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View Poll Results: How many months is the humidity uncomfortable?
0-1 month 5 15.15%
2-3 months 4 12.12%
4-5 months 12 36.36%
6 months 2 6.06%
7 months 2 6.06%
8 months 8 24.24%
Voters: 33. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-12-2014, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
546 posts, read 662,807 times
Reputation: 442

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Miami residents: I would like to know how many months out of the year you find the humidity uncomforatble? I know this is subjective....to each their own. And I know I can't stop non-residents from voting.

A So.Calif. native who likes Miami (maybe to live) but is not crazy about humidity would like to get a local perspective. I've been to Miami in July but I was a tourist and I know that isn't the same as living it every day.

Thanks.
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Old 05-12-2014, 06:51 PM
 
113 posts, read 170,540 times
Reputation: 52
You should have one more option on there "only when I step outside because I live in the A/C from April-September."
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Old 05-12-2014, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
546 posts, read 662,807 times
Reputation: 442
Ok, I take it you'd vote 6 months or more......
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Old 05-12-2014, 08:57 PM
 
113 posts, read 170,540 times
Reputation: 52
But that's just it. It doesn't bother me because I am rarely outside. This goes for a lot of people down here. People don't walk around place much here.
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Old 05-13-2014, 07:47 PM
 
1,448 posts, read 2,155,226 times
Reputation: 2358
This is a really personal issue, so you need to access more for how you respond to humidity than how others do.

Another way to look at it is, people don't tend to acclimate to humidity as much as they do to temperature. So, when you have been in really high humidity (close to 100%), were you uncomfortable to a point that would be hard to live with? I can't live in the desert, my body isn't made for it. Every time I am in very low humidity my lips crack immediately no matter how hydrated I am, I get a fever, and my skin breaks out in rashes. Some people are like that with humidity, they absolutely can't take it.

Consider some of the following which might help you decide if you will like it. If the humidity in July was oppressive when you visited, then that is how it is here every single day for 4 months out of the year - pretty much June through Sept. (If it wasn't oppressive, what you experienced was abnormal for the season, because it can make it hard to breathe or move at that high heat and 100% humidity, especially with low breeze.)

During those months especially, you will sweat every single time you leave home to walk to your car, or to walk your dog. You will sweat every single time you walk anywhere for more than 60 seconds at a time. You will likely then enter a blast of frigid air, especially at work or in a store. It can be hard for a body to take all day, up and down. If you are an active, athletic person, the humidity will challenge your body. You will have to hydrate with electrolytes constantly to replace the sweat, and avoid cramping. It might not be fun to do anything outdoors during the entire rainy season, from May to October. If you are overweight or thin but eat a lot, it will be hard to keep your body temperature low and you will sweat constantly.

In Miami there is a battle between style and comfort. You'll acclimatize to the heat within 2 months (the heat is worse than SoCal because of the humidity). But still, you will tend to be uncomfortable because Miami locals wear pants and sometimes even long sleeves or jackets in 80-90F. This is especially true if you are among FL natives or the Caribbean population, in part because they don't feel hot, and in part it's just the style. I never, ever, ever see people wearing shorts to go out in public (other than for exercise) in Miami except for in South Beach. It may be harder to stay comfortable because of pressure to wear clothes to fit in that don't allow much breathing. But you can wear sandals or Dockers all year long, and you may never wear another sock again.

You will need to keep the windows shut and the A/C on pretty much year round. That is an expense and a lifestyle change. You may need the heat for 2 weeks of the year, as Miami sometimes dips to freezing. You have to run the A/C regularly because if you don't your home can develop mold. It may be hard to find a balance if you sleep with the A/C on between feeling a draft while it's running, and then sweating every time it stops. Fans are your friend, run them at the same time as air conditioning and you can keep the thermostat higher and also have more consistent air flow which will likely increase comfort.

If you don't find the humidity oppressive, you might find the mosquitoes to be so. They swarm with the humidity, and in the summer can be in clouds as thick as the air. If you are the type of person to whom they are attracted, it will be difficult although not impossible to ward every type of them off - there are different species that come out at different times of day.

So the question is, are you ok with sweating several times a day into your clothes for maybe 4 months or so straight? Can you just bring a change of clothes and some deodorant, or will you be uncomfortable all day at work? Granted, the torrential downpours during that part of the year may wash your clothes while you wear them so at least you won't smell...
Can you handle the higher energy bills? Can you maintain your current level of activity and lifestyle in these conditions?

