U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Miami
 [Register]
Miami Miami-Dade County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-19-2008, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 23,199,835 times
Reputation: 4895

Advertisements

Nobody can say for sure. No city has been hit by a real healthy hurricane that had high-rises. However, even if the building survives it is to no avail. A storm surge will flood below-grade garages and most transformer rooms. Without power high-rises are not inhabitable. Also many high-rises in Miami-Dade are built on marginal land on pilings. It is very probable that if the windows do not break enough pressure can be put on those buildings to cause structural damage. While they will not collapse, cracks could prompt building inspectors to deem the structure as unsafe, and you are homeless. Remember, in a high-rise you are often just one violation from being on the street. Since you own nothing but a share in the complex, you end up paying a mortgage and maintenance while you live on the street. I would never risk my money on a piece of air. If only one major high-rise is decimated in a hurricane, you may never be able to get insurance again.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-19-2008, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Miami
763 posts, read 3,167,482 times
Reputation: 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
Nobody can say for sure. No city has been hit by a real healthy hurricane that had high-rises. However, even if the building survives it is to no avail. A storm surge will flood below-grade garages and most transformer rooms. Without power high-rises are not inhabitable. Also many high-rises in Miami-Dade are built on marginal land on pilings. It is very probable that if the windows do not break enough pressure can be put on those buildings to cause structural damage. While they will not collapse, cracks could prompt building inspectors to deem the structure as unsafe, and you are homeless. Remember, in a high-rise you are often just one violation from being on the street. Since you own nothing but a share in the complex, you end up paying a mortgage and maintenance while you live on the street. I would never risk my money on a piece of air. If only one major high-rise is decimated in a hurricane, you may never be able to get insurance again.
How depressing for the thousands of people in Miami that live in high-rises! It's seriously not that bad. The buildings are built to really tough codes and in a city like Miami where hurricanes do happen, the buildings are built to prepare for emergencies, ie: transformer rooms with back-up. And like rnc2mbfl said, high-rises are the first homes to get power, because of the amount of people that reside in them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2008, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Downtown Raleigh, NC
2,086 posts, read 6,798,056 times
Reputation: 1298
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Wasn't it determined that the glass breakage had more to do with tornado's that were spawned by the storm rather than the storm winds themselves? I don't think that any amount of protection or laminated glass would have saved the windows under those circumstances. In my building, we didn't have any windows break and we aren't even up to the latest and greatest codes.
You are probably right about that. I think that in many hurricanes, the worst damage is done by tornados. Many people don't realize that many many tornados form during the course of a hurricane, and you will certainly not have any warning of them (experienced this first-hand in Andrew and it was scary as hell).

One thing to consider is that if you are living near the water, be it in a high rise, SFH or anything else, there is a very good chance you will be required to evacuate for most storms. Would it be safe to say that most of the high rise condo buildings in Miami are in mandatory evacuation zones?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2008, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Houston, Tx
3,644 posts, read 5,400,193 times
Reputation: 1613
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Another thing to consider when thinking of storms is that condo towers on the beach and downtown tend to have their electricity restored sooner than single family homes do. After Wilma, our electricity was restored in less than 36 hours. FPL connects one building and they get hundreds of customers up and running. It looks good to their data of customers restored.
I used to live in a condo (non-highrise) right behind The Falls. I always got my power back in 8 hours or less because I was on the same grid as a hospital. God, I loved that. I mentioned it as a selling point every time I rented it out. I'm in Homestead in a new area now. I'm sure it will take a week or more to restore power here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2008, 08:32 PM
 
Location: 43.55N 69.58W
3,231 posts, read 6,533,662 times
Reputation: 2972
I'm in a 16 story - 256 unit highrise on the beach. I feel perfectly safe with the hurricane resistant windows and hurricane shutters. Granted, I'm not in the penthouse, but somewhere in the middle. Sure, I'll remove the stuff from the balcony and 'hunker down' but a Zone 1 evacuation isn't mandatory. I'm allowed to stay if I so choose. I'll stay. I'll be fine. I'm also on the same grid as the local fire station.

Besides, I've never been to a hurricane party!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2008, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Downtown Raleigh, NC
2,086 posts, read 6,798,056 times
Reputation: 1298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fort Lauderdale mermaid View Post
I'm in a 16 story - 256 unit highrise on the beach. I feel perfectly safe with the hurricane resistant windows and hurricane shutters. Granted, I'm not in the penthouse, but somewhere in the middle. Sure, I'll remove the stuff from the balcony and 'hunker down' but a Zone 1 evacuation isn't mandatory. I'm allowed to stay if I so choose. I'll stay. I'll be fine. I'm also on the same grid as the local fire station.

Besides, I've never been to a hurricane party!
Did you ride out the 2005 'canes in your condo? I am wondering what those were like. I rode all of them out in the same house I feared for my life in during Andrew. We didn't put all the shutters up for Katrina and it scared the crap out of me - flashbacks are not fun. We had no power for over a week after Katrina, but just a few days after Wilma (after we got the generator, of course).

Hurricanes are no reason to party if you've ever been through a bad one and actually felt like you might not make it through to see the damage in the morning.

Just a reminder to anyone who decides not to evacuate when told to do so - they might not come rescue you in the middle of the storm when you decide that staying was a bad idea.

Everybody be safe, Atlantic hurricane season starts in T-minus 11 days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2008, 02:27 PM
 
59 posts, read 51,028 times
Reputation: 15
The new sliding glass doors that the crook managers installed in my apartment complex, so they say, satisfy the new standards set fourth by the county and the insurance companies. However, they are made in Colombia, and they do a poorer job of blocking aircraft and traffic noise than the older 20-year-old sliding glass doors. I don't believe in codes if people can sidestep quality and order doors from Colombia that are supposedly just as good as American built doors. Gimme a break.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2008, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
16,416 posts, read 25,140,554 times
Reputation: 16462
While we're on the subject of condos.. do you think a condo basically touching cocowalk would experience any storm surge in a hurricane?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2008, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Miami
6,853 posts, read 19,243,208 times
Reputation: 2898
Quote:
Originally Posted by burgler09 View Post
While we're on the subject of condos.. do you think a condo basically touching cocowalk would experience any storm surge in a hurricane?
It could depending on the storm. Isn't there a small ridge right around Peacock Park pavillion, I think the land gets higher as you get closer to Cocowalk, but it could happen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-21-2008, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Miami
763 posts, read 3,167,482 times
Reputation: 257
Quote:
Originally Posted by doggiebus View Post
It could depending on the storm. Isn't there a small ridge right around Peacock Park pavillion, I think the land gets higher as you get closer to Cocowalk, but it could happen.
Yeah, the Grove slopes up and it's on small hill, so my guess would be no, that'd have to be some really intense storm to reach there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Miami
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:59 PM.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top