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Old 05-25-2009, 06:57 AM
 
Location: The Shires
2,257 posts, read 1,812,094 times
Reputation: 1050

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....and even more determined to leave.

My wife and I spent a few days in MA and we had a great time. The weather was hot as hell (93 degrees), but it didn't feel anywhere near as oppressive as the heat and humidity in Miami.

I'd been to MA before, but it was the first time for my wife and she fell in love with the place. There is just so much there for both of us and it seemed like we found a photo opportunity on every corner. People walk, cycle and run a lot more there, which I really like. People are out at all hours doing this, women and men alike.

I'd say that people there are generally friendly, but somewhat more reserved (i.e. they won't come up to you and say "hi", putting the onus on you to make the effort first to break the ice). We drove through some of the wealthy areas, some middle class and working class neighborhoods around Boston, Lynn, Salem and Marblehead and found that even the more wealthy areas were nowhere near as pretentious and in your face as Miami. I did manage to strike up normal conversations with people there though about anything. I felt more confident, so did my wife.

Once you get accustomed to the much narrower roads, driving in MA is a doddle compared to South Florida. I drove through Boston twice during their rush hour and although traffic was very bad and there were the usual big city aggressive drivers & the odd idiot, it was nothing compared to the hell on earth known as driving in Miami. In fact, we found that outside of Boston (and even in Boston itself during the weekend), drivers were generally sensible and some were extremely courteous and would actually stop to allow you to make a left at an intersection, even if it was their right of way. I also noticed that very few people speed excessively, even on the open highways.

One of the things I like most about MA is the fact that unlike Florida in general, it's truly diverse. In Boston & some of the smaller towns, we observed black people, white people, Chinese people and Hispanic people all interacting and co-existing peacefully.

I also like the fact that MA is a much "older" state, with old, beautiful colonial buildings everywhere. Many people take pride in their homes and their gardens. I saw very few "cookie cutter" homes, hardly any strip malls and fewer fast food chains than in just Kendall alone. In fact, the only common "chain" there was Dunkin Donuts.

Unlike Miami, Boston has the advantage of being smaller, more compact, yet it has more of a "big city" feel to it. Also, I liked the fact that you can be out of Boston very quickly and in the middle of the New England countryside, complete with woods and hills. I even found a new gem just 30 minutes away from Boston itself called Marblehead. The town was so old and beautiful that I took many pictures; it looked like someone had placed a Cornish coastal town with an old German town in a blender and Marblehead was the end result.

Both my wife and I did more walking in the space of 4 days than we'd done in a year. Everyone walks there....and there's mass transit. We felt very un-intimidated and while people were somewhat reserved, they left us alone, didn't stare at us, or make us feel unwelcome in any way (this is what I crave).

We flew back into Miami yesterday and right from the word "go", s**t went pear-shaped. Firstly, our plane was grounded in Miami Airport because there wasn't anyone to taxi us in. Our luggage had been put on the wrong flight, so we waited an hour at baggage claim, only to be greeted by the usual Miami rudeness and lack of professionalism and respect. We eventually got our luggage though (thank god!) and as we stepped outside, the oppressive heat and humidity hit us like a ton of bricks, even though it was only 79. I swear, the minute we pulled out of the airport, someone cut me off and another car tailgated me nasty style (it was raining badly). As we were hungry, we stopped at a local McDonalds, only to be treated like cr-p, so we drove off and back home to our bubble.

Coming back here was depressing, at best. Back to the grid system, fast food chains on every corner, highways and concrete and people that I simply cannot relate to. As soon as the economy picks up, we're leaving....at least my wife has seen the place that I love too. I understand that some people do like/love it here and I'm not taking that away from them, but this is a bad match for us in just about every sense. I honestly believe that we would be much happier elsewhere, without living in such a stressful place that isn't particularly tolerant.

 
Old 05-25-2009, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Miami, FL / Raleigh, NC
980 posts, read 1,928,761 times
Reputation: 606
Unfortunately, that is exactly how I felt returning home to Miami after spending most of the summer in Raleigh, NC. It took me about 2-3 days to get re-acclimated to the driving, pace, people, lack of service, and rudeness of Miami.

It is amazing, I did not miss Miami while I was gone. In fact, I missed being in NC for weeks after returning back to Miami. I have known for several years already that I wanted to move from here, but after returning to Miami and feeling the way I did, it just motivated me more to more prudently plan ahead to make a move in the near future.

I am really hoping to be out of here within the next year or 2.
 
Old 05-25-2009, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Lots of sun and palm trees with occasional hurricane :)
8,292 posts, read 14,837,673 times
Reputation: 6981
I guess it's pretty obvious what each one of you needs to do, and I am not saying this in any offensive or "rude" way. You gotta do what you gotta do and you guys are young enough that you should make a go at life whereever it makes you happier. Miami is not your cup of tea, or coffee, or soda, or anything so move on to your happily ever after.

I came back to add another comment.