If you're used to being outdoors all the time, and then you end up inside for half the year like the above poster said (which is certainly true for many people although I am outside for at least an hour every day), you will be unhappy. Consider that if you live inland in Miami-Dade, there will be almost no breeze ever, which will make the humidity much worse. It's far more bearable on the coast.

During the dry season, it will still be higher humidity than you're used to. Often 70-85%. But, most people find it really comfortable. The average temps are in the 70s or 80, and you're not going to sweat just walking around, unless you are someone who sweats all the time in any condition. It will be 65 and below for about a month.

Some people can work around all this. Most of the time, I like high humidity. I prefer it, except when the temps get in the high 90s and there is no breeze. Consider that people already living in FL are likely to be people who really like it, or who were born here and are just used to it, so that would skew your results. What you need to know, is can YOU personally take it? You are the only one who can answer that.


Wow-- I didn't know I have so much to say about humidity! I never thought about these things much before, but I guess they do affect the lifestyle here a lot. Does it sound like you could deal?
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Old 05-13-2014, 07:53 PM
 
577 posts, read 1,582,855 times
Reputation: 445
I think this should be clarified as someone who is living in AC all the time is definitely bothered.. hence the AC 24/7. We get maybe 1-2 days at most here in Sacramento area and do outside activities all summer long. It may be in the 90's or 100 but a dry heat is much easier to deal with than humidity. This rules out multiple states for me to think about living in as I love the outdoors and being stuck inside in AC would drive me nuts. I mean many of those states that have high humidity go from being stuck inside due to snow to being stuck inside due to humidity... sorry that isn't living... that's prison!
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Old 05-13-2014, 09:15 PM
 
10,357 posts, read 7,983,248 times
Reputation: 4547
Quote:
Originally Posted by StarfishKey View Post
This is a really personal issue, so you need to access more for how you respond to humidity than how others do.

Another way to look at it is, people don't tend to acclimate to humidity as much as they do to temperature. So, when you have been in really high humidity (close to 100%), were you uncomfortable to a point that would be hard to live with? I can't live in the desert, my body isn't made for it. Every time I am in very low humidity my lips crack immediately no matter how hydrated I am, I get a fever, and my skin breaks out in rashes. Some people are like that with humidity, they absolutely can't take it.

Consider some of the following which might help you decide if you will like it. If the humidity in July was oppressive when you visited, then that is how it is here every single day for 4 months out of the year - pretty much June through Sept. (If it wasn't oppressive, what you experienced was abnormal for the season, because it can make it hard to breathe or move at that high heat and 100% humidity, especially with low breeze.)

During those months especially, you will sweat every single time you leave home to walk to your car, or to walk your dog. You will sweat every single time you walk anywhere for more than 60 seconds at a time. You will likely then enter a blast of frigid air, especially at work or in a store. It can be hard for a body to take all day, up and down. If you are an active, athletic person, the humidity will challenge your body. You will have to hydrate with electrolytes constantly to replace the sweat, and avoid cramping. It might not be fun to do anything outdoors during the entire rainy season, from May to October. If you are overweight or thin but eat a lot, it will be hard to keep your body temperature low and you will sweat constantly.

In Miami there is a battle between style and comfort. You'll acclimatize to the heat within 2 months (the heat is worse than SoCal because of the humidity). But still, you will tend to be uncomfortable because Miami locals wear pants and sometimes even long sleeves or jackets in 80-90F. This is especially true if you are among FL natives or the Caribbean population, in part because they don't feel hot, and in part it's just the style. I never, ever, ever see people wearing shorts to go out in public (other than for exercise) in Miami except for in South Beach. It may be harder to stay comfortable because of pressure to wear clothes to fit in that don't allow much breathing. But you can wear sandals or Dockers all year long, and you may never wear another sock again.

You will need to keep the windows shut and the A/C on pretty much year round. That is an expense and a lifestyle change. You may need the heat for 2 weeks of the year, as Miami sometimes dips to freezing. You have to run the A/C regularly because if you don't your home can develop mold. It may be hard to find a balance if you sleep with the A/C on between feeling a draft while it's running, and then sweating every time it stops. Fans are your friend, run them at the same time as air conditioning and you can keep the thermostat higher and also have more consistent air flow which will likely increase comfort.

If you don't find the humidity oppressive, you might find the mosquitoes to be so. They swarm with the humidity, and in the summer can be in clouds as thick as the air. If you are the type of person to whom they are attracted, it will be difficult although not impossible to ward every type of them off - there are different species that come out at different times of day.

