of creative approaches for doing just that.

The Sprawl Repair Manual offers comprehensive guidance for transforming fragmented, isolated and car-dependent development into "complete communities." Polemical as well as practical, the manual is designed to equip readers - from professional planners, designers, and developers to regulators and concerned citizens - with strategies drawn from two decades of successful repair projects.

In contrast to sprawl - characterized by an abundance of congested highways, strip development, and gated cul-de-sac subdivisions - complete communities are diverse in terms of uses, transportation options, and population. They are walkable, with most daily needs close by.

There is a wealth of research and literature explaining the origins and problems of suburban sprawl, as well as the urgent need to repair it. However, the Sprawl Repair Manual is the first book to provide a step-by-step design, regulatory, and implementation process. From the scale of the region to the building - turning subdivisions into walkable neighborhoods, shopping centers and malls into town centers, and more - today's sprawl can be saved. Readers who have despaired of ever being able to "take back the suburbs" will find heartening news between the covers of this first-of-its-kind book.

Many of the techniques demonstrated in the book are derived from the work and built projects of Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company (DPZ) over the last twenty years. This effort would not have been possible if the book had not been produced in the DPZ office, supported with the patience and generosity of all partners - especially Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk and Andrés Duany - and aided by the dedicated, talented and savvy contributing team of Judith I. Bell, Maria Elisa Mercer and Rachel D. Merson-Zitofsky and illustrated so gorgeously by Eusebio Azcue and Chris Ritter. Brian Falk at the Center for Applied Transect Studies (CATS), was a thoughtful and challenging advisor< on all issues related to writing, content and publishing while Heather Boyer was an enthusiastic supporter and sponsoring editor at Island Press.
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Old 07-05-2012, 01:24 PM
 
1,183 posts, read 1,467,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfside__ View Post
San francisco is very small land wise and it is no where near as ghetto as MIA.

Is gentrification the key to prosperity?
gentrification's NOT the key to prosperity. You're just shoving poor people to another place. You're really not getting rid of crime, poverty, and other ills that come from poverty. You're not getting rid of poverty you're just pushing it away to other areas.

Last edited by homenj; 07-05-2012 at 01:55 PM..
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Old 07-05-2012, 02:19 PM
 
419 posts, read 825,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homenj View Post
gentrification's NOT the key to prosperity. You're just shoving poor people to another place. You're really not getting rid of crime, poverty, and other ills that come from poverty. You're not getting rid of poverty you're just pushing it away to other areas.
I think gentrification IS the key to prosperity. Look at ANY developed neighborhood where crime is low, schools are good, and comfort in life is so much better. That won't be in low income areas I'll tell you that much! Gentrication would transform neighborhoods and make it much desirable place for the entire county. No only is crime greatly reducing, and more security is put on our streets, but that also means less tax payer money to support all the crime, poverty, and problems that low income neighborhoods come along with it. Less poor = MORE prosperous look at anywhere in the nation where people are at peace and not having to deal with problems and poverty, the comfort of LIFE is much easier for people, and so is the quality of life. Driving out the poor is not a bad thing, they will eventually settle somewhere where they CAN afford it, but they shouldn't be living on land that can be very desirable, and not having any desire to improve the community.
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Old 07-05-2012, 03:20 PM
 
1,183 posts, read 1,467,985 times
Reputation: 879
then why don't you fix the problems of poverty? if they move someplace else all those problems will still be there. Plus the poor provide cheap labor. No big city thrives without the poeple who work in the service industry like McDonald's, BK, construction, etc.

Many low income communities across the country have events, programs, etc that are done by the community and for the community. Why shouldn't Miami look into this first before simply gentrifying the neighborhood?
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