If you are STUCK here in Miami, then make the best of it while you do whatever you need to do to GO away. It would make your lives so much richer, and mine too.

You complain about lack of courtesy, lifestyle and anything in between but you create your own misery with the bad attitudes. Why do you want to rub off on everyone else by posting this out-of-nowhere, irrelevant and meaningless story. What's your point? What's your purpose? To antagonize and breed more award winning comments?
 
Old 05-25-2009, 07:40 AM
 
2,113 posts, read 4,437,279 times
Reputation: 914
Quote:
Originally Posted by BCreass View Post
....and even more determined to leave.

My wife and I spent a few days in MA and we had a great time. The weather was hot as hell (93 degrees), but it didn't feel anywhere near as oppressive as the heat and humidity in Miami.

I'd been to MA before, but it was the first time for my wife and she fell in love with the place. There is just so much there for both of us and it seemed like we found a photo opportunity on every corner. People walk, cycle and run a lot more there, which I really like. People are out at all hours doing this, women and men alike.

I'd say that people there are generally friendly, but somewhat more reserved (i.e. they won't come up to you and say "hi", putting the onus on you to make the effort first to break the ice). We drove through some of the wealthy areas, some middle class and working class neighborhoods around Boston, Lynn, Salem and Marblehead and found that even the more wealthy areas were nowhere near as pretentious and in your face as Miami. I did manage to strike up normal conversations with people there though about anything. I felt more confident, so did my wife.

Once you get accustomed to the much narrower roads, driving in MA is a doddle compared to South Florida. I drove through Boston twice during their rush hour and although traffic was very bad and there were the usual big city aggressive drivers & the odd idiot, it was nothing compared to the hell on earth known as driving in Miami. In fact, we found that outside of Boston (and even in Boston itself during the weekend), drivers were generally sensible and some were extremely courteous and would actually stop to allow you to make a left at an intersection, even if it was their right of way. I also noticed that very few people speed excessively, even on the open highways.

One of the things I like most about MA is the fact that unlike Florida in general, it's truly diverse. In Boston & some of the smaller towns, we observed black people, white people, Chinese people and Hispanic people all interacting and co-existing peacefully.

I also like the fact that MA is a much "older" state, with old, beautiful colonial buildings everywhere. Many people take pride in their homes and their gardens. I saw very few "cookie cutter" homes, hardly any strip malls and fewer fast food chains than in just Kendall alone. In fact, the only common "chain" there was Dunkin Donuts.

Unlike Miami, Boston has the advantage of being smaller, more compact, yet it has more of a "big city" feel to it. Also, I liked the fact that you can be out of Boston very quickly and in the middle of the New England countryside, complete with woods and hills. I even found a new gem just 30 minutes away from Boston itself called Marblehead. The town was so old and beautiful that I took many pictures; it looked like someone had placed a Cornish coastal town with an old German town in a blender and Marblehead was the end result.

Both my wife and I did more walking in the space of 4 days than we'd done in a year. Everyone walks there....and there's mass transit. We felt very un-intimidated and while people were somewhat reserved, they left us alone, didn't stare at us, or make us feel unwelcome in any way (this is what I crave).

We flew back into Miami yesterday and right from the word "go", s**t went pear-shaped. Firstly, our plane was grounded in Miami Airport because there wasn't anyone to taxi us in. Our luggage had been put on the wrong flight, so we waited an hour at baggage claim, only to be greeted by the usual Miami rudeness and lack of professionalism and respect. We eventually got our luggage though (thank god!) and as we stepped outside, the oppressive heat and humidity hit us like a ton of bricks, even though it was only 79. I swear, the minute we pulled out of the airport, someone cut me off and another car tailgated me nasty style (it was raining badly). As we were hungry, we stopped at a local McDonalds, only to be treated like cr-p, so we drove off and back home to our bubble.

Coming back here was depressing, at best. Back to the grid system, fast food chains on every corner, highways and concrete and people that I simply cannot relate to. As soon as the economy picks up, we're leaving....at least my wife has seen the place that I love too. I understand that some people do like/love it here and I'm not taking that away from them, but this is a bad match for us in just about every sense. I honestly believe that we would be much happier elsewhere, without living in such a stressful place that isn't particularly tolerant.

You have made it clear on many other posts that you do like Miami .. so what is the point of this post , who and what is it informing ?

I like The Boston area , the city itself is great .. , the history , the beauty and culture are unrivaled .. but who can afford it .... ... I am up in the Ashland and Natick areas outside of Boston all of the time on business ... the suburbs outside the city are just ok . I do not care much for the areas outside the city of Boston .... I have been going up to Mass for over ten years now and yes summers , spring and fall are nice but the winters are brutal and in time you will see that people are not very nice either and that drivers although not as bad as Miami are not to far behind .. they call them M*******s up there for a reason . The taxes are brutal up there as well and so is the cost of living .... good luck to you and remember the grass is always greener on the other side .
 