So the question is, are you ok with sweating several times a day into your clothes for maybe 4 months or so straight? Can you just bring a change of clothes and some deodorant, or will you be uncomfortable all day at work? Granted, the torrential downpours during that part of the year may wash your clothes while you wear them so at least you won't smell...
Can you handle the higher energy bills? Can you maintain your current level of activity and lifestyle in these conditions?

If you're used to being outdoors all the time, and then you end up inside for half the year like the above poster said (which is certainly true for many people although I am outside for at least an hour every day), you will be unhappy. Consider that if you live inland in Miami-Dade, there will be almost no breeze ever, which will make the humidity much worse. It's far more bearable on the coast.

During the dry season, it will still be higher humidity than you're used to. Often 70-85%. But, most people find it really comfortable. The average temps are in the 70s or 80, and you're not going to sweat just walking around, unless you are someone who sweats all the time in any condition. It will be 65 and below for about a month.

Some people can work around all this. Most of the time, I like high humidity. I prefer it, except when the temps get in the high 90s and there is no breeze. Consider that people already living in FL are likely to be people who really like it, or who were born here and are just used to it, so that would skew your results. What you need to know, is can YOU personally take it? You are the only one who can answer that.


Wow-- I didn't know I have so much to say about humidity! I never thought about these things much before, but I guess they do affect the lifestyle here a lot. Does it sound like you could deal?
Good post, very informative.

I don't understand why people are wearing pants if it's extremely hot and humid. That would just make it worse.
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Old 05-14-2014, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Whispering pines, cutler bay FL.
1,912 posts, read 2,200,255 times
Reputation: 2054
The bad months are between June through early October. I refer to those months as the equivalent of the northern states "winter" because we tend to stay indoor in the AC. The one certain break from the heat would be the afternoon thunderstorm, which are dramatic and produce strong breezes but right after when the sun shines agin the humitiy is pretty bad.

June is also the beginning of rainy season down here so inland afternoon thunderstorms are the norm.
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Old 05-14-2014, 09:41 AM
 
1,448 posts, read 2,155,226 times
Reputation: 2358
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasmine728 View Post
I think this should be clarified as someone who is living in AC all the time is definitely bothered.. hence the AC 24/7. We get maybe 1-2 days at most here in Sacramento area and do outside activities all summer long. It may be in the 90's or 100 but a dry heat is much easier to deal with than humidity. This rules out multiple states for me to think about living in as I love the outdoors and being stuck inside in AC would drive me nuts. I mean many of those states that have high humidity go from being stuck inside due to snow to being stuck inside due to humidity... sorry that isn't living... that's prison!
I don't relate to this perspective. At least half the people in the US live in locations where they have heaters on in their homes 24/7, or wear winter coats and boots every time they go outside. I wouldn't equate this to living in prison.

Just because the A/C is on, doesn't mean you have to stay inside. I go outside every single day and am active, but then I come back in to buildings that have the A/C on 24/7 and cool off.

On the other hand, if you mean those people who are saying they never leave the house, then yeah... but I don't think the OP is that person otherwise why even post the thread? Some people may choose to be inside all day, but it doesn't mean they're bothered - some people just like to be inside all the time, no matter what the weather.

Not everyone finds dry heat easier - I would pretty much die in 100 degrees in the desert after just an hour or two. But I can stand 100 degrees in humidity much easier, because it protects my skin from drying out and becoming full of rashes and irritation - I don't dehydrate nearly as easily here. I have found that I had to drink 4 times the water in dry places as I do in a humid place to stay hydrated. I think it depends on the individual body, some people cope with dry much better, and some people cope with humidity much better.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:13 AM
 
8,204 posts, read 11,921,160 times
Reputation: 18020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cubanchic View Post
The bad months are between June through early October. I refer to those months as the equivalent of the northern states "winter" because we tend to stay indoor in the AC. The one certain break from the heat would be the afternoon thunderstorm, which are dramatic and produce strong breezes but right after when the sun shines agin the humitiy is pretty bad.

June is also the beginning of rainy season down here so inland afternoon thunderstorms are the norm.
The key word is inland. Miami averages significantly more rainfall than Miami Beach (~20%), especially in the summer. In fact, if one is bothered by humidity, there is no better place to live in SoFla than Miami Beach. And the closer to the beach the better. The constant ocean breeze really ameliorates the humidity issue.
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