Old 05-25-2009, 07:41 AM
 
2,113 posts, read 4,437,279 times
Reputation: 914
Quote:
Originally Posted by vpcats View Post
I guess it's pretty obvious what each one of you needs to do, and I am not saying this in any offensive or "rude" way. You gotta do what you gotta do and you guys are young enough that you should make a go at life whereever it makes you happier. Miami is not your cup of tea, or coffee, or soda, or anything so move on to your happily ever after.

Agree 100% and please do not do what others who leave Miami unhappy tend to do ...... continue posting from your new found "paradise" .
 
Old 05-25-2009, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 23,806,660 times
Reputation: 4901
Miami is only desireable to those from a worse place. That is why it attracts so many third world refugees and international criminals. The Latin American culture is very materialistic, so you expect conspicuous consumption. However, I have found the migrants from Boston to Miami to be selfish and as strange as any other refugee that ends up in Miami. While I am no fan of the Northeast and its expensive, oppressive government I am always impressed by the looks of the more upscale areas compared to Miami. The abundance of trees and lawns in a northeastern suburb compared to the concrete and red tile of a Miami suburb is amazing. Even in Miami's wealthier areas you see most homes fenced and gated, while up north more are open to the street.

The difference is that in Miami everyone is from someplace else and in the USA you have areas where most are familiar with the language and laws of the land.
 
Old 05-25-2009, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Lots of sun and palm trees with occasional hurricane :)
8,292 posts, read 14,837,673 times
Reputation: 6981
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rock Newman View Post
You have made it clear on many other posts that you do like Miami .. so what is the point of this post , who and what is it informing ?

I like The Boston area , the city itself is great .. , the history , the beauty and culture are unrivaled .. but who can afford it .... ... I am up in the Ashland and Natick areas outside of Boston all of the time on business ... the suburbs outside the city are just ok . I do not care much for the areas outside the city of Boston .... I have been going up to Mass for over ten years now and yes summers , spring and fall are nice but the winters are brutal and in time you will see that people are not very nice either and that drivers although not as bad as Miami are not to far behind .. they call them M*******s up there for a reason . The taxes are brutal up there as well and so is the cost of living .... good luck to you and remember the grass is always greener on the other side .
Let 'em move to Boston. I'll even help pack!

Yeah, I've been to Boston too. I like it. Beautiful for a nice long weekend, in springtime.
 
Old 05-25-2009, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Lots of sun and palm trees with occasional hurricane :)
8,292 posts, read 14,837,673 times
Reputation: 6981
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallrick View Post
Miami is only desireable to those from a worse place. That is why it attracts so many third world refugees and international criminals. The Latin American culture is very materialistic, so you expect conspicuous consumption. However, I have found the migrants from Boston to Miami to be selfish and as strange as any other refugee that ends up in Miami. While I am no fan of the Northeast and its expensive, oppressive government I am always impressed by the looks of the more upscale areas compared to Miami. The abundance of trees and lawns in a northeastern suburb compared to the concrete and red tile of a Miami suburb is amazing. Even in Miami's wealthier areas you see most homes fenced and gated, while up north more are open to the street.

The difference is that in Miami everyone is from someplace else and in the USA you have areas where most are familiar with the language and laws of the land.
Right. And I just got off the boat yesterday.
 
Old 05-25-2009, 08:20 AM
 
Location: The Shires
2,257 posts, read 1,812,094 times
Reputation: 1050
Rock & Cats,

I appreciate your feedback, but I get the impression that you think that 1) just because Miami isn't my cup of tea that I'm going to be miserable anywhere and 2) that I'm looking for greener grass, as opposed to just different grass.

I would not live in Boston itself because as you mentioned, it is VERY expensive. However, I really liked Lynn, which is commutable (via train), affordable and diverse (quite a few Puerto Ricans there and I even saw a Cuban flag on a house.

As Tallrick pointed out, people take great pride in their gardens. As for the taxes, I know they're higher, but I found groceries, gas and rent to be cheaper. People up there didn't seem anywhere near as image-obsessed or as pretentious as they do here. Even in the upscale areas, many people drove fairly modest cars.

Listen, I don't think Miami "sucks". The city is just not for me and it's hard to make the best of a place that offers so little in terms of the things that you as an individual enjoy doing. It is very hard to make friends here and even finding a decent, adult conversation is hard to come by.

Why do people here have a problem with those who simply do not like Miami, but are not miserable people? I find this attitude baffling, to be honest.
 
Old 05-25-2009, 08:26 AM
 
Location: The Shires
2,257 posts, read 1,812,094 times
Reputation: 1050
Quote:
Originally Posted by vpcats View Post
Right. And I just got off the boat yesterday.
You know what, the typical Miami attitude is very clear to see in your posts. You cannot deal with any criticism of this place, because for some reason, it offends you so deeply. You bring Castro into threads that aren't even about that and I find you to be far more caustic than any of the negative posters that you constantly complain about.

Not everyone likes Miami, most people outside of Miami don't give a damn about Castro. Deal with it.
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